“A Walk Through Falmouth’s Past” Ceramic Art Exhibit–May 8 through June 11, 2015

A Walk Through Falmouth’s Past,” an exhibition featuring works by ceramic art students from Falmouth High School, will be on view in the Cultural Center from May 8 to June 11.  The show is the result of collaboration between the students and Falmouth Historical Society. Last winter, 40 Ceramics II students and 15 Ceramics III students visited Museums on the Green and met with staff and volunteers to learn more about significant periods of Falmouth’s past, such as Wampanoag culture, the whaling industry, and the Victorian era, to name a few. The goal was to further educate the students about their town, while also providing artistic inspiration for learning new ceramics techniques. The project is funded by a grant from Falmouth Education Foundation awarded to FHS ceramics art instructor Corine Adams.whale teapot

The Ceramics II students learned how to make ceramic teapots and tea cups using the potter’s wheel, each portraying the historical era of their choosing. Ceramics III students created a large garden totem composed of 15 individual pieces, also reflective of a chosen time in history, and, using the potter’s wheel, created the base for the totem piece. The students constructed a unique three-dimensional design which will withstand the elements for permanent outdoor display in the Museum’s Memorial Park, to serve as an interactive scavenger hunt for youngsters to learn and discover more about local history.

May 14: Lorri Glover lecture: “Founders as Fathers”

  • Thursday, May 14, 7 pm: Lorri Glover, author of “Founders as Fathers: The Private Lives and Politics of the American Revolutionaries”lglover1@slu.edu Lorri Glover-Author

     

How did family life shaped the political careers of America’s great Founding Fathers—men like George Mason, Patrick Henry, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison?  Historian Lorri Glover brings to life the vexing, joyful, arduous, and sometimes tragic experiences of the architects of the American Republic who, while building a nation, were also raising families.
The costs and consequences for the families of these Virginia leaders were great.  The Revolution remade family life no less than it reinvented political institutions. “Founders as Fathers” describes the colonial households that nurtured future revolutionaries, follows the development of political and family values during the revolutionary years, and shines new light on the radically transformed world that was inherited by nineteenth-century descendants.

This lecture made possible in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council.

 

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Saturday, May 16, 4pm: Roseanne Montillo lecture: “The Wilderness of Ruin”

  • Saturday, May 16, 4 pm: Roseanne Montillo, “The Wilderness of Ruin: A Tale of Madness, Boston’s Great Fire and the Hunt for America’s Youngest Serial Killer”

In the early 1870s, local children begin disappearing from the working-class neighborhoods of Boston. Several return home bloody and bruised after being tortured, while others never come back.. With the city on edge, authorities believe the abductions are the handiwork of a psychopath, until they discover that their killer—fourteen-year-old Jesse Pomeroy—is barely older than his victims. The criminal investigation that follows sparks a debate among the world’s most revered medical minds, and will have a decades-long impact on the judicial system and medical consciousness.

“The Wilderness of Ruin”  is a riveting tale of gruesome murder and depravity. At its heart is Gilded Age Boston , divided by class—a chasm that widens in the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1872, and the genteel cobblestone streets of Beacon Hill to the squalid, overcrowded tenements of Southie. .. Here, too, is the writer Herman Melville. Enthralled by the child killer’s case, he enlists physician Oliver Wendell Holmes to help him understand how it might relate to his own mental instability.

May 19: Michael McNaught lecture: “Gallipoli”

  • Tuesday, May 19, 7 pm: Michael McNaught, “The Battle of Gallipoli, 1915”

During World War I, Allies England and France teamed up to create a naval passage to their allies in Russia through the Straits of the Dardanelles. The attack was repelled by the Ottoman Empire and led to the resignation and near ruin of Secretary of the Navy Winston Churchill. The campaign was one of the greatest Ottoman victories during the war and a major Allied failure. In Turkey, it is regarded as a defining moment in the nation’s history: a final surge in the defense of the motherland as the Ottoman Empire crumbled. The struggle formed the basis for the Turkish War of Independence and the founding of the Republic of Turkey eight years later under Mustafa Kemal Atatürk who first rose to prominence as a commander at Gallipoli.

Bus Trip to Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum May 19th

On Tuesday, May 19th, the Museums on the Green will take a motorcoach to Provincetown, MA to visit the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum. The monument was built in 1907 to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrims (who originally stopped in Provincetown before continuing on to Plymouth). It was there that the Pilgrims signed the “Mayflower Compact” and the museum itself celebrates Provincetown’s rich maritime past.

The bus will depart from Falmouth at 9 am on May 19th and leave Provincetown at 3 pm.

Tickets are $ 45 per person, which includes the bus trip and museum admission.

Lunch is not included and will be handled by each individual.

To make a reservation, simply click on the link below or call 508-548-4857, ext. 11:


Provincetown Bus Tour May 19, 2015



 
 

 
 

 

 
 
 

 

May 20: Casey Sherman and David Wedge: “Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy”

  • Wednesday, May 20, 7 pm: Casey Sherman and David Wedge, “Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy” (To Be Held at St. Barnabas Church, 91 Main Street, Falmouth)

Veteran journalists Casey Sherman and Dave Wedge have written the definitive inside look at the Boston Marathon bombings with a unique, Boston-based account of the events that riveted the world. From the Tsarnaev brothers’ years leading up to the act of terror to the bomb scene itself (which both authors witnessed first-hand within minutes of the blast), from the terrifying police shootout with the suspects to the ultimate capture of the younger brother, Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy reports all the facts—and so much more. Based on months of intensive interviews, this is the first book to tell the entire story through the eyes of those who experienced it. From the cop first on the scene, to the detectives assigned to the manhunt, the authors provide a behind-the-scenes look at the investigation. More than a true-crime book, Boston Strong also tells the tragic but ultimately life-affirming story of the victims and their recoveries and gives voice to those who lost loved ones.

May 21: John Barylick lecture: “Killer Show”

  • Thursday, May 21, 7 pm: John Barylick, author of “Killer Show: The Station Nightclub Fire”

On February 20, 2003, the deadliest rock concert in U.S. history took place at a roadhouse called The Station in West Warwick, Rhode Island. That night, in the few minutes it takes to play a hard-rock standard, the fate of many of the unsuspecting nightclub patrons was determined with awful certainty. The blaze was ignited when pyrotechnics set off by Great White, a 1980s heavy-metal band, lit flammable polyurethane “egg crate” foam sound insulation on the club’s walls. In less than 10 minutes, 96 people were dead and 200 more were injured, many catastrophically. The final death toll topped out, three months later, at the eerily unlikely round number of 100. The story of the fire, its causes, and its legal and human aftermath is one of lives put at risk by petty economic decisions—by a band, club owners, promoters, building inspectors, and product manufacturers. Any one of those decisions, made differently, might have averted the tragedy. Together, however, they reached a fatal critical mass. ”Killer Show” is the first comprehensive exploration of the chain of events leading up to the fire, the conflagration itself, and the painstaking search for evidence to hold the guilty to account and obtain justice for the victims.