July 13: Hydrangea Fest on Cape Cod

Hydrangea Fest

Hydrangeas are the signature flower of Cape Cod, and the inaugural Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival will celebrate these beautiful blue, pink and white blooms at their peak!
Take a glimpse into some of Cape Cod’s most spectacular gardens during the Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival, from July 10-17, 2016. The festival will include tours of all types of private gardens organized by local nonprofits and museums, along with special hydrangea-themed events and promotions.

The Museums on the Green will be a participant in this event as well. Five locations are scheduled to take part on behalf of the Museums, and will be open on Wednesday, July 13, from 10 am to 4 pm. Those locations are:

 

Captain’s Manor Inn, 27 W. Main Street, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

The Inn was originally built in 1849 by Captain Albert Nye as a family home. The second owner, Captain John Robinson Lawrence had a son H. V. Lawrence who became a well known horticulturist and the first florist on Cape Cod.  The grounds of the Inn bear witness to his talents with many unique trees that survive to this day.  The property hosts gardens in the front and back of the Inn on 1.2 acres. There are hydrangeas and azaleas in both the front and back gardens and numerous varieties of day lilies, roses, hostas, bell flowers, peonies, pansies, dahlias etc.

28 Sady’s Lane, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This garden was featured in Cape Cod Home magazine in fall 2015 and be featured in a national gardening magazine in 2017. Visitors will experience surprising vistas and vignettes while strolling the winding garden paths. A stone patio walled by espaliered pear trees and dogwood, archways of beech trees and hydrangea, and a small pond are some of the features of the thirty year old garden. The summer garden includes collections of daylilies, hosta, and hydrangea. Annuals, tropical plants, and container plants accent the garden borders

383 Boxberry Hill Road, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This site and the restored home were part of the original 19th century Silas Hatch Homestead (giving the village the name Hatchville) and became the agricultural center of Falmouth. In the 1920’s it became the largest dairy farm east of the Mississippi and remains of that activity can be found on the property.  Today the Hidden House Farm grows organic vegetables and fruits along with a modest selection of common New England herbs with a bit of a contemporary touch.  It has, say some old timers, more “boxberry trees” on this property than anywhere else. This site was once part of a working farm. The home is not on the main road but fronts on a bridal path that is hidden from view and surrounded by horse farms, 300 acres of local conservation to the east and 600 acres of protected state land to the north.

Palmer House Inn, 81 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

At the Inn, there are four buildings and four small gardens. Before going to see the gardens, stop at the Inn’s side veranda to enjoy lemonade and cookies.  The first, garden is the T.W Burgess Garden that is home to several rabbits and is a cool shady spot for guests to relax on a warm summer’s afternoon. Next, there is the H.D.Thoreau Cottage Garden that gives this secluded cottage suite its own private bit of nature. Third, the Innkeeper’s Cottage garden is a pleasant shade garden located at the back of the inn’s property. Last but not least, one can walk through the inn’s herb garden, where the organically grown herbs are located in individual stone bordered beds. The herbs are used in the inn’s sumptuous breakfasts. We suggest that those coming to view the garden, park at the Falmouth Museums on the Green parking lot on Katharine Lee Bates Road. After parking one can stroll through the Museum’s lovely colonial gardens. Upon exiting the garden gate, turn right and take the sidewalk to the Palmer House Inn.

37 Arthur Street, North Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This is a woodland garden on a 2 acre, hilly site where winding lawns are bordered by mixed beds of flowering trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals.  There are many of the standbys – kousas, vibernums, day lilies, hostas by the dozens, heuchera, peonies, iris, roses, sedges, candelabra primulas, lambs ears, grasses, salvias, ageratum, nicotianas, cannas, astilbes – and some less standard – filipendula, jack in the pulpits, podophyllum.  This years’ experiment is lilies of several kinds, missing for several years because of red beetles but willing to try again.  Wear walking shoes – there are woodland paths down to a pond and uphill to an overview of the largest part of the garden.

Each venue will cost $ 5 to attend per person. Tickets can be purchased at each venue or by going to the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce. You can also purchase tickets here:


Hydrangea Fest
Falmouth venues Hydrangea Fest



To learn more about this event Cape-wide, click on http://www.capecodchamber.org/hydrangea-fest

 

Thursday, July 14, 7 pm: Robert Weintraub, “No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog, and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage and Survival in World War II”

No Better FriendFlight technician Frank Williams and Judy, a purebred pointer, met in the most unlikely of places: a World War II internment camp in the Pacific. Judy was a fiercely loyal dog, with a keen sense for who was friend and who was foe, and the pair’s relationship deepened throughout their captivity. When the prisoners suffered beatings, Judy would repeatedly risk her life to intervene. She survived bombings and other near-death experiences and became a beacon not only for Frank but for all the men, who saw in her survival a flicker of hope for their own. Judy’s devotion to those she was interned with was matched by their love for her, which helped keep the men and their dog alive despite the ever-present threat of death by disease or the rifles of the guards. At one point, deep in despair and starvation, Frank contemplated killing himself and the dog to prevent either from watching the other die. But both were rescued, and Judy spent the rest of her life with Frank. She became the war’s only official canine POW, and after she died at age fourteen, Frank couldn’t bring himself to ever have another dog. Their story–of an unbreakable bond forged in the worst circumstances–is one of the great undiscovered sagas of World War II.

Wednesday, July 27, 7 pm: Manisha Sinha, “The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition”

Slaves CauseReceived historical wisdom casts abolitionists as mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. University of Massachusetts Professor Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave’s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.

Wednesday, July 20, 7 pm: Charlotte Gordon, “Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter Mary Shelley”

romantic outlawsThis groundbreaking dual biography brings to life a pioneering English feminist and the daughter she never knew. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley have each been the subject of numerous biographies, yet no one has ever examined their lives in one book—until now. In Romantic Outlaws,Charlotte Gordon reunites the trailblazing author who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Romantic visionary who gave the world Frankenstein—two courageous women who should have shared their lives, but instead shared a powerful literary and feminist legacy.

In 1797, less than two weeks after giving birth to her second daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft died, and a remarkable life spent pushing against the boundaries of society’s expectations for women came to an end. But another was just beginning. Wollstonecraft’s daughter Mary was to follow a similarly audacious path. Both women had passionate relationships with several men, bore children out of wedlock, and chose to live in exile outside their native country. Each in her own time fought against the injustices women faced and wrote books that changed literary history. The private lives of both Marys were nothing less than the stuff of great Romantic drama, providing fabulous material for Charlotte Gordon, an accomplished historian and a gifted storyteller. Taking readers on a vivid journey across revolutionary France and Victorian England, she seamlessly interweaves the lives of her two protagonists in alternating chapters, creating a book that reads like a richly textured historical novel. Gordon also paints unforgettable portraits of the men in their lives, including the mercurial genius Percy Shelley, the unbridled libertine Lord Byron, and the brilliant radical William Godwin.