July 30: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, “The House that Ruth Built”

  • Wednesday, July 30: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Robert Weintraub discusses his book “The House that Ruth Built: A New Stadium, The First Yankees Championship, and the Redemption of 1923”

Weintraub examines the 1923 New York Yankees, the team that opened Yankee Stadium and won the first of the Bronx Bombers’ record 27 World Series titles. The center of this work is the clash between the Yankees’ star, Babe Ruth, with his new “bashing” style of playing the game, and the classic “scientific baseball” epitomized by manager John McGraw and his New York Giants. While the Giants got the best of the Yanks in the ’22 fall classic, Ruth and the Yankees’ 1923 World Series victory over their crosstown rivals would change the face of baseball and New York City forever.. Weintraub details everything from the construction of the stadium and the careers of Ruth and McGraw to a detailed season overview and deconstruction of the 1923 World Series.

  • Wednesday, July 30: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Robert Weintraub discusses his book “The House that Ruth Built: A New Stadium, The First Yankees Championship, and the Redemption of 1923”

Weintraub examines the 1923 New York Yankees, the team that opened Yankee Stadium and won the first of the Bronx Bombers’ record 27 World Series titles. The center of this work is the clash between the Yankees’ star, Babe Ruth, with his new “bashing” style of playing the game, and the classic “scientific baseball” epitomized by manager John McGraw and his New York Giants. While the Giants got the best of the Yanks in the ’22 fall classic, Ruth and the Yankees’ 1923 World Series victory over their crosstown rivals would change the face of baseball and New York City forever.. Weintraub details everything from the construction of the stadium and the careers of Ruth and McGraw to a detailed season overview and deconstruction of the 1923 World Series.

August 5: John Kasson: “The Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression”

  • Tuesday, August 5: Lecture, 7 pm: Author John Kasson discusses his book “The Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression: Shirley Temple and 1930’s America”

Her image appeared in periodicals and advertisements roughly twenty times daily; she rivaled FDR and Edward VIII as the most photographed person in the world. Her portrait brightened the homes of countless admirers: from a black laborer’s cabin in South Carolina and young Andy Warhol’s house in Pittsburgh to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s recreation room in Washington, DC, and gangster “Bumpy” Johnson’s Harlem apartment. A few years later her smile cheered the secret bedchamber of Anne Frank in Amsterdam as young Anne hid from the Nazis.

For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world’s box-office champion, a record never equaled. By early 1935 her mail was reported as four thousand letters a week, and hers was the second-most popular girl’s name in the country. What distinguished Shirley Temple from every other Hollywood star of the period—and everyone since—was how brilliantly she shone. Amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come. Distinguished cultural historian John F. Kasson shows how the most famous, adored, imitated, and commodified child in the world astonished movie goers, created a new international culture of celebrity, and revolutionized the role of children as consumers.

September 10: Chip Bishop: “Quentin and Flora”

  • Wednesday, September 10: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Chip Bishop discusses his book “Quentin and Flora: A Roosevelt and a Vanderbilt in Love during the Great War”

For the first time, the compelling tale of Quentin Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest son, and his secret fiancée, Flora Payne Whitney, is told in rich and absorbing detail by New York Times Bestselling-Author Chip Bishop. At the ebb of the Gilded Age, young Quentin is the scion of America most celebrated political family. And lovely Flora is the privileged daughter of the Whitneys and the Vanderbilts, two of the nation’s richest dynasties. The lives of Quentin and Flora intersect at the dawn of the Great War in Europe after each has grown up in the public spotlight – he in the White House and she in the storied mansions of New York and Newport. His childhood precociousness charms the nation and parallels Flora’s envelopment in her parents’ worlds of high art, luxury yachts and personal unfaithfulness. Quentin and Flora reach beyond their families’ orbits to begin a searching adolescent companionship that evolves inexorably into a fairy tale romance, challenged by the danger of war and a vast and perilous ocean. Through their actual letters, deeply unexplored for a hundred years, we share their youthful dreams and desires, and partake in the agony of their separation amid encircling, high-level political intrigue.

  • Wednesday, September 10: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Chip Bishop discusses his book “Quentin and Flora: A Roosevelt and a Vanderbilt in Love during the Great War”

For the first time, the compelling tale of Quentin Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest son, and his secret fiancée, Flora Payne Whitney, is told in rich and absorbing detail by New York Times Bestselling-Author Chip Bishop. At the ebb of the Gilded Age, young Quentin is the scion of America most celebrated political family. And lovely Flora is the privileged daughter of the Whitneys and the Vanderbilts, two of the nation’s richest dynasties. The lives of Quentin and Flora intersect at the dawn of the Great War in Europe after each has grown up in the public spotlight – he in the White House and she in the storied mansions of New York and Newport. His childhood precociousness charms the nation and parallels Flora’s envelopment in her parents’ worlds of high art, luxury yachts and personal unfaithfulness. Quentin and Flora reach beyond their families’ orbits to begin a searching adolescent companionship that evolves inexorably into a fairy tale romance, challenged by the danger of war and a vast and perilous ocean. Through their actual letters, deeply unexplored for a hundred years, we share their youthful dreams and desires, and partake in the agony of their separation amid encircling, high-level political intrigue.

September 17: Hugh Howard, “Mr. and Mrs. Madison’s War”

  • Wednesday, September 17: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Hugh Howard discusses his book “Mr. and Mrs. Madison’s War: America’s First Couple and the Second War of Independence”

August 28, 1814. Dressed in black, James Madison mourns the nation’s loss. Smoke rises from the ruin of the Capitol before him; a mile away stands the blackened shell of the White House. The British have laid waste to Washington City, and as Mr. Madison gazes at the terrible vista, he ponders the future-his country’s defeat or victory-in a war he began over the unanimous objections of his political adversaries. As we approach its bicentennial, the War of 1812 remains the least understood of America’s wars. To some it was a conflict that resolved nothing, but to others, it was our second war of independence, settling once and for all that America would never again submit to Britain. At its center was James Madison-our most meditative of presidents, yet the first one to declare war. And at his side was the extraordinary Dolley, who defined the role of first lady for all to follow, and who would prove perhaps her husband’s most indispensable ally.

Sunday, September 21: Portrayal: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Revere

  • Sunday, September 21, 2:30 pm: Re-enactment performance: “The Revere’s Ride Again!”

Character re-enactors Lee K. Riethmiller and Jessa S. Piaia will present a living history portrayal of Paul and Rachel Revere, in the program set in 1805, entitled “Meet Noted Patriots, the Reveres, Paul & Rachel Revere Ride Again!”  Paul Revere married Rachel Walker within five months of the passing of his first wife, Sarah, who died following the birth of their sixth child; Rachel took on the care of the children, and with Paul had six more of their own.  Clad in period attire, Lee and Jessa portray this early 19th century couple of “forthright hospitality and remarkable good humour,” as they relate episodes of their life both during and after the American Revolution.  The program runs about 50 minutes in length, with Q&A discussion to follow, and is appropriate for ages 10 to adult.The dramatization animates the “Spirit of the Day,” as Paul & Rachel recount the exciting tale of life in Boston’s North End when America was still a British Crown Colony.  Hear about the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party which he participated in, and the stirring events that led to the famous Midnight Ride in April 1775.  Relive the drama of Colonial unrest that culminated in America’s Revolution, and what followed after the framing of our Declaration of Independence from Britain and the United States Constitution, when Paul Revere ventured from being a respected artisan into being a successful industrialist in Canton, Massachusetts, during the early days of the new Republic.