Special Performance: Anne Barrett as Victoria Yule, December 9, 2 pm

Travel back in time to Christmas 1895 with Victoria Yule as your hostess.

anne-barrettVictoria Yule will welcome you into her parlor, complete with an antique chair, table and props, and share her plans for the upcoming Christmas festivities. Learn the history of many Christmas traditions from stories passed down to her from “Grandmama and Grandpapa”. She’ll read Dickens, display toys and handmade gifts her family will be exchanging around the Christmas tree, and in her clear soprano, sing carols of the season. Travel back in time to Christmas 1895 with this fun, creative and engaging performance.

 

Friday, November 10, 2 pm: Leonid Kondratiuk, “Massachusetts Goes to War: The 26th Yankee Division in World War One”

Yankee DivisionThe 26th “Yankee” Division, composed of units from the National Guards of the New England states, was the first full US Army division to arrive in France in 1917. Approximately, 15,000 Massachusetts men served in the 26th making it the largest unit the state sent to the war. Virtually, every town had men serving in the 26th. General Kondratiuk will speak about the Yankee Division’s role in World War I.

October 5, 7 pm: William J. Mann, “The War of the Roosevelts: The Ruthless Rise of America’s Greatest Political Family”

war-of-the-rooseveltsThe award-winning author presents a provocative, thoroughly modern revisionist biographical history of one of America’s greatest and most influential families—the Roosevelts—exposing heretofore unknown family secrets and detailing complex family rivalries with his signature cinematic flair.

Drawing on previously hidden historical documents and interviews with the long-silent “illegitimate” branch of the family, William J. Mann paints an elegant, meticulously researched, and groundbreaking group portrait of this legendary family. Mann argues that the Roosevelts’ rise to power and prestige was actually driven by a series of intense personal contest that at times devolved into blood sport. His compelling and eye-opening masterwork is the story of a family at war with itself, of social Darwinism at its most ruthless—in which the strong devoured the weak and repudiated the inconvenient.

Mann focuses on Eleanor Roosevelt, who, he argues, experienced this brutality firsthand, witnessing her Uncle Theodore cruelly destroy her father, Elliott—his brother and bitter rival—for political expediency. Mann presents a fascinating alternate picture of Eleanor, contending that this “worshipful niece” in fact bore a grudge against TR for the rest of her life, and dares to tell the truth about her intimate relationships without obfuscations, explanations, or labels.

Mann also brings into focus Eleanor’s cousins, TR’s children, whose stories propelled the family rivalry but have never before been fully chronicled, as well as her illegitimate half-brother, Elliott Roosevelt Mann, who inherited his family’s ambition and skill without their name and privilege. Growing up in poverty just miles from his wealthy relatives, Elliott Mann embodied the American Dream, rising to middle-class prosperity and enjoying one of the very few happy, long-term marriages in the Roosevelt saga. For the first time, The Wars of the Roosevelts also includes the stories of Elliott’s daughter and grandchildren, and never-before-seen photographs from their archives.

Thursday, September 28, 7 pm: Fred Morin & John Galluzzo, “A History of Massachusetts Aviation”

Explore the Bay State’s Aviation History

mass-aviationShortly after the Wright brothers took to the air, aviation fever gripped Massachusetts. The biggest names in the industry, including Wilbur Wright, Glenn Curtiss, and Claude Graham-White, among others, flew in for the first major air shows, further exciting the people of the Bay State about the potential of manned flight in the realms of military tactics, the expansion of commerce, and even personal transportation. By the 1920s, Massachusetts had become home to the first Naval Air Reserve Base, in Quincy; one of the first Coast Guard Air Stations, in Gloucester; and the Boston Airfield, which would become the largest international airport in New England. Within a few decades, individuals like Edward Lawrence Logan, Frank Otis, Oscar Westover, and Laurence G. Hanscomb would permanently leave their names on the Massachusetts landscape in connection with the airports and airfields still used today.

Our September lectures are sponsored by Cape Cod Five Savings 

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Saturday, September 16, 2 pm: Dava Sobel, “The Glass Universe”

PART OF THE ‘WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT THIS?’ SERIES OF LECTURES ON mass-humanities-logoWOMEN’S HISTORY, SPONSORED BY MASSHUMANITIES

 

 In the mid-nineteenth century, the Harvard College Observatory began employing women as calculators, or “human computers,” to interpret the observations their male counterparts made via telescope each night. At the outset this group included the wives, sisters, and daughters of the resident astronomers, but soon the female corps included graduates of the new women’s colleges—Vassar, Wellesley, and Smith. As photography transformed the practice of astronomy, the ladies turned from computation to studying the stars captured nightly on glass photographic plates.

glass-universeThe “glass universe” of half a million plates that Harvard amassed over the ensuing decades—through the generous support of Mrs. Anna Palmer Draper, the widow of a pioneer in stellar photography—enabled the women to make extraordinary discoveries that attracted worldwide acclaim. They helped discern what stars were made of, divided the stars into meaningful categories for further research, and found a way to measure distances across space by starlight. Their ranks included Williamina Fleming, a Scottish woman originally hired as a maid who went on to identify ten novae and more than three hundred variable stars; Annie Jump Cannon, who designed a stellar classification system that was adopted by astronomers the world over and is still in use; and Dr. Cecilia Helena Payne, who in 1956 became the first ever woman professor of astronomy at Harvard—and Harvard’s first female department chair.

Our March lectures are sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit UnionFirst Citizens

Sept. 13, 7 pm: Michael McNaught: “Britain’s Calvary: The Battle of the Somme, 1916”

The Battle of the Somme, also known as the Somme Offensive, was one of the largest battles of the First World War. Fought between July 1 and November 1, 1916 near the Somme River in France, it was also one of the bloodiest military battles in history. On the first day alone, the British suffered more than 57,000 casualties, and by the end of the campaign the Allies and Central Powers would lose more than 1.5 million men.

Battle-of-the-SommeThe Somme campaign in 1916 was the first great offensive of World War I for the British, and it produced a more critical British attitude toward the war. During and after the Somme, the British army started a real improvement in tactics. Also, the French attacked at the Somme and achieved greater advances on July 1 than the British did, with far fewer casualties. But it is the losses that are most remembered. The first day of the Somme offensive, July 1, 1916, resulted in 57,470 British casualties, greater than the total combined British casualties in the Crimean, Boer, and Korean wars. In contrast, the French, with fewer divisions, suffered only around 2,000 casualties. By the time the offensive ended in November, the British had suffered around 420,000 casualties, and the French about 200,000. German casualty numbers are controversial, but may be about 465,000.

Our September lectures are sponsored by Cape Cod Five Savings

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September 6, 7 pm: Leigh Montville, “Sting Like a Bee: Muhammad Ali vs. the United States of America, 1966-1971

Leigh MontvilleWith the death of Muhammad Ali in June, 2016, the media and America in general have remembered a hero, a heavyweight champion, an Olympic gold medalist, an icon, and a man who represents the sheer greatness of America. New York Times bestselling author Leigh Montville goes deeper, with a fascinating chronicle of a story that has been largely untold. Muhammad Ali, in the late 1960s, was young, successful, brash, and hugely admired—but with some reservations. He was bombastic and cocky in a way that captured the imagination of America, but also drew its detractors. He was a bold young African American in an era when few people were as outspoken. He renounced his name—Cassius Clay—as being his ‘slave name,’ and joined the Nation of Islam, renaming himself Muhammad Ali. And finally in 1966, after being drafted, he refused to join the military for religious and conscientious reasons, triggering a fight that was larger than any of his bouts in the ring. What followed was a period of legal battles, of cultural obsession, and in some ways of being the very embodiment of the civil rights movement located in the heart of one man. Muhammad Ali was the tip of the arrow, and Leigh Montville brilliantly assembles all the boxing, the charisma, the cultural and political shifting tides, and ultimately the enormous waft of entertainment that always surrounded Ali. Muhammed Ali vs. the United States of America is an important and incredibly engaging book.

Our September lectures are sponsored by Cape Cod Five Savings

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August 16, 7 pm: Peter Cozzens, “The Earth is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West”

earth-is-weepingWith the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies.

Our August lectures sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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August 12, 2 pm: Melinda Ponder, “Katharine Lee Bates: From Sea to Shining Sea”

Melinda PonderOn August 12, the birthday of Katharine Lee Bates (1859-1929), poet of “America the Beautiful,” biographer Melinda M. Ponder will talk about her new book, Katharine Lee Bates: From Sea to Shining Sea.

 It tells the story of this brilliant trail-blazing woman—poet, teacher, community builder, and patriot—who challenged Americans to make their country the best it could become in its values and literature.

Drawing on extensive research in Bates family diaries, letters, and memoirs, this biography brings Katharine to life in her journeys from her childhood in Falmouth, where she felt she had been “rock’d in a clamshell,” to Wellesley College, Boston, Oxford, Spain and Egypt. Although her passion was poetry, Katharine’s three alluring suitors (two men and a woman) pulled her into major reform movements in a changing America. She was a dynamic woman with public triumphs, an anti-war activist poet during America’s tumultuous growth into a world power, who suffered personal heartaches as a single woman faced with choosing between marriage and a career. She refused to let an impoverished childhood in a Cape Cod village or the closed doors of the male-only bastions of the ministry, graduate schools, or the Yankee literary establishment prevent her from creating an inspiring life. This book is for those who love her song and those who root for the unlikely triumph of a complicated women “from sea to shining sea.”

Our August lectures sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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August 9, 4:00 pm: Martha Hall Kelly, “Lilac Girls”

kell_9781101883075_are_all_r1.inddNew York socialite Caroline Ferriday has her hands full with her post at the French consulate and a new love on the horizon. But Caroline’s world is forever changed when Hitler’s army invades Poland in September 1939—and then sets its sights on France.

An ocean away from Caroline, Kasia Kuzmerick, a Polish teenager, senses her carefree youth disappearing as she is drawn deeper into her role as courier for the underground resistance movement. In a tense atmosphere of watchful eyes and suspecting neighbors, one false move can have dire consequences.

For the ambitious young German doctor, Herta Oberheuser, an ad for a government medical position seems her ticket out of a desolate life. Once hired, though, she finds herself trapped in a male-dominated realm of Nazi secrets and power.

The lives of these three women are set on a collision course when the unthinkable happens and Kasia is sent to Ravensbrück, the notorious Nazi concentration camp for women. Their stories cross continents—from New York to Paris, Germany, and Poland—as Caroline and Kasia strive to bring justice to those whom history has forgotten.

Our August lectures are sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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August 2, 7 pm: Yudhijit Bhattacharjee, “The Spy Who Couldn’t Spell”

“The Spy Who Couldn’t Spell: A Dyslexic Traitor, an Unbreakable Code, and the FBI’s Hunt for America’s Stolen Secrets

 

spy-who-could-not-spellBefore Edward Snowden’s infamous data breach, the largest theft of government secrets was committed by an ingenious traitor whose intricate espionage scheme and complex system of coded messages were made even more baffling by his dyslexia. His name is Brian Regan, but he came to be known as The Spy Who Couldn’t Spell.

In December of 2000, FBI Special Agent Steven Carr of the bureau’s Washington, D.C., office received a package from FBI New York: a series of coded letters from an anonymous sender to the Libyan consulate, offering to sell classified United States intelligence. The offer, and the threat, were all too real. A self-proclaimed CIA analyst with top secret clearance had information about U.S. reconnaissance satellites, air defense systems, weapons depots, munitions factories, and underground bunkers throughout the Middle East. Rooting out the traitor would not be easy, but certain clues suggested a government agent with a military background, a family, and a dire need for money. Leading a diligent team of investigators and code breakers, Carr spent years hunting down a dangerous spy and his cache of stolen secrets.
In this fast-paced true-life spy thriller, Yudhijit Bhattacharjee reveals how the FBI unraveled Regan’s strange web of codes to build a case against a man who nearly collapsed America’s military security.

Our August lectures sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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July 26, 7 pm: Joseph Starita, “A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America’s First Indian Doctor”

Susan-LaFlesche-Picotte-1889On March 14, 1889, Susan La Flesche Picotte received her medical degree―becoming the first Native American doctor in U.S. history. She earned her degree thirty-one years before women could vote and thirty-five years before Indians could become citizens in their own country.

By age twenty-six, this fragile but indomitable Indian woman became the doctor to her tribe. Overnight, she acquired 1,244 patients scattered across 1,350 square miles of rolling countryside with few roads. Her patients often were desperately poor and desperately sick―tuberculosis, small pox, measles, influenza―families scattered miles apart, whose last hope was a young woman who spoke their language and knew their customs.

This is the story of an Indian woman who effectively became the chief of an entrenched patriarchal tribe, the story of a woman who crashed through thick walls of ethnic, racial and gender prejudice, then spent the rest of her life using a unique bicultural identity to improve the lot of her people―physically, emotionally, politically, and spiritually.

Joe Starita’s A Warrior of the People is the moving biography of Susan La Flesche Picotte’s inspirational life and dedication to public health, and it will finally shine a light on her numerous accomplishments.

Our July lectures sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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Wednesday, July 19, 7 pm: An Evening with Sergei Khrushchev

Sergei KhrushchevOn Wednesday, July 19 at 7 pm, the Museums on the Green welcomes Sergei Khrushchev to Falmouth. The son of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, Sergei resides in the United States where he is a Senior Fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. This appearance will be a part of the continuing commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of President John F. Kennedy.

Dr. Khrushchev will be discussing how his father and President Kennedy worked together to prevent nuclear war during the Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962. Additionally, Dr. Khrushchev can discuss how the United States and Russia are co-existing in 2017.

The discussion will be led by Mindy Todd, the host and producer of “The Point” on WCAI. This event will be held at Falmouth MindyToddAcademy. There will also be a special VIP event held in advance of the talk. Tickets are limited for the VIP event.

 

To purchase tickets, click below:


An Evening with Sergei Khrushchev Wed. July 19



To purchase VIP tickets, click below:
(VIP Tickets allow bearer to go to a special Meet and Greet with Dr. and Mrs. Khrushchev, where they can ask questions in advance, and get tickets to the front rows of the program.)


An Evening with Sergei Khrushchev VIP Tickets



July 12, 7 pm: Paul Staiti, “Of Arms and Artists: The American Revolution Through Painters’ Eyes”

of-arms-and-artistsThe images accompanying the founding of the United States–of honored Founders, dramatic battle scenes, and seminal moments–gave visual shape to Revolutionary events and symbolized an entirely new concept of leadership and government. Since then they have endured as indispensable icons, serving as historical documents and timeless reminders of the nation’s unprecedented beginnings.

As Paul Staiti reveals in Of Arms and Artists, the lives of the five great American artists of the Revolutionary period–Charles Willson Peale, John Singleton Copley, John Trumbull, Benjamin West, and Gilbert Stuart–were every bit as eventful as those of the Founders with whom they continually interacted, and their works contributed mightily to America’s founding spirit. Living in a time of breathtaking change, each in his own way came to grips with the history being made by turning to brushes and canvases, the results often eliciting awe and praise, and sometimes scorn. Ever since the passing of the last eyewitnesses to the Revolution, their imagery has connected Americans to 1776, allowing us to interpret and reinterpret the nation’s beginning generation after generation. The collective stories of these five artists open a fresh window on the Revolutionary era, making more human the figures we have long honored as our Founders, and deepening our understanding of the whirlwind out of which the United States emerged.

Our July lectures sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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July 7, 2 pm: Gioia Dimock, “Whaling in Massachusetts”

Massachusetts’ Whaling History in Vintage Photographs
whaling in massachusetts
The popular novel Moby-Dick first spurred young and old alike to romanticize the whaling industry. Author Herman Melville wrote his story based on the exploits of the Essex whaleship, and he documented his travels aboard the Acushnet, which departed from a Massachusetts whaling port. In the early 1700s, Massachusetts residents caught whales from the shore before embarking on offshore voyages for several weeks. Later, these trips would extend over many years, bringing home an average of 1,500 barrels of whale oil and thousands of pounds of whalebone in the 1800s. New Bedford and Nantucket were the founding towns for the whaling industry, but little known are the other Massachusetts towns that sent out whalers, built the ships, and outfitted them. Essex, Mattapoisett, and Falmouth were shipbuilding communities; Fairhaven began as a whaling town but quickly took to outfitting whalers; Gloucester made the yellow slickers that were rubbed with sperm whale oil to waterproof them; and Provincetown and Boston were among the many ports that sent out whaling ships.

Our July lectures sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

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June 29, 7 pm: Terry Ann Knopf, “The Golden Age of Boston Television”

Golden Age of Boston TelevisionThere are some two hundred TV markets in the country, but only one—Boston, Massachusetts—hosted a Golden Age of local programming. In this lively insider account, Terry Ann Knopf chronicles the development of Boston television, from its origins in the 1970s through its decline in the early 1990s. During TV’s heyday, not only was Boston the nation’s leader in locally produced news, programming, and public affairs, but it also became a model for other local stations around the country. It was a time of award-winning local newscasts, spirited talk shows, thought-provoking specials and documentaries, ambitious public service campaigns, and even originally produced TV films featuring Hollywood stars. Knopf also shows how this programming highlighted aspects of Boston’s own history over two turbulent decades, including the treatment of highly charged issues of race, sex, and gender—and the stations’ failure to challenge the Roman Catholic Church during its infamous sexual abuse scandal.

Laced with personal insights and anecdotes, The Golden Age of Boston Television offers an intimate look at how Boston’s television stations refracted the city’s culture in unique ways, while at the same time setting national standards for television creativity and excellence.

Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod logoOur June lectures are sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod

June 27, 7 pm: Michael Tougias, combo program: “The Finest Hours” and “So Close to Home”

michael-tougiasNY Times bestselling Author Michael Tougias will appear at the Falmouth Museums on the Green on Tuesday, June 27 at 7 pm. . He will give a two part multi-media presentation.  The first part covers his new book So Close To Home: A True Story of an American Family’s Fight for Survival During WWII.  The second part of the program features his bestseller The Finest Hours: The True Story of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Most Daring Sea Rescue.  The Disney Corporation has made a movie based on the book, starring Chris Pine and Casey Affleck.  The program is suitable for all ages.

michael-tougias-2 For The Finest Hours, Tougias will use slides of the storm, the sinking oil tankers, the rescues, the victims, the survivors and the heroes to tell the story of this historic event which took place in February of 1952.  He will describe the harrowing attempts to rescue the seamen, especially focusing on four young Coast Guardsmen who must overcome insurmountable odds to save the lives of 32 crewmen stranded aboard the stern of the Pendleton. Standing between the men and their mission were towering waves that reached 70 feet, blinding snow, and one of the most dangerous shoals in the world, the dreaded Chatham Bar. The waters along the outer arm of Cape Cod are called “the graveyard of the Atlantic” for good reason, yet this rescue defies all odds.

Tougias says, “This event was–and still is– the greatest and most daring sea rescue ever performed by the Coast Guard, and it happened right here off the New England coast.  I felt this episode of heroism and tragedy needed to be told in its entirety because it’s an important piece of overlooked history.

   For So Close To Home, Tougias will also tell the story through a series of slides.  Thismichael-tougias-1 event happened in the Gulf of Mexico in 1942 when a Uboat sank a ship carrying the Downs family.  Tougias describes the family’s incredible fight for survival adrift at sea, but also includes the story of the daring Uboat commander who patrolled the Gulf, even going into the mouth of the Mississippi River. A book signing will follow the program.

            “I enjoy doing these programs,” says Tougias, “because I like to transport the audience into the heart of the storm so that they ask themselves ‘what would I have done.’  I don’t like to do author readings because I think they are boring, but with a slide presentation, the viewer can visually relive the adventure.”

Michael Tougias is the author and coauthor of 24 books including Fatal Forecast: An Incredible True Tale of Disaster and Survival at Sea, which the Los Angeles Times called “breathtaking…a marvelous and terrifying tale.” Tougias’ previous book Ten Hours Until Dawn: The True Story of Heroism and Tragedy Aboard the Can Do During the Blizzard of ‘78 received an Editor’s Choice Selection from the American Library Association which selected it as one of the top books of the year.

Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod logoOur June lectures are sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod

June 22, 7 pm: Robert Strauss, “Worst. President. Ever”

worst-president-everWorst. President. Ever. flips the great presidential biography on its head, offering an enlightening—and highly entertaining!—account of poor James Buchanan’s presidency to prove once and for all that, well, few leaders could have done worse.

But author Robert Strauss does much more, leading readers out of Buchanan’s terrible term in office—meddling in the Dred Scott Supreme Court decision, exacerbating the Panic of 1857, helping foment the John Brown uprisings and “Bloody Kansas,” virtually inviting a half-dozen states to secede from the Union as a lame duck, and on and on—to explore with insight and humor his own obsession with presidents, and ultimately the entire notion of ranking our presidents. He guides us through the POTUS rating game of historians and others who have made their own Mount Rushmores—or Marianas Trenches!—of presidential achievement, showing why Buchanan easily loses to any of the others, but also offering insights into presidential history buffs like himself, the forgotten “lesser” presidential sites, sex and the presidency, the presidency itself, and how and why it can often take the best measures out of even the most dedicated men.

Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod logoOur June lectures are sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod

Heritage Award Dinner: Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Established in 2000 to mark the 100th anniversary of the Historical Society, the award recognizes individuals or organizations who have provided outstanding leadership over time to help preserve the character, culture, stories, vistas or other aspect of Falmouth’s rich history, or have inspired others to do so, resulting in a lasting legacy.

In 2017, we will be honoring two groups who work for the beautification and betterment of  Falmouth!

Our 2017 Heritage Award Recipients:

The Falmouth Garden Club: Founded in 1931 and working with the Falmouth Historical Society since 1947, the Falmouth Garden Club is one of the oldest and largest clubs in the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts. Throughout its 86 year history, the club has contributed to the civic and residential communities, centering their projects and workshops on horticulture, conservation and design.

Old Stone Dock Association: For over 50 years this neighborhood association has worked with town leaders for improvements in beautification, safety, and road maintenance around Surf Drive Beach and Bathhouse on behalf of all Falmouth residents.  In recognition of the 200th anniversary of the Old Stone Dock (1817-2017), the members of the Association have worked to create town-wide appreciation for that piece of our maritime heritage.

Each honoree has contributed to Falmouth’s culture by their work at community improvement and beautification. We salute both of these hard-working organizations!

 

The 2017 Heritage Award Dinner will be held on Wednesday, June 21st at the Coonamessett Inn, Falmouth. Dinner will be chicken piccatta or, if needed, a vegetarian option.

To purchase tickets, click below:


Heritage Dinner June 21, 2017
Dinner Choice







 

 

 

 

Thursday, June 15, 7 pm: Larry Loftis, “In the Lion’s Mouth: The True Story of Dusko Popov”

PopovJames Bond has nothing on British double agent Dusko Popov.  As an operative for the Abwehr, SD, MI5, MI6, and FBI during World War II, Popov seduced countless women―including agents on both sides―spoke five languages, and was a crack shot, all while maintaining his cover as a Yugoslav diplomat...

On a cool August evening in 1941, a Serbian playboy created a stir at Casino Estoril in Portugal by throwing down an outrageously large baccarat bet to humiliate his opponent. The Serbian was a British double agent, and the money―which he had just stolen from the Germans―belonged to the British. From the sideline, watching with intent interest was none other than Ian Fleming…The Serbian was Dusko Popov. As a youngster, he was expelled from his London prep school. Years later he would be arrested and banished from Germany for making derogatory statements about the Third Reich. When World War II ensued, the playboy became a spy, eventually serving three dangerous masters: the Abwehr, MI5 and MI6, and the FBI.
On August 10, 1941, the Germans sent Popov to the United States to construct a spy network and gather information on Pearl Harbor. The FBI ignored his German questionnaire, but J. Edgar Hoover succeeded in blowing his cover. While MI5 desperately needed Popov to deceive the Abwehr about the D-Day invasion, they assured him that a return to the German Secret Service Headquarters in Lisbon would result in torture and execution. He went anyway…
Into the Lion’s Mouth is a globe-trotting account of a man’s entanglement with espionage, murder, assassins, and lovers―including enemy spies and a Hollywood starlet. It is a story of subterfuge and seduction, patriotism, and cold-blooded courage. It is the story of Dusko Popov―the inspiration for James Bond.

Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod logoOur June lectures are sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod

June 14, 7 pm: Nigel Hamilton, “Commander in Chief: FDR’s Battle with Churchill”

commander-in-chiefNigel Hamilton’s Mantle of Command, long-listed for the National Book Award, drew on years of archival research and interviews to portray FDR in a tight close up, as he determined Allied strategy in the crucial initial phases of World War II. Commander in Chief reveals the astonishing sequel — suppressed by Winston Churchill in his memoirs — of Roosevelt’s battles with Churchill to maintain that strategy.  Roosevelt knew that the Allies should take Sicily but avoid a wider battle in southern Europe, building experience but saving strength to invade France in early 1944. Churchill seemed to agree at Casablanca — only to undermine his own generals and the Allied command, testing Roosevelt’s patience to the limit. Churchill was afraid of the invasion planned for Normandy, and pushed instead for disastrous fighting in Italy, thereby almost losing the war for the Allies. In a dramatic showdown, FDR finally set the ultimate course for victory by making the ultimate threat. Commander in Chief shows FDR in top form at a crucial time in the modern history of the West.

Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod logoOur June lectures are sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod

June 10, 2 pm: Stephen Kinzer, “The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain and the Birth of American Empire”

True FlagHow should the United States act in the world? Americans cannot decide. Sometimes we burn with righteous anger, launching foreign wars and deposing governments. Then we retreat―until the cycle begins again.

No matter how often we debate this question, none of what we say is original. Every argument is a pale shadow of the first and greatest debate, which erupted more than a century ago. Its themes resurface every time Americans argue whether to intervene in a foreign country.

Revealing a piece of forgotten history, Stephen Kinzer transports us to the dawn of the twentieth century, when the United States first found itself with the chance to dominate faraway lands. That prospect thrilled some Americans. It horrified others. Their debate gripped the nation.

The country’s best-known political and intellectual leaders took sides. Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, and William Randolph Hearst pushed for imperial expansion; Mark Twain, Booker T. Washington, and Andrew Carnegie preached restraint. Only once before―in the period when the United States was founded―have so many brilliant Americans so eloquently debated a question so fraught with meaning for all humanity.

All Americans, regardless of political perspective, can take inspiration from the titans who faced off in this epic confrontation. Their words are amazingly current. Every argument over America’s role in the world grows from this one. It all starts here.

Our March lectures are sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit UnionFirst Citizens

June 7, 7 pm: Michael Klarman, “The Framers’ Coup: The Making of the American Constitution”

framers-coupBoth the Constitution’s content and its ratification process raise troubling questions about democratic legitimacy. The Federalists were eager to avoid full-fledged democratic deliberation over the Constitution, and the document that was ratified was stacked in favor of their preferences. And in terms of substance, the Constitution was a significant departure from the more democratic state constitutions of the 1770s. Definitive and authoritative, The Framers’ Coup explains why the Framers preferred such a constitution and how they managed to persuade the country to adopt it. We have lived with the consequences, both positive and negative, ever since.
The Framers’ Coup is more than a compendium of great stories, however, and the powerful arguments that feature throughout will reshape our understanding of the nation’s founding. Simply put, the Constitutional Convention almost didn’t happen, and once it happened, it almost failed. And, even after the convention succeeded, the Constitution it produced almost failed to be ratified. Just as importantly, the Constitution was hardly the product of philosophical reflections by brilliant, disinterested statesmen, but rather ordinary interest group politics. Multiple conflicting interests had a say, from creditors and debtors to city dwellers and backwoodsmen. The upper class overwhelmingly supported the Constitution; many working class colonists were more dubious. Slave states and nonslave states had different perspectives on how well the Constitution served their interests.

Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod logoOur June lectures are sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape Cod

 

 

 

May 24, 7 pm: James B. Conroy, “Lincoln’s White House: The People’s House in Wartime”

lincolns-white-houseLincoln’s White House is the first book devoted to capturing the look, feel, and smell of the executive mansion from Lincoln’s inauguration in 1861 to his assassination in 1865. James Conroy brings to life the people who knew it, from servants to cabinet secretaries. We see the constant stream of visitors, from ordinary citizens to visiting dignitaries and diplomats. Conroy enables the reader to see how the Lincolns lived and how the administration conducted day-to-day business during four of the most tumultuous years in American history. Relying on fresh research and a character-driven narrative and drawing on untapped primary sources, he takes the reader on a behind-the-scenes tour that provides new insight into how Lincoln lived, led the government, conducted war, and ultimately, unified the country to build a better government of, by, and for the people.

Our May lectures are sponsored by Cape Cod Five Savings Bank

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Sunday, May 7, 2 pm: Kate Moore, “The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining Women”

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Part of the series of lectures on Women’s History, made possible in part by a grant from Mass Humanities

Radium GirlsThe Curies’ newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War.

Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these “shining girls” are the luckiest alive ― until they begin to fall mysteriously ill.

But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women’s cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America’s early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers’ rights that will echo for centuries to come.

Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, The Radium Girls fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the “wonder” substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives…

Our May lectures are sponsored by Cape Cod Five Savings

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May 6, 7 pm: Allison Lange, “Women’s Suffrage and the Modern Political Campaign”

mass-humanities-logoPART OF THE ‘WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT THIS?’ SERIES OF LECTURES ON WOMEN’S HISTORY, SPONSORED BY MASSHUMANITIES

“Beyond Susan B. Anthony: What You Missed in History Class about the Woman Suffrage Movement”womens-suffrage

Did you know that Victoria Woodhull became the first woman to run for president in 1872? Have you heard of Bostonian Lucy Stone, who published the longest-running and most successful suffrage newspaper? Did you learn that Ida B. Wells defied orders and racially integrated the 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, DC? Have you heard that suffragists staged the first-ever picket of the White House in 1917?

Though Susan B. Anthony is probably the most familiar suffragist, this talk will highlight these important–but less familiar–stories of the movement. Women’s votes aren’t controversial today, but suffragists organized for nearly 100 years to win this right. “Beyond Susan B. Anthony” will feature colorful nineteenth-century political cartoons that lampooned the activists as well as the visual propaganda that suffragists created to convince Americans that women needed the vote. In 2020, we will commemorate the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, which granted women the right to cast ballots. Let’s celebrate the suffragists with a better understanding of all that they accomplished.

Our May Lectures are sponsored by Cape Cod Five Savings Bank

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May 2, 7 pm: Douglas Smith, “Rasputin: Faith, Power and the Twilight of the Romanovs”

rasputinA hundred years after his murder, Rasputin continues to excite the popular imagination as the personification of evil. Numerous biographies, novels, and films recount his mysterious rise to power as Nicholas and Alexandra’s confidant and the guardian of the sickly heir to the Russian throne. His debauchery and sinister political influence are the stuff of legend, and the downfall of the Romanov dynasty was laid at his feet.

But as the prizewinning historian Douglas Smith shows, the true story of Rasputin’s life and death has remained shrouded in myth. A major new work that combines probing scholarship and powerful storytelling, Rasputin separates fact from fiction to reveal the real life of one of history’s most alluring figures. Drawing on a wealth of forgotten documents from archives in seven countries, Smith presents Rasputin in all his complexity–man of God, voice of peace, loyal subject, adulterer, drunkard. Rasputin is not just a definitive biography of an extraordinary and legendary man but a fascinating portrait of the twilight of imperial Russia as it lurched toward catastrophe.

RocklandTrust logoThis lecture sponsored by Rockland Trust

 

 

 

 

 

April 27, 7 pm: Larrie Ferriero, “Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France & Spain Who Saved It”

brothers-at-armsIn this groundbreaking, revisionist history, Larrie Ferreiro shows that at the time the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord the colonists had little chance, if any, of militarily defeating the British. The nascent American nation had no navy, little in the way of artillery, and a militia bereft even of gunpowder. In his detailed accounts Ferreiro shows that without the extensive military and financial support of the French and Spanish, the American cause would never have succeeded. France and Spain provided close to the equivalent of $30 billion and 90 percent of all guns used by the Americans, and they sent soldiers and sailors by the thousands to fight and die alongside the Americans, as well as around the world.

Ferreiro adds to the historical records the names of French and Spanish diplomats, merchants, soldiers, and sailors whose contribution is at last given recognition. Instead of viewing the American Revolution in isolation, Brothers at Arms reveals the birth of the American nation as the centerpiece of an international coalition fighting against a common enemy.

RocklandTrust logoOur April lectures are sponsored by Rockland Trust

April 25, 7 pm: J. L Bell, “The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War”

road-to-concordIn the early spring of 1775, on a farm in Concord, Massachusetts, British army spies located four brass cannon belonging to Boston’s colonial militia that had gone missing months before. British general Thomas Gage had been searching for them, both to stymie New England’s growing rebellion and to erase the embarrassment of having let cannon disappear from armories under redcoat guard. Anxious to regain those weapons, he drew up plans for his troops to march nineteen miles into unfriendly territory. The Massachusetts Patriots, meanwhile, prepared to thwart the general’s mission. There was one goal Gage and his enemies shared: for different reasons, they all wanted to keep the stolen cannon as secret as possible. Both sides succeeded well enough that the full story has never appeared until now.
The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War by historian J. L. Bell reveals a new dimension to the start of America’s War for Independence by tracing the spark of its first battle back to little-known events beginning in September 1774. The author relates how radical Patriots secured those four cannon and smuggled them out of Boston, and how Gage sent out spies and search parties to track them down. Drawing on archives in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, the book creates a lively, original, and deeply documented picture of a society perched on the brink of war.
RocklandTrust logoOur April lectures are sponsored by Rockland Trust

April 21, 3 pm: Chandra Manning, “Troubled Refuge: Struggling for Freedom in the Civil War”

PART OF THE ‘WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT THIS?’ SERIES OF LECTURES ON WOMEN’S HISTORY, SPONSORED BY MASSHUMANITIESmass-humanities-logo

Even before shots were fired at Fort Sumter, slaves recognized that their bondage was at the root of the war they knew was coming, and they began running to the Union army. By the war’s end, nearly half a million had taken refuge behind Union lines in improvised “contraband camps.” These were crowded and dangerous places, with conditions approaching those of a humanitarian crisis. Yet families and individuals—some 12 to 15 percent of the Confederacy’s slave population—took unimaginable risks to reach them, and they became the first places where many Northerners would come to know former slaves en masse, with reverberating consequences for emancipation, its progress, and troubled-refugethe Reconstruction that followed.

Drawing on records of the Union and Confederate armies, the letters and diaries of soldiers, transcribed testimonies of former slaves, and more, Chandra Manning allows us to accompany the black men, women, and children who sought out the Union army in hopes of achieving autonomy for themselves and their communities. Ranging from the stories of individuals to those of armies on the move to debates in the halls of Congress, Troubled Refuge probes the particular and deeply significant reality of the contraband camps: what they were really like and how former slaves and Union soldiers warily united there, forging a dramatically new but highly imperfect alliance between the government and African Americans. That alliance, which would outlast the war, helped destroy slavery and warded off the very acute and surprisingly tenacious danger of re-enslavement. It also raised, for the first time, humanitarian questions about refugees in wartime and legal questions about civil and military authority with which we still wrestle, as well as redefined American citizenship, to the benefit but also to the lasting cost of African Americans.

Mass Cultural Logo 2This lecture made possible in part by a grant from the Falmouth Cultural Council and the Massachusetts Cultural Council

April 19, 6:30 pm: Roseann Sdoia, “Perfect Strangers: Friendship, Strength and Recovery after Boston’s Worst Day”

Roseann SdoiaAs Roseann Sdoia waited to watch her friend cross the finish line of the Boston Marathon in 2013, she had no idea her life was about to change-that in a matter of minutes she would look up from the sidewalk, burned and deaf, staring at her detached foot, screaming for help amid the smoke and blood.
In the chaos of the minutes that followed, three people would enter Roseann’s life and change it forever. The first was Shores Salter, a college student who, when the bomb went off, instinctively ran into the smoke while his friends ran away. He found Roseann lying on the sidewalk and, using a belt as a tourniquet, literally saved her life that day. Then, Boston police officer Shana Cottone arrived on the scene and began screaming desperately at passing ambulances, all full, before finally commandeering an empty paddy wagon. Just then a giant appeared, in the form of Boston firefighter Mike Materia, who carefully lifted her into the fetid paddy wagon. He climbed in and held her burned hand all the way to the hospital. Since that day, he hasn’t left her side, and today they are planning their life together.Perfect Strangers is about recovery, about choosing joy and human connection over anger and resentment, and most of all, it’s about an unlikely but enduring friendship that grew out of the tragedy of Boston’s worst day.

This lecture sponsored by Rockland TrustRocklandTrust logo

April 11, 7 pm: Nina Sankovitch, “The Lowell’s of Massachusetts”


PART OF THE ‘WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT THIS?’ SERIES OF LECTURES ON mass-humanities-logoWOMEN’S HISTORY, SPONSORED BY MASSHUMANITIES

 

The Lowells of Massachusetts were a remarkable family. They were settlers in the New World in the 1600s, revolutionaries creating a new nation in the 1700s, merchants and manufacturers building prosperity in the 1800s, and scientists and artists flourishing in the 1900s. For the first time, Nina Sankovitch tells the story of this fascinating and powerful dynasty in The Lowells of Massachusetts.

lowells-of-massachusettsThough not without scoundrels and certainly no strangers to controversy , the family boasted some of the most astonishing individuals in America’s history: Percival Lowle, the patriarch who arrived in America in the seventeenth to plant the roots of the family tree; Reverend John Lowell, the preacher; Judge John Lowell, a member of the Continental Congress; Francis Cabot Lowell, manufacturer and, some say, founder of the Industrial Revolution in the US; James Russell Lowell, American Romantic poet; Lawrence Lowell, one of Harvard’s longest-serving and most controversial presidents; and Amy Lowell, the twentieth century poet who lived openly in a Boston Marriage with the actress Ada Dwyer Russell.

The Lowells realized the promise of America as the land of opportunity by uniting Puritan values of hard work, community service, and individual responsibility with a deep-seated optimism that became a well-known family trait. Long before the Kennedys put their stamp on Massachusetts, the Lowells claimed the bedrock.

RocklandTrust logoOur April lectures are sponsored by Rockland Trust

April 6, 7 pm: Michele McPhee: “Maximum Harm: The Tsarnaev Brothers, the FBI and the Road to the Marathon Bombing”

michele-mcpheeVeteran investigative journalist Michele R. McPhee unravels the complex story behind the public facts of the Boston Marathon bombing. She examines the bombers’ roots in Dagestan and Chechnya, their struggle to assimilate in America, and their growing hatred of the United States—a deepening antagonism that would prompt federal prosecutors to dub Dzhokhar Tsarnaev “America’s worst nightmare.” The difficulties faced by the Tsarnaev family of Cambridge, Massachusetts, are part of the public record. Circumstances less widely known are the FBI’s recruitment of the older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, as a “mosque crawler” to inform on radical separatists here and in Chechnya; the tracking down and killing of radical Islamic separatists during the six months he spent in Russia—travel that raised eyebrows, since he was on several terrorist watchlists; the FBI’s botched deals and broken promises with regard to his immigration; and the disenchantment, rage, and growing radicalization of Tamerlan and Dzhokhar, along with their mother, sisters, and Tamerlan’s wife, Katherine.

Maximum Harm is also a compelling examination of the Tsarnaev brothers’ movements in the days leading up to the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013, the subsequent investigation, the Tsarnaevs’ murder of MIT police officer Sean Collier, the high-speed chase and shootout that killed Tamerlan, and the manhunt in which the authorities finally captured Dzhokhar, hiding in a Watertown backyard. McPhee untangles the many threads of circumstance, coincidence, collusion, motive, and opportunity that resulted in the deadliest attack on the city of Boston to date.

RocklandTrust logoOur April lectures are sponsored by Rockland Trust

April 4, 2 pm: Sen. George Mitchell, “A Path to Peace” (to be held at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church)

“A Path to Peace: A Brief History of Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations and a Way Forward in the Middle East”

THIS LECTURE TO BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 81 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

george-mitchellGeorge Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the primary architect of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement for peace in Northern Ireland. But when he served as US Special Envoy for Middle East Peace from 2009 to 2011—working to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—diplomacy did not prevail. Now, for the first time, Mitchell offers his insider account of how the Israelis and the Palestinians have progressed (and regressed) in their negotiations through the years and outlines the specific concessions each side must make to finally achieve lasting peace. This unflinching look at why the peace process has failed, and what must happen for it to succeed, is an important, essential, and valuable insight as to how the process works.

RocklandTrust logoOur April lectures are sponsored by Rockland Trust

Thursday, March 30, 7 pm: Steven Watts, “JFK and the Masculine Mystique”

jfkFrom very early on in his career, John F. Kennedy’s allure was more akin to a movie star than a presidential candidate. Why were Americans so attracted to Kennedy in the late 1950s and early 1960s―his glamorous image, good looks, cool style, tough-minded rhetoric, and sex appeal?

As Steve Watts argues, JFK was tailor made for the cultural atmosphere of his time. He benefited from a crisis of manhood that had welled up in postwar America when men had become ensnared by bureaucracy, softened by suburban comfort, and emasculated by a generation of newly-aggressive women. Kennedy appeared to revive the modern American man as youthful and vigorous, masculine and athletic, and a sexual conquistador. His cultural crusade involved other prominent figures, including Frank Sinatra, Norman Mailer, Ian Fleming, Hugh Hefner, Ben Bradlee, Kirk Douglas, and Tony Curtis, who collectively symbolized masculine regeneration.

JFK and the Masculine Mystique is not just another standard biography of the youthful president. By examining Kennedy in the context of certain books, movies, social critiques, music, and cultural discussions that framed his ascendancy, Watts shows us the excitement and sense of possibility, the optimism and aspirations, that accompanied the dawn of a new age in America.

Our March lectures are sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit UnionFirst Citizens

Saturday, March 25, 2 pm: Tom Farmer and Marty Foley, “A Murder in Wellesley”

greiniderOn Halloween morning in 1999, Mabel Greineder was savagely murdered along a wooded trail in the well-heeled community of Wellesley, Massachusetts. As the shock following the brutal killing slowly subsided, the community was further shaken when the focus of the investigation turned to her husband, Dirk Greineder, a prominent physician and family man who was soon revealed to be leading a secret double life involving prostitutes, pornography, and trysts solicited through the Internet.

A Murder in Wellesley takes the reader far beyond the headlines and national news coverage spawned by “May” Greineder’s killing and tells the untold story of the meticulous investigation led by Marty Foley, the lead State Police detective on the case, from the morning of the murder through Dirk Greineder’s ultimate conviction. Exhaustive interviews with key figures in the case, including many who have not talked publicly until now, contribute to an unprecedented behind-the-scenes account of how investigators methodically built their case against Greineder and how the sides taken by Dirk and May’s relatives aided the investigation but bitterly divided their families.

A fascinating true-crime procedural that is also a deeply unsettling tale of the psychopath you thought you knew, of deceptions and double lives, and of families torn apart by an unthinkable crime. Culminating in one of the most dramatic courtroom spectacles in recent memory (aired nationally on Court TV), A Murder in Wellesley reveals the truth behind the murder that gripped a nation.

Our March lectures are sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit UnionFirst Citizens

March 22, 7 pm: Larry Tye: “Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon” (To be Held at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, 81 Main Street, Falmouth)

bobby-kennedyHistory remembers Robert F. Kennedy as a racial healer, a tribune for the poor, and the last progressive knight of a bygone era of American politics. But Kennedy’s enshrinement in the liberal pantheon was actually the final stage of a journey that had its beginnings in the conservative 1950s. In Bobby Kennedy, Larry Tye peels away layers of myth and misconception to paint a complete portrait of this singularly fascinating figure.

To capture the full arc of his subject’s life, Tye draws on unpublished memoirs, unreleased government files, and fifty-eight boxes of papers that had been under lock and key for the past forty years. He conducted hundreds of interviews with RFK intimates—including Bobby’s widow, Ethel, his sister Jean, and his aide John Siegenthaler—many of whom have never spoken to another biographer. Tye’s determination to sift through the tangle of often contradictory opinions means that Bobby Kennedy will stand as the definitive one-volume biography of a man much beloved, but just as often misunderstood.

Bobby Kennedy’s transformation from cold warrior to fiery liberal is a profoundly moving personal story that also offers a lens onto two of the most chaotic and confounding decades of twentieth-century American history. The first half of RFK’s career underlines what the country was like in the era of Eisenhower, while his last years as a champion of the underclass reflect the seismic shifts wrought by the 1960s. Nurtured on the rightist orthodoxies of his dynasty-building father, Bobby Kennedy began his public life as counsel to the red-baiting senator Joseph McCarthy. He ended it with a noble campaign to unite working-class whites with poor blacks and Latinos in an electoral coalition that seemed poised to redraw the face of presidential politics. Along the way, he turned up at the center of every event that mattered, from the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis to race riots and Vietnam.

Our March lectures are sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit UnionFirst Citizens

March 16, 7 pm: Stephen Puleo, “American Treasures” (to be held at St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, 81 Main Street, Falmouth)

american-treasures

On December 26, 1941, Secret Service Agent Harry E. Neal stood on a platform at Washington’s Union Station, watching a train chug off into the dark and feeling at once relieved and inexorably anxious. These were dire times: as Hitler’s armies plowed across Europe, seizing or destroying the Continent’s historic artifacts at will, Japan bristled to the East. The Axis was rapidly closing in.

So FDR set about hiding the country’s valuables. On the train speeding away from Neal sat four plain-wrapped cases containing the documentary history of American democracy: the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Gettysburg Address, and more, guarded by a battery of agents and bound for safekeeping in the nation’s most impenetrable hiding place.

American Treasures charts the little-known journeys of these American crown jewels. From the risky and audacious adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to our modern Fourth of July celebrations, American Treasures shows how the ideas captured in these documents underscore the nation’s strengths and hopes, and embody its fundamental values of liberty and equality. Stephen Puleo weaves in exciting stories of freedom under fire – from the Declaration and Constitution smuggled out of Washington days before the British burned the capital in 1814, to their covert relocation during WWII – crafting a sweeping history of a nation united to preserve its definition of democracy.

The lecture made possible in part by a grant from First Citizens Federal Credit UnionFirst Citizens

March 9, 3 pm: Vasco Pires, “Cape Verdean History”

 

PART OF THE ‘WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT THIS?’ SERIES OF LECTURES ON WOMEN’S HISTORY, SPONSORED BY MASSHUMANITIESmass-humanities-logo

 

 

 

How the Cape Verdean Community helped to shape Falmouth and Cape Cod

Vasco Pires lecture

On September 18, 2010 Vasco Pires was invited to an international Conference in the city
of Noli, Italy to present a paper on the “550 Year History of Cabo Verde and its
impact on the United States.” He shares with you a presentation based on that paper
presented at the Antoni DiNoli Conference in Noli, Italy and published in The
Conference Book.
“ 550 years seems like a long time, however this period, a mere five and half centuries
when condensed into a series of experiences and accounts, a history that has affected
our world, like no other period.
If history has any value at all, it should teach us how we have allowed, our greed,
stupidity and foolishness to rule our actions in creating misery and destruction to our
fellow human beings and environment, all in the name of religion or the quest for power
and dominion over others.”

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First CitizensOur March lectures are sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit Union

Help Us Fund Our Fence!

PLEASE HELP CHANGE THIS:  TO THIS:

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Our goal is to install one fence style along Palmer Avenue in front of the 1790 Dr. Francis Wicks House and the 1730 Conant House so that both properties are identifiable as part of the Museums on the Green. We will be constructing an historically appropriate design that will be durable and not subject to splitting and rot. As we are in historic district, it will be made from cedar and stained white.

Here is how you can help:

Pickets: Over 400 Opportunities!

$ 30 for one picket/ $ 80 for 3 pickets

Horizontal Sections: $ 100 each

Posts: $ 200 each

Gates with Posts: 2 posts for $ 1000.00 each/ 1 post for $ 1500.00

To participate in this opportunity to upgrade our fencing and increase our ‘curb appeal’, please make a payment to Falmouth Historical Society, PO Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541, or simply click below. Your gift will be acknowledged in the Annual Report. Names will not be appearing on the fence itself. We truly appreciate all gifts of all sizes. Your gift is tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. If you have questions, call 508-548-4857 and ask for Executive Director Mark Schmidt. 




 

Special Performance: Feb. 24, 2 pm: “My Wife Abigail Adams, the First Modern American Woman”

PART OF THE ‘WHY DIDN’T I KNOW ABOUT THIS?’ SERIES OF LECTURES ON WOMEN’S HISTORY, SPONSORED BY MASSHUMANITIESmass-humanities-logo

 

 

 

The historical figure of John Adams,george-baker portrayed by George Baker, will present his views of the nation, history and family life in a humorous and inspiring speech. He will be dressed in the clothes he would have worn as the Second President of the United States 1797-1801.

John Adams talks with admiration, humor and affection about his wife, Abigail Adams, the First Modern American Woman and describes how Abigail defied the sexist conventions of her time, that married women could not own property, and with her amazing financial skills and insights made the Adams family prosperous.  She helped found the new nation and raised their son, John Quincy Adams, to become President.  This program is full of details of Abigail’s life which most people don’t know.  It is told from the perspective of a husband talking about his wife, and contains the story of their romance, challenges, trials and accomplishments which makes them sound like ordinary people living in extraordinary times.
To purchase tickets, click below:


Special Performance: “My Wife Abigail Adams”



 

February 17, 3 pm: Kevin Gutzman, “Thomas Jefferson: Revolutionary”

thomasjefferson_revolutionaryThough remembered chiefly as author of the Declaration of Independence and the president under whom the Louisiana Purchase was effected, Thomas Jefferson was a true revolutionary in the way he thought about the size and reach of government, which Americans who were full citizens and the role of education in the new country. In his new book, Kevin Gutzman gives readers a new view of Jefferson―a revolutionary who effected radical change in a growing country.

Jefferson’s philosophy about the size and power of the federal system almost completely undergirded the Jeffersonian Republican Party. His forceful advocacy of religious freedom was not far behind, as were attempts to incorporate Native Americans into American society. His establishment of the University of Virginia might be one of the most important markers of the man’s abilities and character.

He was not without flaws. While he argued for the assimilation of Native Americans into society, he did not assume the same for Africans being held in slavery while―at the same time―insisting that slavery should cease to exist. Many still accuse Jefferson of hypocrisy on the ground that he both held that “all men are created equal” and held men as slaves. Jefferson’s true character, though, is more complex than that as Kevin Gutzman shows in his new book about Jefferson, a revolutionary whose accomplishments went far beyond the drafting of the Declaration of Independence.

January 20, 1 pm: Paula Reed Ward, “Death by Cyanide: The Murder of Dr. Autumn Klein

death-by-cyanideAt just forty-one years old, Dr. Autumn Klein, a neurologist specializing in seizure disorders in pregnant women, had already been named chief of women’s neurology at Pittsburgh’s largest health system. More than just successful in her field, Dr. Klein was beloved—by her patients, colleagues, family, and friends. She collapsed suddenly on April 17, 2013, writhing in agony on her kitchen floor, and died three days later. The police said her husband, Dr. Robert Ferrante, twenty-three years Klein’s senior, killed her through cyanide poisoning. Though Ferrante left a clear trail of circumstantial evidence, Klein’s death from cyanide might have been overlooked if not for the investigators who were able to use Ferrante’s computer, statements from the staff at his lab, and his own seemingly odd actions at the hospital during his wife’s treatment to piece together what appeared to be a long-term plan to end his wife’s life.

In Death by Cyanide, Paula Reed Ward, reporter for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, describes the murder investigation and the trial in this sensational case, taking us from the poisoning and the medical staff’s heroic measures to save Klein’s life to the investigation of Ferrante and the emotion and drama inside the courtroom.

Wednesday, Dec. 7, 7:30 pm: Michael Holley: “Belichick and Brady: Two Men, the Patriots, and How They Revolutionized Football”

The epic, inside story of the rise and dominance of Tom Brady, Bill Belichick, and the New England Patriots. 

SPECIAL STARTING TIME: 7:30 pm

THIS LECTURE TO BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 91 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Belichick & Brady
Featuring interviews from Patriots players and coaches,WEEI’s Michael Holley presents a fascinating portrait of the partnership between Tom Brady, the Patriots’ star quarterback, and Bill Belichick, the team’s prolific coach. Chockful of behind-the-scenes anecdotes and information exploring how they have strategized and weathered controversies, all culminating into four Superbowl rings, this is required reading for any Patriots fan and students of the game of football.
By examining how the relationship between this dynamic quarterback and coach duo, Holley explores exactly how these two men have formed the core of the greatest dynasty in the modern-day NFL.

Thursday, December 8, 5-8 pm: Holiday Pop-Up Boutique with Cape Cod Winery

Join us in the Cultural Center for a festive and relaxed evening of local shopping and tastings from Cape Cod Winery. Stock up on unique gifts for the whole family from Cape Cod artists, artisans, and farmers. Apparel, artwork, jewelry, jam, and more!

Featuring: Cape Cloth, Cabo Cado, Wampanoag Shells, Wicked Weird Story Starters, Melefant

Woods Hole Woodcuts, Peachtree Circle Farm, Red Buzz Honey, Complexions Skincare, and the Seafoam Pinecone. Follow us on Facebook to see what great gift items are in store! holiday-season-sale

Thursday, November 17, 7 pm: Paul Brandus: “Under This Roof: The White House and the Presidency–21 Presidents, 21 Rooms, 21 Inside Stories”

Under This RoofReporting from the West Wing briefing room since 2008, Brandus—the most followed White House journalist on Twitter (@WestWingReport)—weaves together stories of the presidents, their families, the events of their time—and an oft-ignored major character, the White House itself.
From George Washington—who selected the winning design for the White House—to the current occupant, Barack Obama—the story of the White House is the story of America itself. Through triumph and tragedy, boom and bust, secrets and scandals, Brandus takes you to the presidential bedroom, movie theater, Situation Room, Oval Office and more. Under This Roof is a “sensuous account of the history of both the home of the President, and the men and women who designed, inhabited, and decorated it.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Saturday, November 5, 2 pm: Sven Beckert, “Empire of Cotton: A Global History”

WINNER OF THE BANCROFT PRIZE

PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST

Cotton pickers, 1800s.

Cotton pickers, 1800s.

The empire of cotton was, from the beginning, a fulcrum of constant global struggle between slaves and planters, merchants and statesmen, workers and factory owners. Sven Beckert makes clear how these forces ushered in the world of modern capitalism, including the vast wealth and disturbing inequalities that are with us today.
In a remarkably brief period, European entrepreneurs and powerful politicians recast the world’s most significant manufacturing industry, combining imperial expansion and slave labor with new machines and wage workers to make and remake global capitalism. The result is a book as unsettling as it is enlightening: a book that brilliantly weaves together the story of cotton with how the present global world came to exist.

Thursday, November 3, 7 pm: Robert Cox, “New England Pie: History Under a Crust”

New England PiePie has been a delectable centerpiece of Yankee tables since Europeans first landed on New England’s shores in the seventeenth century. With a satisfying variety of savory and sweet, author Robert Cox takes a bite out of the history of pie and pie-making in the region. From the crackling topmost crust to the bottom layer, explore the origin and evolution of popular ingredients like the Revolutionary roots of the Boston cream. One month at a time, celebrate the seasonal fixings that fill New Englanders’ favorite dessert from apple and cherry to pumpkin and squash. With interviews from local bakers, classic recipes and some modern twists on beloved standards, this mouthwatering history of New England pies offers something for every appetite.

Friday, October 28, 2 pm: Craig Nelson, “Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness”

pearl-harborThe America we live in today was born, not on July 4, 1776, but on December 7, 1941, when an armada of 354 Japanese warplanes supported by aircraft carriers, destroyers, and midget submarines suddenly and savagely attacked the United States, killing 2,403 men—and forced America’s entry into World War II. Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness follows, moment by moment, the sailors, soldiers, pilots, diplomats, admirals, generals, emperor, and president as they engineer, fight, and react to this stunningly dramatic moment in world history.

Beginning in 1914, bestselling author Craig Nelson maps the road to war, beginning with Franklin D. Roosevelt, then the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (and not yet afflicted with polio), attending the laying of the keel of the USS Arizona at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Writing with vivid intimacy, Nelson traces Japan’s leaders as they lurch into ultranationalist fascism, which culminates in their insanely daring yet militarily brilliant scheme to terrify America with one of the boldest attacks ever waged. Within seconds, the country would never be the same.pearl-harbor-poster

In addition to learning the little understood history of how and why Japan attacked Hawaii, we hear an abandoned record player endlessly repeating “Sunrise Serenade” as bombs shatter the decks of the California; we feel cold terror as lanky young American sailors must anxiously choose between staying aboard their sinking ships or diving overboard into harbor waters aflame with burning ship fuel; we watch as Navy wives tearfully hide with their children in caves from a rumored invasion, and we understand the frustration and triumph of a lone American teenager as he shoots down a Japanese bomber, even as the attack destroys hundreds of US airplanes and dozens of ships.

Backed by a research team’s five years of work, which produced nearly a million pages of documents, as well as Nelson’s thorough re-examination of the original evidence assembled by federal investigators, this page-turning and definitive work provides a thrilling blow-by-blow account from both the Japanese and American perspectives, and is historical drama on the grandest scale. Nelson delivers all the terror, chaos, violence, tragedy, and heroism of the attack in stunning detail, and offers surprising conclusions about the tragedy’s unforeseen and resonant consequences that linger even today.

Wednesday, October 19, 7 pm: Danny Orbach, “The Plots Against Hitler”

Plots Against HitlerIn 1933, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. A year later, all parties but the Nazis had been outlawed, freedom of the press was but a memory, and Hitler’s dominance seemed complete. Yet over the next few years, an unlikely clutch of conspirators emerged – soldiers, schoolteachers, politicians, diplomats, theologians, even a carpenter – who would try repeatedly to end the Fuhrer’s genocidal reign. This dramatic and deeply researched book tells the full story of those noble, ingenious, and doomed efforts. This is history at its most suspenseful, as we witness secret midnight meetings, crises of conscience, fierce debates among old friends about whether and how to dismantle Nazism, and the various plots themselves being devised and executed.

Orbach’s fresh research takes advantage of his singular skills as linguist and historian to offer profound insight into the conspirators’ methods, motivations, fears, and hopes. Though we know how this story ends, we’ve had no idea until now how close it came – several times – to ending very differently. The Plots Against Hitler fundamentally alters our view of World War II and sheds bright – even redemptive – light on its darkest days.

Friday, Oct. 14, 5 pm: Heather Hendershot, “Open to Debate: How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on the Firing Line”

Open to DebateWhen Firing Line premiered on American television in 1966, just two years after Barry Goldwater’s devastating defeat, liberalism was ascendant. Though the left seemed to have decisively won the hearts and minds of the electorate, the show’s creator and host, William F. Buckley—relishing his role as a public contrarian—made the case for conservative ideas, believing that his side would ultimately win because its arguments were better. As the founder of the right’s flagship journal, National Review, Buckley spoke to likeminded readers. With Firing Line, he reached beyond conservative enclaves, engaging millions of Americans across the political spectrum.

Each week on Firing Line, Buckley and his guests—the cream of America’s intellectual class, such as Tom Wolfe, Noam Chomsky, Norman Mailer, Henry Kissinger, and Milton Friedman—debated the urgent issues of the day, bringing politics, culture, and economics into American living rooms as never before. Buckley himself was an exemplary host; he never appealed to emotion and prejudice; he engaged his guests with a unique and entertaining combination of principle, wit, fact, a truly fearsome vocabulary, and genuine affection for his adversaries.

Drawing on archival material, interviews, and transcripts, Open to Debate provides a richly detailed portrait of this widely respected ideological warrior, showing him in action as never before. Much more than just the story of a television show, Hendershot’s book provides a history of American public intellectual life from the 1960s through the 1980s—one of the most contentious eras in our history—and shows how Buckley led the way in drawing America to conservatism during those years.

Sunday, October 9: Historic House Tour of Falmouth


museums-on-the-greenThe Inaugural Falmouth Historic Homes Tour is October 9!

Falmouth Museums on the Green, home of the Falmouth Historical Society, is proud to partner with Cape Cod Life to present the Inaugural Falmouth Historic Homes Tour on Sunday, October 9 from noon to 4 PM. This walking tour of Falmouth Village will showcase nine diverse locations, including private homes, inns, and the historic First Congregational Church of Falmouth. Tickets will include a fabulous swag bag full of goodies from local retailers.

TOUR STARTS AT HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S CULTURAL CENTER, 55 PALMER AVENUE. COME THERE TO PICK UP YOUR TICKET AND YOUR SWAG BAG!

Ticket prices are $ 25 in advance of the House Tour and $ 35 on the day of the event. 

Parking for the House Tour will be available in our parking lot off Katharine Lee Bates Road and at the 1st Congregational Church, 68 Main Street, Falmouth. 

To purchase tickets on day of event, come to Museums on the Green’s Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth

Saturday, October 8, 3 pm: Sean McMeekin, “The Ottoman Endgame: War, Revolution and the Making of the Modern Middle East”

Ottoman EndgameBetween 1911 and 1922, a series of wars would engulf the Ottoman Empire and its successor states, in which the central conflict, of course, is World War I—a story we think we know well. As Sean McMeekin shows us in this revelatory new history of what he calls the “wars of the Ottoman succession,” we know far less than we think. The Ottoman Endgame brings to light the entire strategic narrative that led to an unstable new order in postwar Middle East—much of which is still felt today.

McMeekin also brilliantly reconceives our inherited Anglo-French understanding of the war’s outcome and the collapse of the empire that followed. He chronicles the emergence of modern Turkey and the carve-up of the rest of the Ottoman Empire offering a new perspective on such issues as the ethno-religious bloodletting and forced population transfers which attended the breakup of empire, the Balfour Declaration, the toppling of the caliphate, and the partition of Iraq and Syria—bringing the contemporary consequences into clear focus.

Wednesday, October 5, 7 pm: Alice Dreger, “Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists and the Search for Justice in Science”

alice_dregerAn impassioned defense of intellectual freedom and a clarion call to intellectual responsibility, Galileo’s Middle Finger is one American’s eye-opening story of life in the trenches of scientific controversy. For two decades, historian Alice Dreger has led a life of extraordinary engagement, combining activist service to victims of unethical medical research with defense of scientists whose work has outraged identity politics activists. With spirit and wit, Dreger offers in Galileo’s Middle Finger an unforgettable vision of the importance of rigorous truth seeking in today’s America, where both the free press and free scholarly inquiry struggle under dire economic and political threats.

Wednesday, September 28, 7 pm: Nathalia Holt, “Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars”

The riveting true story of the women who launched America into space.

Rise of the Rocket GirlsIn the 1940s and 50s, when the newly minted Jet Propulsion Laboratory needed quick-thinking mathematicians to calculate velocities and plot trajectories, they didn’t turn to male graduates. Rather, they recruited an elite group of young women who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible.
For the first time, Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the stories of these women–known as “human computers”–who broke the boundaries of both gender and science. Based on extensive research and interviews with all the living members of the team, Rise of the Rocket Girls offers a unique perspective on the role of women in science: both where we’ve been, and the far reaches of space to which we’re heading.

Wednesday, September 21, 7 pm: Emerson Baker, “A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience”

Storm of WitchcraftBeginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers–mainly young women–suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.

Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria–but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was “a perfect storm”: a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since.Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak–the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them–and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy

September 20: Bus Trip to Museum of World War II, Natick, MA

On Tuesday, September 20 at 9:00 am, the Museums on the Green will host a bus trip to the Museum of World War II in Natick, MA. The largest and most comprehensive private collection of World War II artifacts found anywhere in the world, the Museum of World War II makes it its mission to uniquely show the human story interwoven with the military and political events thru all of the artifacts that made up life, from everyday, to the most momentous decisions during the war.

Natick

Space is limited for this special event. Tickets for this are $ 60 each and include transportation to and from Natick as well as Museum admission. Lunch will be separate and held at the Natick Mall.

Please send in a check for $ 60 for each person going NO LATER than September 2, 2016. Checks should be made out to: Falmouth Historical Society, PO Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541. You can also pay by credit card below:


Bus Trip to Museum of World War II, Sept. 20 2016



Additionally, each person going must print and sign the Museum of World War II’s waiver form and bring that with them. Please click below to get the form: 

Museum of World War II Waiver Form

Saturday, Sept. 17, 3 pm: Jerry Thornton, “From Darkness to Dynasty: The First 40 Years of the New England Patriots”

Darkness to DynastyLove them or hate them, what the New England Patriots have been able to do over the past fifteen years is nothing short of remarkable. In addition to their four Super Bowl championships, the Patriots have the best coach in the league, a smart and savvy front office, and a future Hall of Fame quarterback who is internationally recognized as the face of the NFL. The longer the Patriots continue to dominate on the field as well as in the media and the American pop culture landscape, the harder it becomes for anyone to remember them as something other than a model franchise and the ultimate paradigm of success and accomplishment.

Anyone, that is, except for Jerry Thornton. It wasn’tJerry Thornton always sunshine and roses for the Patriots; in fact, for the bulk of their existence, it was exactly the opposite. Though difficult to fathom now, the New England Patriots of old weren’t just bad—they were laughably bad. Not so long ago, the Pats were the laughingstock of not only the NFL but also the entire sporting world.

From Darkness to Dynasty tells the unlikely history of the New England Patriots as it has never been told before. From their humble beginnings as a team bought with rainy-day money by a man who had no idea what he was doing to the fateful season that saw them win their first Super Bowl, Jerry Thornton shares the wild, humiliating, unbelievable, and wonderful stories that comprised the first forty years of what would ultimately become the most dominant franchise in NFL history. Witty, hilarious, and brutally honest, From Darkness to Dynasty returns to the thrilling, perilous days of yesteryear—a welcome corrective for those who hate the Patriots and a useful reminder for those who love them that all glory is fleeting.

 

Historic Trolley Tours of Falmouth: Beginning September 7, 2016

HISTORIC TROLLEY TOURS OF FALMOUTH BEGIN SEPTEMBER 7TH!

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED! To make a reservation, call 508-548-4857, ext. 11!

Trolley Tour PhotoEnjoy an historic trolley tour of Falmouth on Wednesday mornings at 10am.  Five different dates are available:  September 7, 14, 21 & 28, as well as October 5.  Trolleys are enclosed and climate-controlled, allowing the tours to take place rain or shine.

These narrated tours will take visitors along some of the oldest thoroughfares in Falmouth, traveling through downtown Falmouth, Falmouth Heights, Woods Hole and other scenic locales, and will engage those on board about the seafaring history of the town. A stop will also be made at Highfield Hall & Gardens.  Tickets for the two-hour excursion are $ 25 for Historical Society members and $ 30 for non-members.  Reservations are required and these tours have sold out in the past.  To make a reservation, email [email protected] or call 508-548-4857. Tours begin and end at the Falmouth Museums on the Green, 55 & 65 Palmer Avenue.  Those taking the tour should be at the Museums’ Hallett Barn no later than 9:45 am the morning of their reservation.

Credit card reservations should be made at least 48 hours in advance to guarantee that there is room on the trolley. To make a reservation via credit card, click below:


Historic Trolley Tours of Falmouth
Historic Trolley Tours of Falmouth
Which Trolley Tour Date Are You Reserving?



 

 

 

August 19, 1:30 pm: Paul Clerici, “A History of the Falmouth Road Race”

Falmouth Road Race“A History of the Falmouth Road Race: Running Cape Cod” written by Massachusetts runner and author Paul C. Clerici – is a thoroughly entertaining and well-researched historical chronicle of the famous seven-mile road race. Featuring over 40 years worth of stories, anecdotes, tales, and tidbits, finally there is a book that tells this compelling story from the beginning. It features nearly 80 photographs that span the decades – some of which published here for the first time – and through dozens of interviews specific for this book, there are countless detailed recollections and insights from the likes of longtime volunteers; sponsors; founder Tommy Leonard; organizers John and Lucia Carroll, Rich and Kathy Sherman; local runners such as Olympic gold medalist Colleen Coyne, NASA astronaut Sunita “Suni” Williams; and legendary athletes including Bill Rodgers, Frank Shorter, Alberto Salazar, Rod Dixon, Craig Virgin, Henry Rono, Joan Benoit Samuelson, Jen Rhines, Lynn Jennings, Lornah Kiplagat, Catherine Ndereba, Craig Blanchette, Tatyana McFadden, Suzy Favor Hamilton, Jordan McNamara, and many others. In addition is a foreword by Tommy Leonard

Wednesday August 10, 7 pm: Ian Toll, “The Conquering Tide: War in the Pacific Islands, 1942-1944”

conquering tideThis masterful history encompasses the heart of the Pacific War―the period between mid-1942 and mid-1944―when parallel Allied counteroffensives north and south of the equator washed over Japan’s far-flung island empire like a “conquering tide,” concluding with Japan’s irreversible strategic defeat in the Marianas. It was the largest, bloodiest, most costly, most technically innovative and logistically complicated amphibious war in history, and it fostered bitter interservice rivalries, leaving wounds that even victory could not heal.Often overlooked, these are the years and fights that decided the Pacific War. Historian Ian W. Toll’s battle scenes―in the air, at sea, and in the jungles―are simply riveting. He also takes the reader into the wartime councils in Washington and Tokyo where politics and strategy often collided, and into the struggle to mobilize wartime production, which was the secret of Allied victory. Brilliantly researched, the narrative is propelled and colored by firsthand accounts―letters, diaries, debriefings, and memoirs―that are the raw material of the telling details, shrewd judgment, and penetrating insight of this magisterial history.

Wednesday, July 20, 7 pm: Charlotte Gordon, “Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter Mary Shelley”

romantic outlawsThis groundbreaking dual biography brings to life a pioneering English feminist and the daughter she never knew. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley have each been the subject of numerous biographies, yet no one has ever examined their lives in one book—until now. In Romantic Outlaws,Charlotte Gordon reunites the trailblazing author who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Romantic visionary who gave the world Frankenstein—two courageous women who should have shared their lives, but instead shared a powerful literary and feminist legacy.

In 1797, less than two weeks after giving birth to her second daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft died, and a remarkable life spent pushing against the boundaries of society’s expectations for women came to an end. But another was just beginning. Wollstonecraft’s daughter Mary was to follow a similarly audacious path. Both women had passionate relationships with several men, bore children out of wedlock, and chose to live in exile outside their native country. Each in her own time fought against the injustices women faced and wrote books that changed literary history. The private lives of both Marys were nothing less than the stuff of great Romantic drama, providing fabulous material for Charlotte Gordon, an accomplished historian and a gifted storyteller. Taking readers on a vivid journey across revolutionary France and Victorian England, she seamlessly interweaves the lives of her two protagonists in alternating chapters, creating a book that reads like a richly textured historical novel. Gordon also paints unforgettable portraits of the men in their lives, including the mercurial genius Percy Shelley, the unbridled libertine Lord Byron, and the brilliant radical William Godwin.

Wednesday, July 27, 7 pm: Manisha Sinha, “The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition”

Slaves CauseReceived historical wisdom casts abolitionists as mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. University of Massachusetts Professor Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave’s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.

Thursday, July 14, 7 pm: Robert Weintraub, “No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog, and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage and Survival in World War II”

No Better FriendFlight technician Frank Williams and Judy, a purebred pointer, met in the most unlikely of places: a World War II internment camp in the Pacific. Judy was a fiercely loyal dog, with a keen sense for who was friend and who was foe, and the pair’s relationship deepened throughout their captivity. When the prisoners suffered beatings, Judy would repeatedly risk her life to intervene. She survived bombings and other near-death experiences and became a beacon not only for Frank but for all the men, who saw in her survival a flicker of hope for their own. Judy’s devotion to those she was interned with was matched by their love for her, which helped keep the men and their dog alive despite the ever-present threat of death by disease or the rifles of the guards. At one point, deep in despair and starvation, Frank contemplated killing himself and the dog to prevent either from watching the other die. But both were rescued, and Judy spent the rest of her life with Frank. She became the war’s only official canine POW, and after she died at age fourteen, Frank couldn’t bring himself to ever have another dog. Their story–of an unbreakable bond forged in the worst circumstances–is one of the great undiscovered sagas of World War II.

July 13: Hydrangea Fest on Cape Cod

Hydrangea Fest

Hydrangeas are the signature flower of Cape Cod, and the inaugural Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival will celebrate these beautiful blue, pink and white blooms at their peak!
Take a glimpse into some of Cape Cod’s most spectacular gardens during the Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival, from July 10-17, 2016. The festival will include tours of all types of private gardens organized by local nonprofits and museums, along with special hydrangea-themed events and promotions.

The Museums on the Green will be a participant in this event as well. Five locations are scheduled to take part on behalf of the Museums, and will be open on Wednesday, July 13, from 10 am to 4 pm. Those locations are:

 

Captain’s Manor Inn, 27 W. Main Street, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

The Inn was originally built in 1849 by Captain Albert Nye as a family home. The second owner, Captain John Robinson Lawrence had a son H. V. Lawrence who became a well known horticulturist and the first florist on Cape Cod.  The grounds of the Inn bear witness to his talents with many unique trees that survive to this day.  The property hosts gardens in the front and back of the Inn on 1.2 acres. There are hydrangeas and azaleas in both the front and back gardens and numerous varieties of day lilies, roses, hostas, bell flowers, peonies, pansies, dahlias etc.

28 Sady’s Lane, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This garden was featured in Cape Cod Home magazine in fall 2015 and be featured in a national gardening magazine in 2017. Visitors will experience surprising vistas and vignettes while strolling the winding garden paths. A stone patio walled by espaliered pear trees and dogwood, archways of beech trees and hydrangea, and a small pond are some of the features of the thirty year old garden. The summer garden includes collections of daylilies, hosta, and hydrangea. Annuals, tropical plants, and container plants accent the garden borders

383 Boxberry Hill Road, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This site and the restored home were part of the original 19th century Silas Hatch Homestead (giving the village the name Hatchville) and became the agricultural center of Falmouth. In the 1920’s it became the largest dairy farm east of the Mississippi and remains of that activity can be found on the property.  Today the Hidden House Farm grows organic vegetables and fruits along with a modest selection of common New England herbs with a bit of a contemporary touch.  It has, say some old timers, more “boxberry trees” on this property than anywhere else. This site was once part of a working farm. The home is not on the main road but fronts on a bridal path that is hidden from view and surrounded by horse farms, 300 acres of local conservation to the east and 600 acres of protected state land to the north.

Palmer House Inn, 81 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

At the Inn, there are four buildings and four small gardens. Before going to see the gardens, stop at the Inn’s side veranda to enjoy lemonade and cookies.  The first, garden is the T.W Burgess Garden that is home to several rabbits and is a cool shady spot for guests to relax on a warm summer’s afternoon. Next, there is the H.D.Thoreau Cottage Garden that gives this secluded cottage suite its own private bit of nature. Third, the Innkeeper’s Cottage garden is a pleasant shade garden located at the back of the inn’s property. Last but not least, one can walk through the inn’s herb garden, where the organically grown herbs are located in individual stone bordered beds. The herbs are used in the inn’s sumptuous breakfasts. We suggest that those coming to view the garden, park at the Falmouth Museums on the Green parking lot on Katharine Lee Bates Road. After parking one can stroll through the Museum’s lovely colonial gardens. Upon exiting the garden gate, turn right and take the sidewalk to the Palmer House Inn.

37 Arthur Street, North Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This is a woodland garden on a 2 acre, hilly site where winding lawns are bordered by mixed beds of flowering trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals.  There are many of the standbys – kousas, vibernums, day lilies, hostas by the dozens, heuchera, peonies, iris, roses, sedges, candelabra primulas, lambs ears, grasses, salvias, ageratum, nicotianas, cannas, astilbes – and some less standard – filipendula, jack in the pulpits, podophyllum.  This years’ experiment is lilies of several kinds, missing for several years because of red beetles but willing to try again.  Wear walking shoes – there are woodland paths down to a pond and uphill to an overview of the largest part of the garden.

Each venue will cost $ 5 to attend per person. Tickets can be purchased at each venue or by going to the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce. You can also purchase tickets here:


Hydrangea Fest
Falmouth venues Hydrangea Fest



To learn more about this event Cape-wide, click on http://www.capecodchamber.org/hydrangea-fest

 

June 30, 6 pm: Sea Shanties with Tom Goux: FREE!

Rum Soaked CrooksIt will be an evening of salty songs on the Falmouth Historical Society lawn, Thursday, June 23, 6:00PM, when The New Bedford Harbor Sea Chantey Chorus and The Shifty Sailors, a musical crew from the Pacific Northwest, join Falmouth’s own Rum-Soaked Crooks for a proper “gam” and sing-song.

Formed in 2000, under the direction of Tom Goux, the 25 voice chorus presents a repertoire that reflects the rich maritime heritage of New Bedford and the region.  Weaving musical traditions connected to New Bedford Harbor and the New England seafarer, their performances feature the chanteys (work songs) of the Yankee sailor and whaler, ballads and ditties of global mariners and songs of coastwise fisherfolk in North America, the Cape Verde Islands and the British Isles.

Shifty SailorsThe Shifty Sailors hail from Whidbey Island – famed and framed in Puget Sound, just northwest of Seattle, Washington.   For over two decades, this group, much like the local singers on the program,  has manifested their passion for maritime history and heritage in collecting and sharing their music  in concert at festivals, civic events, and charitable organizations in Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, California, Oregon, Hawaii, British Columbia, Ireland and, of course, Washington State. The “Shifties” have also found their way to stages in Europe – the Baltic Sea Countries, France, Prague, the British Isles, and Ireland.

The Rum Soaked Crooks  ~ Tom Goux, Jacek Sulanowski, Dan Lanier and Iain Geddes-RumSoakedCrooks– have been cruising the New England shoreline (and beyond) for the last three decades and have inflicted much musical and poetic damage with a pungent mix of sailors’ chanteys, ballads and ditties.  There is often irrefutable evidence left in their wake: victims leaving the scene with toes tapping and choruses ringing in their heads, as they happily hum and whistle all the way home.

 

The Crooks have shared their songs and stories, both historical and contemporary, at festivals and maritime events across the country and in Europe, and have recorded on the Smithsonian-Folkways and Whaling City Sound labels.  Their repertoire spans three centuries of seafaring melody and verse, featuring an exceptional sampling of Cape and Islands sea songs and poetry.

 

Inspired by Nature: A Collaborative Program for Young Adults age 9-12

HOW DO HABITATS IMPACT OUR EXISTENCE?

The Cape’s habitats impact science, technology, art, music, history–every part of our daily existence. This summer, your child will explore the many habitats found right here in Falmouth and how they have influenced those who inhabit them.

We invite your child to engage their curiosity as the Cape Cod Conservatory, the Falmouth Art Center, the Falmouth Museums on the Green, Salt Pond Areas Bird Sanctuaries and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration partner with the Falmouth Public Schools to explore the Cape’s habitats.

Guided by teachers and local experts, your child will embark on a five-day hands-on adventure to understand the role and importance of HABITATS on our world and culture.

Inspired by Nature flyer 2016

Inspired by Nature for Website 2

 

 

Inspired by Nature for Website

Join us Monday, June 27th through Friday, July 1st, 9 am to 1 pm.

Register Early: Enrollment is limited to 25 students.  $ 175 per student.

For more information, call email [email protected] or call 508-540-0611

This program made possible by a grant from the Edward Bangs Kelley and Elza Kelley Foundation, Inc., and the  Gordon T. Heald Fund.

 

Tuesday, June 28, 7pm: Julie Fenster, “Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers who Transformed a Nation”

Jefferson's AmericaAt the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation.

Responsible for orchestrating the American push into the continent was President Thomas Jefferson. He most famously recruited Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, who led the Corps of Discovery to the Pacific, but at the same time there were other teams who did the same work, in places where it was even more crucial. William Dunbar, George Hunter, Thomas Freeman, Peter Custis, and the dauntless Zebulon Pike—all were dispatched on urgent missions to map the frontier and keep up a steady correspondence with Washington about their findings.
But they weren’t always well-matched—with each other and certainly not with a Spanish army of a thousand soldiers or more. These tensions threatened to undermine Jefferson’s goals for the nascent country, leaving the United States in danger of losing its foothold in the West. Deeply researched and inspiringly told, Jefferson’s America rediscovers the robust and often harrowing action from these seminal expeditions and illuminates the president’s vision for a continental America.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Thursday, June 23, 7 pm: David Dowling, “Surviving the Essex: The Afterlife of America’s Most Storied Shipwreck”

Surviving the EssexThe Essexthe famous shipwreck that inspired Moby Dick—and its aftermath is a captivating story of a ship’s crew battered by whale attack, broken by four months at sea, and forced—out of necessity—to make meals of their fellow survivors. Dowling delves into the ordeal’s submerged history—the survivors’ lives, ambitions and motives, their pivotal actions during the desperate moments of the wreck itself, and their will to reconcile those actions and their consequences.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Thursday, June 16, 7 pm: Jim Haskell: Appalachian Trail Adventures lecture

Thursday, June 16, 7 pm: Appalachian Trail Adventures

Map_of_Appalachian_TrailThere are two ways to hike the 2,190-mile Appalachian Trail – thru-hiking it all at once or section hiking it one part at a time. Museums on the Green will feature four men who have done it both ways during a unique Appalachian Trail program at the Cultural Center. Three young college men and friends from Mashpee – Michael Demanche, Brett Depolo and Sam Kooharian – will share their experiences of thru-hiking the trail together from Georgia to Maine in 2015. Jim Haskell of Ipswich, MA, will recount his stories of section hiking the entire trail, trekking roughly 100 miles a year, during 21 consecutive years. His book about his experiences, Two Tents: Twenty-one Years of Discovery on the Appalachian Trail, will be available. The men’s recollections of the people and places they encountered, their photographs of the stunning vistas they viewed, as well as a generous offering of the trail’s nearly 100-year history, promises to provide an informative and entertaining evening.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Wednesday, June 15, 7 pm: Howard Blum, “The Last Goodnight: A World War II Story of Espionage, Adventure and Betrayal”

The Last GoodnightBetty Pack was a dazzling American debutante became an Allied spy during WWII and was hailed by OSS chief General “Wild Bill” Donovan as “the greatest unsung heroine of the war.” She was charming, beautiful and intelligent—and she knew it. As an agent for Britain’s MI-6 and then America’s OSS during World War II, these qualities proved crucial to her success. This is the remarkable story of this “Mata Hari from Minnesota” and the passions that ruled her tempestuous life—a life filled with dangerous liaisons and death-defying missions vital to the Allied victory.

For decades, much of Betty’s career working for MI-6 and the OSS remained classified. Through access to recently unclassified files, Howard Blum discovers the truth about the attractive blond, codenamed “Cynthia,” who seduced diplomats and military attachés across the globe in exchange for ciphers and secrets; cracked embassy safes to steal codes; and obtained the Polish notebooks that proved key to Alan Turing’s success with Operation Ultra.Beneath Betty’s cool, professional determination, Blum reveals a troubled woman conflicted by the very traits that made her successful: her lack of deep emotional connections and her readiness to risk everything. The Last Goodnight is a mesmerizing, provocative, and moving portrait of an exceptional heroine whose undaunted courage helped to save the world.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Saturday, June 11, 2 pm: Misha Teramura, “The Professional Life of William Shakespeare”

Shakespeare2016 is the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Harvard educated Misha Teramura looks at what it was like to be a playwright in Renaissance London; some of the actors for whom Shakespeare wrote; his friends and rivals, his patrons and publishers; and other aspects of “The Bard’s” life.

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

Friday, June 10, 4 pm: Nathaniel Philbrick, “Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold and the fate of the American Revolution”

PLEASE NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 68 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Philbrick Valiant AmbitionIn September 1776, the vulnerable Continental Army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the British Army. Three weeks later, near the Canadian border, one of his favorite generals, Benedict Arnold, miraculously succeeds in postponing the British naval advance down Lake Champlain that might have ended the war. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons and Arnold has fled to the enemy after a foiled attempt to surrender the American fortress at West Point to the British. After four years of war, America is forced to realize that the real threat to its liberties might not come from without but from within.
Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation. The focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of Washington and Arnold, who is an impulsive but sympathetic hero whose misfortunes at the hands of self-serving politicians fatally destroy his faith in the legitimacy of the rebellion. As a country wary of tyrants suddenly must figure out how it should be led, Washington’s unmatched ability to rise above the petty politics of his time enables him to win the war that really matters.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Wednesday, June 8, 7pm: Michael McNaught, “Battle of Verdun 1916”

VerdunIn 1916, at the height of World War One, came Verdun–considered by many to be the greatest and lengthiest in world history. Never before or since has there been a battle of such duration, involving so many men on such a small plot of land. The conflict, which lasted from 21 February 1916 to 19 December 1916, led to casualties estimated at over 700,000 killed, wounded or missing. The battlefield itself was not even 10 square kilometers in size. From a strategic point of view, there could be no justification for these atrocious losses. The battle degenerated into a matter of prestige and principle for two nations, Germany and France, who continued fighting simply for the sake of fighting.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

June 6: Around the Sound Lighthouse Cruise

Monday, June 6, 2016: “Around the Sound Cruise” with the Island Queen,

5:30-7:30 pm

 IslandQueen_Leaving_Falmouth_Harbor

A Cruise Around Vineyard Sound as we explore the Sound on the way to the Vineyard, while celebrating the season

(Actual route will be determined that evening)

 Complimentary Appetizers and Light Fare (provided by Atria Woodbriar of Falmouth)     

Cash Bar (beer, wine, soft drinks, tea, coffee)

A unique opportunity to see and learn about some of the special sights of Cape Cod.  

Do Not Miss the Boat!

The dock for the Island Queen is at 75 Falmouth Heights Road, Falmouth, MA.

Be there by 5 PM to check-in and board.  Island Queen leaves at 5:30 sharp and returns at 7:30 PM. Exact route is dependent on weather and tides.  Please carpool. Free dockside parking is limited.

Casual Dress. Recommended to bring a windbreaker and/or sweater and to wear rubber-soled shoes.

To purchase tickets for this special cruise:


Around the Sound Cruise June 6, 2016





Cancellations:

If the Island Queen cannot sail, such as in the case of severe weather, the cruise will be postponed until the fall of 2016. If the Island Queen is unable to sail on the designated fall rain date, the cruise will be cancelled. You can then choose to convert your payment to a 100% donation or have your payment refunded. We will post notices of a postponement or cancellation on our website, www.museumsonthegreen.org. We will endeavor to arrange to have such notices also posted on the Island Queen website: www.islandqueen.com




 

 

Thursday, June 2, 7 pm: Jomarie Alano: “Partisan Diary: A Woman’s Life in the Italian Resistance”

Partisan DiaryAda Gobetti’s Partisan Diary is both diary and memoir. From a political and military point of view, the Partisan Diary provides firsthand knowledge of how the partisans in Piedmont fought, what obstacles they encountered, and who joined the struggle against the Nazis and the Fascists. The mountainous terrain and long winters of the Alpine regions (the site of many of their battles) and the ever-present threat of reprisals by German occupiers and their fascist partners exacerbated problems of organization among the various partisan groups. So arduous was their fight,that key military events–Italy’s declaration of war on Germany, the fall of Rome, and the Allied landings on D-Day –appear in the diary as remote and almost unrelated incidents. Ada Gobetti writes of the heartbreak of mothers who lost their sons or watched them leave on dangerous missions of sabotage, relating it to worries about her own son Paolo.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Tuesday, May 31, 7 pm: Candy Leonard, “Beatleness: How the Beatles and their Fans Remade the World”

BeatlenessThe Beatles arrived in the United States on February 7, 1964, and immediately became a constant, compelling presence in fans’ lives. For the next six years, the band presented a nonstop deluge of sounds, words, images, and ideas, transforming the childhood and adolescence of millions of baby boomers.
Beatleness explains how the band became a source of emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual nurturance in fans’ lives, creating a relationship that was historically unique. Looking at that relationship against the backdrop of the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, political assassinations, and other events of those tumultuous years, the book examines critically the often-heard assertion that the Beatles “changed everything” and shows how—through the interplay between the group, the fans, and the culture—that change came about.
A generational memoir and cultural history based on hundreds of hours of in-depth interviews with first-generation fans, Beatleness allows readers to experience—or re-experience—what it was like to be a young person during those eventful and transformative years. Its fresh approach offers many new insights into the entire Beatle phenomenon and explains why the group still means so much to so many.

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

Tuesday, May 24, 7 pm: Christopher Oldstone Moore: “Of Beards and Men: The Revealing History of Facial Hair”

Of Beards and ManBeards—they’re all the rage these days. Take a look around: from hip urbanites to rustic outdoorsmen, well-groomed metrosexuals to post-season hockey players, facial hair is everywhere. The New York Times traces this hairy trend to Big Apple hipsters circa 2005 and reports that today some New Yorkers pay thousands of dollars for facial hair transplants to disguise patchy, juvenile beards. And in 2014, blogger Nicki Daniels excoriated bearded hipsters for turning a symbol of manliness and power into a flimsy fashion statement. The beard, she said, has turned into the padded bra of masculinity. Of Beards and Men makes the case that today’s bearded renaissance is part of a centuries-long cycle in which facial hairstyles have varied in response to changing ideals of masculinity. Christopher Oldstone-Moore explains that the clean-shaven face has been the default style throughout Western history—see Alexander the Great’s beardless face, for example, as the Greek heroic ideal. But the primacy of razors has been challenged over the years by four great bearded movements, beginning with Hadrian in the second century and stretching to today’s bristled resurgence. The clean-shaven face today, Oldstone-Moore says, has come to signify a virtuous and sociable man, whereas the beard marks someone as self-reliant and unconventional. History, then, has established specific meanings for facial hair, which both inspire and constrain a man’s choices in how he presents himself to the world. This fascinating and erudite history of facial hair cracks the masculine hair code, shedding light on the choices men make as they shape the hair on their faces. Oldstone-Moore adeptly lays to rest common misperceptions about beards and vividly illustrates the connection between grooming, identity, culture, and masculinity. To a surprising degree, we find, the history of men is written on their faces.

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

May 22nd: Falmouth Walk for History

Walk for History—Sunday, May 22, 2016, 8:00-11:00 am

FALMOUTH HISTORY WALK IS ON FOR MAY 22!

The Museums on the Green invites you to the first  “Falmouth History Walk” on Sunday, May 22nd.  Along the 5k (3.1 miles) walk you will meet costumed characters from Falmouth’s history. You can come in costume, too, or just come as you are.  Prizes will be awarded for best costumes, but chiefly the walk is intended for all, especially families, to participate and appreciate our local history.  Beginning and ending at the Museums on the Green, the path will travel past a number of historic homes and sites in Falmouth. Along the way, at various venues, there will be costumed re-enactors and signs  to signifythat the particular location is of historical importance. You are going to meet pirates, complete with their ship, along the route.

Walkers can go at their own pace. Self-timed runners are also welcome.  Refreshments and a takeaway item will be presented at the finish line.  All funds benefit the Museums on the Green, home of the Falmouth Historical Society.

Registration begins at 8:00 a.m..  The walk begins at 9 a.m.  Participants are asked to park at the Lawrence School, 113 Lakeview, Falmouth, and walk across the field to the registration area at the Museums on the Green.  There is no on-street parking available, and no parking in the Congregational Church parking lot.

FalmouthHistoricalWalk2916The walk route:

  • Katharine Lee Bates Road to Shore Road extension
  • Cross Main Street to Shore Street
  • Shore Street to Surf Drive
  • Surf Drive to Mill Road
  • Mill Road to Locust Street
  • Locust Street to West Main Street
  • West Main Street to Hewins Street to Museums on the Green

 

 

Advance registration fee is $ 15 per entrant; $ 30 for immediate families of three or more. Registration fee at the event is $20 per entrant or $40 for immediate families of three or more. To register, fill out the information below, or print registration form and mail with check to Museums on the Green, PO Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541.

History Walk Registration Form

 

Please click HERE to read FALMOUTH WALK FOR HISTORY 2016 RELEASE FORM

*Name:

Address:

Phone:

*Email:

Other Family Members in group:

Read and acknowledge this General Release Form

I represent that I am in good health and in proper physical condition and state of mind to participate in the Walk and accept sole responsibility for my own well-being, conduct, and actions while participating in the Walk and the well-being, conduct and actions of any minors that accompany me during the Walk. I agree to abide by the decision of any Walk official or public safety officer relative to my ability to safely complete the Walk, further acknowledging that I assume all risk associated with the Walk and am solely responsible for knowing whether I should withdraw from the Walk at any time due to weather, health or wellness considerations.

Having read this waiver and knowing these facts, I hereby expressly assume all risks of participating in the Walk and any pre- or post-Walk activities for both myself and for any minors that may accompany me. Further, for myself and for my spouse, children, guardians, heirs and next of kin, and any legal and personal representatives, I hereby waive and release and agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Museums on the Green, Inc., the Town of Falmouth, Massachusetts, and all of their sponsors, directors, officers, employees, agents, representatives and successors (collectively and individually, as the context may require, the “Released Parties”) from and against any and all claims, causes of action, damages, or liabilities of any kind or nature whatsoever arising out of my participation in the Walk and any pre- and post-Walk activities, even though such claim, cause of action or liability may arise in whole or in part out of negligence or carelessness on the part of the Released Parties.

I grant to Museums on the Green and its sponsors and licensees the exclusive right to the free use of my image, name, my voice, and/or my picture or recording in any broadcast, telecast, advertising, promotion or other account of the Walk. I acknowledge that my entry fee is non-refundable, including if the race is cancelled. I agree I will not chargeback or dispute the relevant credit card transaction. Issuance of a Walk number is a license, only, revocable in the discretion of the Walk in the event of my violation of any law or any Walk policy, including disruption of the Walk, or my failure to follow directions given by public safety officials or Walk officials.
By proceeding with this event registration, I agree that the terms of this Registration Agreement shall apply equally to me and to any third parties for whom you are acting as agent. I represent and warrant that if I am registering a child under eighteen (18) years of age I am the parent or legal guardian of such child. Further, in consideration of the entry of any child under the age of eighteen (18), I, as the parent or legal guardian of the entrant, agree to all the conditions hereof on behalf of the entrant, intending them to be bound fully by the terms hereof, and agreeing to the above on my own behalf, according to the terms stated herein.

ADVANCE ENTRY FEE:
 $15 per registrant $30 families of two or more

Please enclose check payable to Museums on the Green
Mail to: P. O. Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541

Date:

Signature


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Fill in the information below to register online with Paypal.

 


Number of Entrants




Participants are encouraged–but it is certainly not necessary–to wear costumes as they do their walk, of any period in Falmouth history (from 1686 to the 1960’s). Prizes for the best costumes will be awarded.  Need ideas as to what people wore during a certain era?  Click on below for links to historical dress from various periods:Colonial ClothingRevolutionary War EraVictorian Era

Civil War Era

Roaring Twenties

World War 2 Era

1950’s Clothing

1960’s Clothing

Thursday, May 19, 7pm: Reid Mitenbuler, “Bourbon Empire: The Past and Future of America’s Whiskey”

Bourbon EmpireWhiskey has profoundly influenced America’s political, economic, and cultural destiny, just as those same factors have inspired the evolution and unique flavor of the whiskey itself. Unraveling the many myths and misconceptions surrounding America’s most iconic spirit, Bourbon Empire traces a history that spans frontier rebellion, Gilded Age corruption, and the magic of Madison Avenue. Taking readers behind the curtain of an enchanting—and sometimes exasperating—industry, the work of writer Reid Mitenbuler crackles with attitude and commentary about taste, choice, and history. Few products better embody the United States, or American business, than bourbon.

 

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

Friday, May 6, 7 pm: Joseph Williams, “Seventeen Fathoms Deep: The Saga of the Submarine S-4 Disaster”

After being accidentally rammed by the Coast Guard destroyer USS Paulding on December 17, 1927, the USS S-4 submarine sank to the ocean floor off Cape Cod with all forty crew aboard. Only six sailors in the forward torpedo room survived the initial accident, trapped in the compartment with the oxygen running out.
Author and naval historian Joseph A. Williams has delved into never-revealed archival sources to tell the compelling narrative of the S-4 disaster, the first attempt to rescue survivors stranded aboard a modern submarine. As navy deep sea divers struggled to save the imprisoned men, a winter storm raged at the surface, creating some of the worst diving conditions in American history. Circumstances were so terrible that one diver, Fred Michels, became trapped in the wreckage while trying to attach an air hose to the sunken sub—the rescuer now needed to be rescued. It was only through the bravery of a second diver, Thomas Eadie, that Michels was saved. As detailed in Seventeen Fathoms Deep, lessons learned during this great tragedy moved the US Navy to improve submarine rescue technology, which resulted in later successful rescues of other downed submariners.

Wednesday, April 27, 7 pm: Joseph Bagley, “A History of Boston in 50 Artifacts”

History is right under our feet; we just need to dig a little to find it. Though not the most popular construction project, Boston’s Big Dig has contributed more to our understanding and appreciation of the city’s archaeological history than any other recent event. Joseph M. Bagley, city archaeologist of Boston, uncovers a fascinating hodgepodge of history—from ancient fishing grounds to Jazz Age red-light districts—that will surprise and delight even longtime residents. Each artifact is shown in full color and accompanied by description of the item’s significance to its site location and the larger history of the city. From cannonballs to drinking cups and from ancient spears to chinaware, A History of Boston in 50 Artifacts offers a unique and accessible introduction to Boston’s history and physical culture while revealing the ways objects can offer a tantalizing entrée into our past.

Saturday, April 23, 2 pm: William Geroux, “The Mathews Men: Seven Brothers and the War Against Hitler’s U-Boats”

Mathews County, Virginia, is a remote outpost on the Chesapeake Bay with little to offer except unspoiled scenery—but it sent one of the largest concentrations of sea captains and U.S. merchant mariners of any community in America to fight in World War II. The Mathews Men tells that heroic story through the experiences of one extraordinary family whose seven sons (and their neighbors), U.S. merchant mariners all, suddenly found themselves squarely in the cross-hairs of the U-boats bearing down on the coastal United States in 1942. From the late 1930s to 1945, virtually all the fuel, food and munitions that sustained the Allies in Europe traveled not via the Navy but in merchant ships. After Pearl Harbor, those unprotected ships instantly became the U-boats’ prime targets. And they were easy targets—the Navy lacked the inclination or resources to defend them until the beginning of 1943. Hitler was determined that his U-boats should sink every American ship they could find, sometimes within sight of tourist beaches, and to kill as many mariners as possible, in order to frighten their shipmates into staying ashore. As the war progressed, men from Mathews sailed the North and South Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean, and even the icy Barents Sea in the Arctic Circle, where they braved the dreaded Murmansk Run. Through their experiences we have eyewitnesses to every danger zone, in every kind of ship. Some died horrific deaths. Others fought to survive torpedo explosions, flaming oil slicks, storms, shark attacks, mine blasts, and harrowing lifeboat odysseys—only to ship out again on the next boat as soon as they’d returned to safety.

Thursday, April 21, 7 pm: Christopher Daley, “Murder and Mayhem in Boston: Historic Crimes in the Hub”

Boston’s history is checkered with violence and heinous crimes. In 1845, a woman lured into prostitution was murdered at the hands of her jealous lover who used sleepwalking as his defense at trial. A leg was found floating along the Boston Harbor, wrapped in a burlap bag that would later be connected to a woman who was brutally murdered and dismembered by her handyman. In the 1970s, a string of seemingly unconnected murders led to a killer who became known as the Giggler. Christopher Daley explores the tragic events that turned peaceful Boston neighborhoods into disturbing crime scenes.

Tuesday, April 12, 7 pm: Lou Ureneck, “The Great Fire: One American’s Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century’s First Genocide

The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay.

With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people.

Heritage Award Sponsors

The 2016 Heritage Award Dinner, held on April 13, 2016, is made possible in part to the efforts of our most gracious sponsors:

PRESENTING SPONSOR: CAPE COD FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANKCC5_Oval_302_FDIC_Tag

 

 

 

 

 

ADMIRAL LEVEL SPONSOR: M. DUFFANY BUILDERSDuffany logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAPTAIN LEVEL SPONSOR: WOOD LUMBER COMPANYWood Lumber Company logo

 

 

 

 

LIEUTENANT LEVEL SPONSOR: ISLAND QUEEN FERRYIsland Queen

 

 

 

 

 

ENSIGN LEVEL SPONSOR: BOSTON MARINE SOCIETYBoston Marine Society

 

Saturday, March 19, 2 pm: Colin Woodard, “American Character: The Epic Struggle between Individual Liberty and the Common Good”

The struggle between individual rights and the good of the community as a whole has been the basis of nearly every major disagreement in our history, from the debates at the Constitutional Convention and in the run up to the Civil War to the fights surrounding the agendas of the Federalists, the Progressives, the New Dealers, the civil rights movement, and the Tea Party. In American Character, Colin Woodard traces these two key strands in American politics through the four centuries of the nation’s existence, from the first colonies through the Gilded Age, Great Depression and the present day, and he explores how different regions of the country have successfully or disastrously accommodated them. The independent streak found its most pernicious form in the antebellum South but was balanced in the Gilded Age by communitarian reform efforts; the New Deal was an example of a successful coalition between communitarian-minded Eastern elites and Southerners.

Woodard argues that maintaining a liberal democracy, a society where mass human freedom is possible, requires finding a balance between protecting  individual liberty and nurturing a free society. Going to either libertarian or collectivist extremes results in tyranny. But where does the “sweet spot” lie in the United States, a federation of disparate regional cultures that have always strongly disagreed on these issues?

Saturday, March 12, 1 pm: Girl Scout Birthday Celebration: Short film screening and presentation by Alecia Orsini

Join us as we celebrate the 104th birthday of the Girl Scouts with a short film presentation and talk by Alecia Orsini. Alecia will narrate the 1918 silent film “The Golden Eaglet,” which explores the history of the organization. She will also discuss the exciting renaissance that’s happening in girl scouting in Falmouth.

Alecia Orsini has been girl scouting for 27 years. A lifetime member of GSUSA, she started as a Daisy, became a leader, and ran scouting for her home town. She also spent seven years as an educator and guide at the Juliette Low Birthplace in Savannah. Alecia will share insights into “the original J Low,” the spirited woman whose belief in the potential of every young girl ultimately changed the world when she founded the Girl Scouts in 1912.

This family-friendly event will be held in the Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, and refreshments will be provided. Admission is free but donations to the Falmouth Girl Scout program will be accepted and cookies will be available for purchase!1924 Girl Scout troop on library steps

Thursday, March 10, 7 pm: Bob Halloran, “White Devil: The True Story of the First White Asian Crime Boss”

In August 2013, “Bac Guai” John Willis, also known as the “White Devil” because of his notorious ferocity, was sentenced to 20 years for drug trafficking and money laundering. Willis, according to prosecutors, was “the kingpin, organizer and leader of a vast conspiracy,” all within the legendarily insular and vicious Chinese mafia.
It started when John Willis was 16 years old . . . his life seemed hopeless. His father had abandoned his family years earlier, his older brother had just died of a heart attack, and his mother was dying. John was alone, sleeping on the floor of his deceased brother’s home. Desperate, John reached out to Woping, a young Chinese man Willis had rescued from a bar fight weeks before. Woping literally picks him up off the street, taking him home to live among his own brothers and sisters. Soon, Willis is accompanying Woping to meet his Chinese mobster friends, and starts working for them.

Journalist Bob Halloran tells the tale of John Willis, aka White Devil, the only white man to ever rise through the ranks in the Chinese mafia. Willis began as an enforcer, riding around with other gang members to “encourage” people to pay their debts. He soon graduated to even more dangerous work as a full-fledged gang member, barely escaping with his life on several occasions. Told to Halloran from Willis’s prison cell, White Devil is a shocking portrait of a man who was allowed access into a secret world, and who is paying the price for his hardened life. As a white man navigating an otherwise exclusively Asian world, Willis was at first an interesting anomaly, but his ruthless devotion to his adopted culture eventually led to him emerging as a leader. He organized his own gang of co-conspirators and began an extremely lucrative criminal venture selling tens of thousands of oxycodone pills. A year-long FBI investigation brought him down, and John pleaded guilty to save the love of his life from prosecution. He has no regrets. White Devil explores the workings of the Chinese mafia, and he speaks frankly about his relationships with other gang members, the crimes he committed, and why he’ll never rat out any of his brothers to the cops.

Wednesday, February 17, 7 pm: William Doyle, “PT 109: An American Epic of War, Survival and the Destiny of John F. Kennedy”

In the early morning darkness of August 2, 1943, during a chaotic nighttime skirmish amid the Solomon Islands, the Japanese destroyer Amagiri barreled through thick fog and struck the U.S. Navy’s motor torpedo boat PT 109, splitting the craft nearly in half and killing two American sailors instantly. The sea erupted in flames as the 109’s skipper, John F. Kennedy, and the ten surviving crewmen under his command desperately clung to the sinking wreckage; 1,200 feet of ink-black, shark-infested water loomed beneath. “All hands lost,” came the reports back to the Americans’ base: no rescue was coming for the men of PT 109. Their desperate ordeal was just beginning—so too was one of the most remarkable tales of World War II, one whose astonishing afterlife would culminate two decades later in the White House.

Drawing on original interviews with the last living links to the events, previously untapped Japanese wartime archives, and a wealth of archival documents from the Kennedy Library, including a lost first-hand account by JFK himself, bestselling author William Doyle has crafted a thrilling and definitive account of the sinking of PT 109 and its shipwrecked crew’s heroics. Equally fascinating is the story’s second act, in which Doyle explores in new detail how this extraordinary episode shaped Kennedy’s character and fate, proving instrumental to achieving his presidential ambitions: “Without PT 109, there never would have been a President John F. Kennedy,” declared JFK aide David Powers.

Annual Meeting: Saturday, January 16, 10 am

The Falmouth Historical Society and the Museums on the Green will be holding their Annual Members Meeting on Saturday, January 16th, beginning at 10:0 am, in the Museum’s Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth. Members of the Historical Society will be discussing the business of the Society, voting on the 2016 slate of Governors, and will get a preview of what is forthcoming for the 2016 visitation season while also learning about the restoration efforts for the circa 1730 Conant House.

Christmas Traditions Holiday House Tour

Wicks House Christmas PhotoThe Museums on the Green will honor the traditions of Christmas with special events, including house tours of the 1790 Dr. Francis Wicks House.  Decorated by members of the Falmouth Garden Club, the Wicks House will be open Saturday and Sunday, December 5 and 6, from 10 to 3 pm, and from Thursday December 10 through Sunday December 13, 10 to 3 pm. Admission is $ 5.

Christmas 2013 015A special free admission Family Fun Night will be held on Saturday, December 5 from 4 to 7 pm.  Come and make gingerbread houses, decorate ornaments, and enjoy a visit with Santa!  This will be in our Cultural Center and families can enjoy the Museums prior to the Falmouth Town Tree lighting at 7 pm.Christmas 2013 061

On Saturday, December 12 from 12 until 2, there will be a special musical concert in our Cultural Center, provided by students and members of the Cape Cod Conservatory.  Admission is free!

Nov. 19: John Galluzzo and Matthew Lawrence, “Shipwrecks of Stellwagen Bank”

Beneath the churning surface of Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary rest the bones of shipwrecks and sailors alike. Massachusetts ports connected its citizens to the world, and the number of merchant and fishing vessels grew alongside the nations development. Hundreds of ships sank on the trade routes and fishing grounds between Cape Cod and Cape Ann. Their stories are waiting to be uncoveredfrom the ill-fated steamship Portland to collided schooners Frank A. Palmer and Louise B. Crary and the burned dragger Joffre. Join historian John Galluzzo and maritime archaeologists Matthew Lawrence and Deborah Marx as they dive in to investigate the sunken vessels and captivating history of New Englands only national marine sanctuary.

Nov. 11, 7 pm: David Stewart, “The Wilson Deception”

After four years of horror The Great War has ended, and President Woodrow Wilson’s arrival in Paris in December 1918 unites the city in ecstatic celebration. Major Jamie Fraser, an army physician who has spent ten months tending American soldiers, is among the crowd that throngs the Place de la Concorde for Wilson’s visit. As an expert on the Spanish influenza, Fraser is also called in to advise the president’s own doctor on how best to avoid the deadly disease. Despite his robust appearance, Wilson is more frail than the public realizes. And at this pivotal moment in history, with the Allied victors gathering to forge a peace treaty, the president’s health could decide the fate of nations.
While Fraser tries to determine the truth about Wilson’s maladies, he encounters a man he has not seen for twenty years. Speed Cook—ex-professional ball player and advocate for Negro rights—is desperate to save his son Joshua, an army sergeant wrongly accused of desertion. Pledging to help Cook, Fraser approaches Allen Dulles, a charming American spy who is also Wilson’s close aide. Soon Cook and Fraser’s personal quest will dovetail with the dramatic events unfolding throughout Paris, as French premier Georges Clemenceau narrowly survives an assassination attempt and peace negotiations begin to unravel. Rivalries and hidden agendas abound. At stake is not only Joshua Cook’s freedom, but the fragile treaty that may be the only way to stop Europe from plunging into another brutal war.
With a cast of vividly drawn characters that includes T.E. Lawrence, David Lloyd George, and Winston Churchill, David O. Stewart’s fast-paced novel is a riveting and expertly researched blend of history and suspense—illuminating, deftly plotted, and thoroughly satisfying.

Tuesday, October 27, 7pm: Alix Christie, “Gutenberg’s Apprentice”

Tuesday, October 27, 7 pm: Alix Christie, author of “Gutenberg’s Apprentice”

Novelist Alix Christie brings to life one of the most momentous events in history: the birth of printing in medieval Germany—a story of invention, intrigue, and betrayal, told through the lives of the three men who made it possible.

Youthful, ambitious Peter Schoeffer is on the verge of professional success as a scribe in Paris when his foster father, wealthy merchant and bookseller Johann Fust, summons him to meet “a most amazing man”–Johann Gutenberg, a driven and caustic inventor, who has devised a revolutionary—and to some, blasphemous—method of bookmaking: a machine he calls a printing press. As they produce copies of the Holy Bible, mechanical difficulties and the crushing power of the Catholic Church threaten their work. As outside forces align against them, these men must work together to prevail against overwhelming obstacles—a battle that will change history . . . and irrevocably transform them.

October 21, 7pm: M.T. Anderson: “Symphony for the City of the Dead”

  • Wednesday, October 21, 7pm: M.T. Anderson, “Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmiti Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad”

In September 1941, Adolf Hitler’s Wehrmacht surrounded Leningrad in what was to become one of the longest and most destructive sieges in Western history—almost three years of bombardment and starvation that culminated in the harsh winter of 1943–1944. More than a million citizens perished. Survivors recall corpses littering the frozen streets, their relatives having neither the means nor the strength to bury them. Residents burned books, furniture, and floorboards to keep warm; they ate family pets and—eventually—one another to stay alive. Trapped between the Nazi invading force and the Soviet government itself was composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who would write a symphony that roused, rallied, eulogized, and commemorated his fellow citizens—the Leningrad Symphony, which came to occupy a surprising place of prominence in the eventual Allied victory.This is the true story of a city under siege: the triumph of bravery and defiance in the face of terrifying odds. It is also a look at the power—and layered meaning—of music in beleaguered lives.

Saturday, October 17: An American Music Sampler

Saturday, October 17th, 7 pm: An American Music Sampler

(To be held at Cape Cod Conservatory, 60 Highfield Drive, Falmouth)

The Spectrum Singers, a 12-piece chamber ensemble, will provide a one-hour program with a selection of America’s best choral music framed with commentary to provide historical context. Songs from American composers such as Scott Joplin, George Gershwin, Stephen Foster, Cole Porter, Leonard Bernstein and Aaron Copland, among others, will be performed. Spectrum Singers

Tickets are $ 15 each.  Families of four (2 children 12 and younger) are $ 40 each.

Seating is limited, so reservations are requested


American Music Sampler Tickets



 

October 7, 7 pm: Alex Kershaw, “Avenue of Spies”

  • Wednesday, October 7, 7 pm: Alex Kershaw, author of “Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage and One Family’s Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris”

The leafy Avenue de Foch, one of the most exclusive residential streets in Nazi-occupied France, was Paris’s hotbed of daring spies, murderous secret police, amoral informers, and Vichy collaborators. So when American physician Sumner Jackson, who lived with his wife and young son Phillip at Number 11, found himself drawn into the Liberation network of the French resistance, he knew the stakes were impossibly high. Just down the road at Number 31 was the “mad sadist” Theodor Dannecker, an Eichmann protégé charged with deporting French Jews to concentration camps. And Number 84 housed the Parisian headquarters of the Gestapo, run by the most effective spy hunter in Nazi Germany.
From his office at the American Hospital, itself an epicenter of Allied and Axis intrigue, Jackson smuggled fallen Allied fighter pilots safely out of France, a job complicated by the hospital director’s close ties to collaborationist Vichy. After witnessing the brutal round-up of his Jewish friends, Jackson invited Liberation to officially operate out of his home at Number 11–but the noose soon began to tighten. When his secret life was discovered by his Nazi neighbors, he and his family were forced to undertake  a journey into the dark heart of the war-torn continent from which there was little chance of return.
Drawing upon a wealth of primary source material and extensive interviews with Phillip Jackson, Alex Kershaw recreates the City of Light during its darkest days. The untold story of the Jackson family anchors the suspenseful narrative, and Kershaw dazzles readers with the vivid immediacy of the best spy thrillers. Awash with the tense atmosphere of World War II’s Europe, Avenue of Spies introduces us to the brave doctor who risked everything to defy Hitler.

October 2: Falmouth Jazz Stroll: FREE!

Downtown Falmouth comes alive on Friday night. The shops and restaurants from Queen’s Buyway along Main Street will showcase an assortment of groups ranging from classic swing to avant-garde with a little blues thrown in. Just wander in and out.  It’s all free.

The 2015 line up features both local favorites and award winning ensembles.  Each performance time is staggered so the audience has an opportunity to hear a variety of jazz styles throughout the evening. The Museums on the Green will participate by hosting Bart Weisman discussing jazz at 5:15 pm and then CJazz will perform from 6:45 to 8:00 pm. For a full schedule of Jazz Stroll events, click here

October 1, 7pm: Gary Myers, “Brady versus Manning: The Untold Story of the Rivalry that Transformed the NFL”

Please note: This lecture will be held at the First Congregational Church, 68 Main Street, Falmouth, beginning at 7 pm

Tom Brady and Peyton Manning are perhaps the two greatest quarterbacks of all time. They are living legends who have come to embody the quarterback position and shape an entire generation of the NFL. They have also been fierce rivals every step of the way, and their many epic duels have not only ranked among the best and most exciting games ever played, they have fundamentally shaped the lives of and careers of both men.

But for all their shared brilliance, they are a study in contrasts. Tom is the underdog turned ultimate winner, an unheralded draft pick who went on to win a miraculous Super Bowl and become the leader of one of the NFL’s greatest dynasties. He is as firmly associated with big game brilliance as anyone who has ever played. Meanwhile Peyton was born into NFL royalty and a mountain of outsized expectations, yet somehow lived up to and exceeded all the hype, claiming virtually every passing record along his path to football immortality.

The contrast in greatness—between the overachieving underdog and the crown prince of football, between postseason brilliance and statistical dominance—has served as an endless source of fascination for fans and media, and over the years as the two players have faced off again and again in classic games, the argument has onlyintensified.

But until now, there has never been a definitive treatment of the debate that tells the real story.
What do Tom and Peyton actually think of each other? What do their coaches think of them? What about teammates and opposing players? What are they like behind closed doors and in the locker room, and how does that influence their careers? How did their vastly different upbringings shape them, and how has each handled the injuries, setbacks and defeats they’ve dealt with over their careers? Veteran NFL correspondent Gary Myers tackles this subject from every angle and with unprecedented access and insight, drawing on a huge number of never-before-heard interviews with Brady and Manning, their coaches, their families, and those who have played with them and against them. The result is a remarkable collection of the most entertaining and revealing stories ever told about Peyton and Tom, from how they developed their vastly different leadership styles, to the unlikely friendship they’ve built over the years, to their respective exploits as locker room pranksters.

Sept. 30: Elizabeth Abbott lecture: “A History of Marriage”

  • Wednesday, September 30, 7 pm: Elizabeth Abbott, “A History of Marriage”

A History of Marriage explores how marriage developed, and examines real-life experiences in their wider historical context: How did a wealthy couple’s experience differ from a poor one’s? How did children both fit into and define the shape of marriage? What were a couple’s alternatives to staying together, and how long was the average marriage until death ended it? Abbott provides an intriguing look at the way we were, and poses important questions relevant to a 21st-century understanding of marriage.

September 9, 7 pm: Stewart Gordon, “The History of the World in Sixteen Shipwrecks”

  • Wednesday, September 9, 7 pm: Stewart Gordon, author of “The History of the World in Sixteen Shipwrecks”

 

Roman triremes of the Mediterranean. The treasure fleet of the Spanish Main. Great ocean liners of the Atlantic. Stories of disasters at sea fire the imagination as little else can, whether the subject is a historical wreck—the Titanic or theBismark—or the recent capsizing of a Mediterranean cruise ship. Shipwrecks also make for a new and very different understanding of world history. A History of the World in Sixteen Shipwrecks explores the ages-long, immensely hazardous, persistently romantic, and still-ongoing process of moving people and goods across far-flung maritime worlds.

Telling the stories of ships and the people who made and sailed them, from the earliest ancient-Nile craft to the Exxon Valdez, A History of the World in Sixteen Shipwrecks argues that the gradual integration of localized and separate maritime regions into fewer, larger, and more interdependent regions offers a unique window on world history. Stewart Gordon draws a number of provocative conclusions from his study, among them that the European “Age of Exploration” as a singular event is simply a myth—many cultures, east and west, explored far-flung maritime worlds over the millennia—and that technologies of shipbuilding and navigation have been among the main drivers of science and technology throughout history. Finally, A History of the World in Sixteen Shipwrecks shows in a series of compelling narratives that the development of institutions and technologies that made terrifying oceans familiar, and turned unknown seas into sea-lanes, profoundly matters in our modern world

“The Kissing Sailor”: A Commemoration of V-J Day, September 2, 2015

On Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015—the 70th anniversary of “V-J Day” ending World War II with the Allied victory over Japan–the Falmouth Historical Society will host a dinnerV-J Day2 and program to honor those who served in the Armed Forces during that conflict. This event, held at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, begins at 6 pm that evening and will include a visit from George Mendonsa—better known as “The Kissing Sailor” immortalized in Times Square kissing a nurse when peace was finally declared. There will also be a talk by author Lawrence Verria, who identified just who “The Kissing Sailor” really was; music of the era; and a meal that would fit in with the period.

The event will include Senior Officers from the United States Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and Maritime. In addition to Mr. Verria, a speech will be made by General Gordon R. Sullivan, United States Army (Retired), President of the Association of the United States Army and former Chief of Staff. There will also be period music provided during the evening.V-J Day headline


The Kissing Sailor V-J Day Commemoration Dinner



For those unfamiliar: On August 14, 1945, photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt took a picture of a sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square, minutes after they heard of Japan’s surrender to the United States. Two weeks later LIFE magazine, the world’s dominant photo journal at the time, published that image. It became one of the most famous WWII photographs in history and the most celebrated photograph ever published in the magazine–a cherished reminder of what it felt like for the war to be over. Everyone who saw the picture wanted to know more about the nurse and sailor, but Eisenstaedt had no information and a search for the mysterious couple’s identity took on a dimension of its own.

For many years, no one really knew who “The Kissing Sailor” actually was. There were searches conducted over the years and several candidates were identified, but all of the possibilities turned out to be incorrect. It was not until 2012 Mr. Verria answered the question definitively. Come and learn the story of that quest and the photographic evidence that proves it.

V-J Day3  On September 2, 2015—the 70th anniversary of “V-J Day” (Victory over Japan), the Falmouth Historical Society will welcome Mr. Verria, Mr. Mendonsa and Mrs. Mendonsa (the former Rita Petry) at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth. We will be having a dinner that night, celebrating the exploits of “The Greatest Generation” and allowing people to We will turn the Coonamessett Inn into a 1940’s canteen and honor those who served during World War II.

Menu for the evening: 

   o Minestrone soup (served at the table) 
   o Chicken Pot Pie with crust
   o Beef Bourguignon
   o Mashed potatoes
   o Seasonal Vegetable 
   o Apple Crisp with whipped cream (served at the table)

Special note: any veteran of World War II who lives in Falmouth can attend for no charge that night. If they need someone to come with them, one escort is allowed to attend at a price of $ 40. All other attendees must pay full admission price. To make a reservation for a Falmouth WW2 veteran, please call 508-548-4857 or email [email protected]

This event made possible in part by the sponsorship of Cape Cod Five Bank, Wood Lumber Company, and the Falmouth Road Race.

To purchase a ticket to this dinner at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, click below:


The Kissing Sailor V-J Day Commemoration Dinner



Cannot make the dinner but still want to make a donation to honor those who served in World War 2?  You can do so below:




Want to run in the Falmouth Road Race August 16th? Here’s how!

Road Race 1Join our Road Race Team!

Were you or someone you know left out of this year’s Falmouth Road Race lottery? Well, you haven’t missed your chance! We still have a few spaces left on our Numbers for Nonprofits team.

By running on behalf of Falmouth Museums on the Green, home of the Falmouth Historical Society, you will not only enjoy participating in one of the world’s premier races, but also give back to the seaside town that makes it such a special event.

We pay the $150 registration fee and you commit to raising $750 by race day, August 16, through the online fundraising site, FirstGiving, at no cost to you. We will assist you with your goal through our website, social media, and e-newsletters. One hundred percent of proceeds will go to our mission of preserving and sharing the history of Falmouth and providing educational outreach to all the Falmouth Public Schools. The story of Falmouth begins here, but we can’t tell it without your help!

For more information, contact Sarah Murphy at 508-548-4857 ext. 21 or by email:[email protected]

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Falmouth Road Race Spotlight: Meet Jason Stumpf

 

We are grateful to Jason Stumpf for joining our Numbers for Nonprofits team in this year’s New Balance Falmouth Road Race. Jason has agreed to raise a minimum of $750, which will go directly to Museums on the Green operations, enabling us to further our mission of preserving and celebrating the history of Falmouth and educating all ages about our rich heritage.  Help him reach, and hopefully surpass, his goal by visiting his FirstGiving (http://www.firstgiving.com/fundraiser/JasonStumpf/FRR2015) page and making a donation today!

Jason is the head of the Humanities Department at the Walnut Hill School for the Arts in Natick. His ties to Falmouth run deep, as his wife, Margaret Funkhouser, grew up in West Falmouth. Margaret is also a member of the faculty at Walnut Hill, and they live on campus with their two boys, Jonas and Owen.

August 13, 7 pm: J. David Markham lecture: “Napoleon”: POSTPONED

Napoleon.  The name has conjured up images for two centuries. The English viewed him as the Antichrist and the French experienced glory they had never known before. 2015 is the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, and August 15 is the 246th anniversary of his birth. J. David Markham, President of the International Napoleonic Society, will discuss the life of the man who most historians agree was one of the most compelling and gifted military leaders of all time.  He was a political leader whose reign brought an end to the French Revolution and began a series of wars that changed the dynamics of European culture.  His life remains as compelling today as it was 200 years ago.

Friday, August 7: “Swinging on a Star”

Celebrate Summer at “Swinging on a Star!”Swinging on a Star

Join us on Friday, August 7 from 5:30 to 8 PM for “Swinging on a Star,” a cocktail party fundraiser to support Falmouth Museums on the Green. If you attended last year’s gala, you know this is a festive event not to be missed!

Solon Z and the Sapphires will once again wow with the Big Band sounds of the 1940s. Stroll about the campus while enjoying decadent offerings from Chef Roland’s Catering and pose for the pen of talented Boston and Cape Cod caricature artist Mark Penta. The event will also feature an exhibition of iconic 1940s fashion, a silent auction, and a raffle.

Some of our unique and exclusive auction items:

  • You and nine guests will enjoy a private wine tasting in your home donated by “The Wine Advisor”
  • Ellen Brodsky of Cape Cod Dance will instruct your group with a private salsa lesson in the Museums on the Green Cultural Center
  • Wine of the Month for a full year! Murphy’s Package Store will personally select a wine each month for you
  • Unleash the writer within! You and a group of friends will get in touch with your creative side with a writing workshop donated by Falmouth author T.M. Murphy

 

Tickets to the event are $65 per person, which includes one ticket to the cash bar. After that endless winter, we look forward to this stylish summer soirée!

We are grateful to our sponsors: Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank, Lawrence-Lynch Corporation, and Salt Pond Realty LLP. For sponsorship opportunities, contact Carolyn Tarr: 508-548-4857 ext. 20 or [email protected]

To purchase tickets for “Swinging on a Star”:


Swinging on a Star Tickets



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 29, 7 pm: An Evening with Barney Frank (To be Held at St. Barnabas Church, 91 Main Street)

    • Wednesday, July 29, 7 pm: Barney Frank: “Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage” (To be held at St. Barnabas Church, 91 Main Street, Falmouth)

Admission: Members, $ 10, Non-Members, $ 15

 

Special “Meet and Greet with Congressman Frank” at the Museums on the Green Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth, MA. This includes a copy of his book, light refreshments, a photo opportunity with the Congressman, and admission to the lecture at 7 pm. Price: $ 50 per person and availability is limited. To purchase tickets, click on below:


Meet & Greet with Barney Frank, July 29, 6:15 pm



 

Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage is one man’s account of the country’s transformation–and the tale of a truly momentous career. Many Americans recall Frank’s lacerating wit, whether it was directed at the Clinton impeachment or the pro-life movement. But the contours of his private and public lives are less well-known. For more than four decades, he was at the center of the struggle for personal freedom and economic fairness. From the battle over AIDS funding in the 1980s to the debates over “big government” during the Clinton years to the 2008 financial crisis, the congressman from Massachusetts played a key role. In 2010, he coauthored the most far-reaching and controversial Wall Street reform bill since the era of the Great Depression, and helped bring about the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.
In this feisty and often moving memoir, Frank candidly discusses the satisfactions, fears, and grudges that come with elected office. He recalls the emotional toll of living in the closet and how his public crusade against homophobia conflicted with his private accommodation of it. He discusses his painful quarrels with allies; his friendships with public figures, from Tip O’Neill to Sonny Bono; and how he found love with his husband, Jim Ready, becoming the first sitting member of Congress to enter a same-sex marriage. He also demonstrates how he used his rhetorical skills to expose his opponents’ hypocrisies and delusions. Through it all, he expertly analyzes the gifts a successful politician must bring to the job, and how even Congress can be made to work.

Wednesday, July 22, 7 pm: Lecture: Alan Driscoll: “War Dogs”

War Dogs have been a part of this country’s military since the early days of World War II.  Unfortunately, the general public knows very little about either their history or the sacrifices and contributions they have made on behalf of the United States.  War Dogs have been responsible for saving thousands of soldier’s lives and the protection of millions of dollars of critical equipment.  In many cases the deeds of these K9 partners are only remembered by their handlers and will, in most cases, be lost to future history.

Mr. Driscoll—one of the first canine handlers in Vietnam and President of “K9s of the War on Terror”,  will illustrate the history of America’s War Dogs from their initial service as part of an American Kennel Club effort to create a “Dog Program” for the military and will trace the development of this capability from that point up to today’s highly-developed dog program managed by the U.S. Air Force.  Along the way the War Dog has been both rewarded for his exploits and been relegated to the status of a piece of equipment that was euthanized when no longer needed.  The current status of the War Dog will also be explained.

July 15: Nigel Hamilton lecture: “The Mantle of Command”

  • Wednesday, July 15, 7 pm: Nigel Hamilton, author of “The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942”

Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt family members, Nigel Hamilton offers a definitive account of FDR’s masterful—and underappreciated—command of the Allied war effort. Hamilton takes readers inside FDR’s White House Oval Study—his personal command center—and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war.  Time and again, FDR was proven right and his allies and generals were wrong. When the generals wanted to attack the Nazi-fortified coast of France, FDR knew the Allied forces weren’t ready. When Churchill insisted his Far East colonies were loyal and would resist the Japanese, Roosevelt knew it was a fantasy. As Hamilton’s account reaches its climax with the Torch landings in North Africa in late 1942, the tide of war turns in the Allies’ favor and FDR’s genius for psychology and military affairs is clear.

July 3rd, 11 am-3 pm: “Free Fun Friday”

Highland Street FoundationAs part of the Highland Street Foundation’s “Free Fun Friday” program, the Museums on the Green will be open FOR FREE on Friday, July 3rd from 11 am to 3 pm.  As part of this event, the following activities will be among the events offered:

* A reading of the Declaration of Independence at noontime

* Free Ice Cream, provided by Smitty’s Ice Cream of Falmouth

* Free Hoodsies, provided by Hood Dairy

* Colonial Games for children

* Complimentary tours of the Museums on the Green campus

*Live music from 1- 2 by The Familiars of Cape Cod 

Please be a part of this exciting day!

 

 

June 30: Allegra Jordan Lecture: “The End of Innocence”

  • Tuesday, June 30, 7 pm: Allegra Jordan, author of “The End of Innocence”

Based on the true story behind a mysterious and controversial World War I memorial at this world-famous university, The End of Innocence sweeps readers from the elaborate elegance of Boston’s high society to Harvard’s hallowed halls to Belgium’s war-ravaged battlefields, offering a powerful and poignant vision of love and hope in the midst of a violent, broken world.

Thursday, June 25, 7 pm: Jonathan Horn, “The Man Who Would Not Be Washington: Robert E. Lee’s Civil War”

On the eve of the Civil War, one soldier embodied the legacy of George Washington and the hopes of leaders across a divided land. Both North and South knew Robert E. Lee as the son of Washington’s most famous eulogist and the son-in-law of Washington’s adopted child. Lee was a brilliant soldier bound by marriage to Washington’s family but ultimately turned by war against Washington’s crowning achievement, the Union. Former White House speechwriter Jonathan Horn follows Lee through married life, military glory, and misfortune. The story that emerges is more complicated, more tragic, and more illuminating than the familiar tale. More complicated because the unresolved question of slavery—the driver of disunion—was among the personal legacies that Lee inherited from Washington. More tragic because the Civil War destroyed the people and places connecting Lee to Washington in agonizing and astonishing ways. More illuminating because the battle for Washington’s legacy shaped the nation that America is today. As Washington was the man who would not be king, Lee was the man who would not be Washington.

June 24: Jeanne Carley lecture: “Folk Art on Cape Cod”

  • Wednesday, June 24, 7 pm: Jeanne Marie Carley, author of “Folk Art of Cape Cod and the Islands”

Jeanne Carley recounts the histories of the hard working, entrepreneurial people of Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket and their role in this nation, as told through the folk art primitives the residents produced from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. The art displayed includes the works of itinerant painters, domestic weavers and quilters, seminary school watercolorists, and carvers in wood, metal, and stone. Among these fascinating items are: paintings including portraits and silhouettes, landscapes and genre paintings; maritime art such as sculpture and scrimshaw; trade figures and signs; carousel art; wood carvings; weathervanes and whirligigs; religious and decorative art; textiles, including quilts and samplers; and gravestones. All of these beautiful and compelling works of art speak eloquently of the human aspirations sparked by the freedom and prosperity offered by the coasts and the bold, clear visual language that ordered these craftsmen’s world.

June 17: David Diamond lecture: “Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Haunted Mind”

  • Wednesday, June 17, 7 pm: David Diamond, “Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Haunted Mind”

In commemorating the 150th anniversary of the death of novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne, we examine a different part of his writings. Hawthorne’s tales and romances exert intense psychological force. Driven by desire, Hawthorne’s characters face painful conflicts with each other, their community and an inescapable conscience. Their troubled past is always threatening to overtake them.  Anticipating Freud by a half a century, Hawthorne exposes the intricate workings of the haunted mind.

June 9: Greg Flemming, “At the Point of a Cutlass”

Tuesday, June 9, 7 pm: Greg Flemming, author of “At the Point of a Cutlass: The Pirate Capture, Bold Escape and Lonely Exile of Philip Ashton”

Based on a rare manuscript from 1725, At the Point of a Cutlass uncovers the amazing voyage of Philip Ashton — a nineteen-year old fisherman who was captured by pirates, escaped on an uninhabited Caribbean island, and then miraculously arrived back home three years later to tell his incredible story.

     Taken in a surprise attack near Nova Scotia in June 1722, Ashton was forced to sail across the Atlantic and back with a crew under the command of Edward Low, a man so vicious he tortured victims by slicing off an ear or nose and roasting them over a fire. Ashton barely survived the nine months he sailed with Low’s crew — he was nearly shot in the head at gunpoint, came close to drowning when a ship sank near the coast of Brazil, and was almost hanged for secretly plotting a revolt against the pirates. Like many forced men, Ashton thought constantly about escaping. In March of 1723, he saw his chance when Low’s crew anchored at the secluded island of Roatan, at the western edge of the Caribbean. Ashton fled into the thick, overgrown woods and, for more than a year, had to claw out a living on the remote strip of land, completely alone and with practically nothing to sustain him. The opportunity to escape came so unexpectedly that Ashton ran off without a gun, a knife, or even a pair of shoes on his feet. Yet the resilient young castaway — who has been called America’s real-life Robinson Crusoe — was able to find food, build a crude shelter, and even survive a debilitating fever brought on by the cool winter rains before he was rescued by a band of men sailing near the island. Based on Ashton’s own first-hand account, as well trial records, logbooks, and a wealth of other archival evidence, At the Point of a Cutlass pieces together the unforgettable story of a man thrust into the violent world of a pirate ship and his daring survival and escape.

Walking Tours of Falmouth: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 am, June through October

A Walk Through Falmouth’s History!  Join us on this 90 minute walk which starts and ends at our Hallett Barn Visitors’ Center, 55 Palmer Avenue. Each guided walk takes the visitor past a variety of structures and neighborhoods from Falmouth’s historic past. Visitors are asked to wear comfortable walking shoes and bring drinking water with them. Cost is $ 5 per walker and reservations are requested. Please come to the Visitors’ Center by 9:45.

Walks will happen each week if weather permits.

2015 schedule: Walks begin Tuesday, June 9th and go until Thursday, October 8th.

June 4: Leila Fawaz lecture: “A Land of Aching Hearts”

  • Thursday, June 4, 7 pm: Leila Fawaz, author of “A Land of Aching Hearts: The Middle East in the Great War”

The Great War transformed the Middle East, bringing to an end four hundred years of Ottoman rule in Arab lands while giving rise to the Middle East as we know it today. Among those who suffered were the people of Greater Syria—comprising modern Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, and Palestine—as well as the people of Turkey, Iraq, and Egypt. Beyond the shifting fortunes of the battlefield, the region was devastated by a British and French naval blockade made worse by Ottoman war measures. Famine, disease, inflation, and an influx of refugees were everyday realities. But the local populations were not passive victims. The war’s aftermath proved bitter for many survivors. Nationalist aspirations were quashed as Britain and France divided the Middle East along artificial borders that still cause resentment. The misery of the Great War, and a profound sense of huge sacrifices made in vain, would color people’s views of politics and the West for the century to come.Leila Fawaz chronicles the initiative and resilience of civilian émigrés, entrepreneurs, draft-dodgers, soldiers, villagers, and townsmen determined to survive the war as best they could. The right mix of ingenuity and practicality often meant the difference between life and death.

May 21: John Barylick lecture: “Killer Show”

  • Thursday, May 21, 7 pm: John Barylick, author of “Killer Show: The Station Nightclub Fire”

On February 20, 2003, the deadliest rock concert in U.S. history took place at a roadhouse called The Station in West Warwick, Rhode Island. That night, in the few minutes it takes to play a hard-rock standard, the fate of many of the unsuspecting nightclub patrons was determined with awful certainty. The blaze was ignited when pyrotechnics set off by Great White, a 1980s heavy-metal band, lit flammable polyurethane “egg crate” foam sound insulation on the club’s walls. In less than 10 minutes, 96 people were dead and 200 more were injured, many catastrophically. The final death toll topped out, three months later, at the eerily unlikely round number of 100. The story of the fire, its causes, and its legal and human aftermath is one of lives put at risk by petty economic decisions—by a band, club owners, promoters, building inspectors, and product manufacturers. Any one of those decisions, made differently, might have averted the tragedy. Together, however, they reached a fatal critical mass. ”Killer Show” is the first comprehensive exploration of the chain of events leading up to the fire, the conflagration itself, and the painstaking search for evidence to hold the guilty to account and obtain justice for the victims.

May 20: Casey Sherman and David Wedge: “Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy”

  • Wednesday, May 20, 7 pm: Casey Sherman and David Wedge, “Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy” (To Be Held at St. Barnabas Church, 91 Main Street, Falmouth)

Veteran journalists Casey Sherman and Dave Wedge have written the definitive inside look at the Boston Marathon bombings with a unique, Boston-based account of the events that riveted the world. From the Tsarnaev brothers’ years leading up to the act of terror to the bomb scene itself (which both authors witnessed first-hand within minutes of the blast), from the terrifying police shootout with the suspects to the ultimate capture of the younger brother, Boston Strong: A City’s Triumph over Tragedy reports all the facts—and so much more. Based on months of intensive interviews, this is the first book to tell the entire story through the eyes of those who experienced it. From the cop first on the scene, to the detectives assigned to the manhunt, the authors provide a behind-the-scenes look at the investigation. More than a true-crime book, Boston Strong also tells the tragic but ultimately life-affirming story of the victims and their recoveries and gives voice to those who lost loved ones.

Bus Trip to Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum May 19th

On Tuesday, May 19th, the Museums on the Green will take a motorcoach to Provincetown, MA to visit the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum. The monument was built in 1907 to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrims (who originally stopped in Provincetown before continuing on to Plymouth). It was there that the Pilgrims signed the “Mayflower Compact” and the museum itself celebrates Provincetown’s rich maritime past.

The bus will depart from Falmouth at 9 am on May 19th and leave Provincetown at 3 pm.

Tickets are $ 45 per person, which includes the bus trip and museum admission.

Lunch is not included and will be handled by each individual.

To make a reservation, simply click on the link below or call 508-548-4857, ext. 11:


Provincetown Bus Tour May 19, 2015



 
 

 
 

 

 
 
 

 

May 19: Michael McNaught lecture: “Gallipoli”

  • Tuesday, May 19, 7 pm: Michael McNaught, “The Battle of Gallipoli, 1915”

During World War I, Allies England and France teamed up to create a naval passage to their allies in Russia through the Straits of the Dardanelles. The attack was repelled by the Ottoman Empire and led to the resignation and near ruin of Secretary of the Navy Winston Churchill. The campaign was one of the greatest Ottoman victories during the war and a major Allied failure. In Turkey, it is regarded as a defining moment in the nation’s history: a final surge in the defense of the motherland as the Ottoman Empire crumbled. The struggle formed the basis for the Turkish War of Independence and the founding of the Republic of Turkey eight years later under Mustafa Kemal Atatürk who first rose to prominence as a commander at Gallipoli.

Saturday, May 16, 4pm: Roseanne Montillo lecture: “The Wilderness of Ruin”

  • Saturday, May 16, 4 pm: Roseanne Montillo, “The Wilderness of Ruin: A Tale of Madness, Boston’s Great Fire and the Hunt for America’s Youngest Serial Killer”

In the early 1870s, local children begin disappearing from the working-class neighborhoods of Boston. Several return home bloody and bruised after being tortured, while others never come back.. With the city on edge, authorities believe the abductions are the handiwork of a psychopath, until they discover that their killer—fourteen-year-old Jesse Pomeroy—is barely older than his victims. The criminal investigation that follows sparks a debate among the world’s most revered medical minds, and will have a decades-long impact on the judicial system and medical consciousness.

“The Wilderness of Ruin”  is a riveting tale of gruesome murder and depravity. At its heart is Gilded Age Boston , divided by class—a chasm that widens in the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1872, and the genteel cobblestone streets of Beacon Hill to the squalid, overcrowded tenements of Southie. .. Here, too, is the writer Herman Melville. Enthralled by the child killer’s case, he enlists physician Oliver Wendell Holmes to help him understand how it might relate to his own mental instability.

May 14: Lorri Glover lecture: “Founders as Fathers”

  • Thursday, May 14, 7 pm: Lorri Glover, author of “Founders as Fathers: The Private Lives and Politics of the American Revolutionaries”lglover1@slu.edu Lorri Glover-Author

     

How did family life shaped the political careers of America’s great Founding Fathers—men like George Mason, Patrick Henry, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison?  Historian Lorri Glover brings to life the vexing, joyful, arduous, and sometimes tragic experiences of the architects of the American Republic who, while building a nation, were also raising families.
The costs and consequences for the families of these Virginia leaders were great.  The Revolution remade family life no less than it reinvented political institutions. “Founders as Fathers” describes the colonial households that nurtured future revolutionaries, follows the development of political and family values during the revolutionary years, and shines new light on the radically transformed world that was inherited by nineteenth-century descendants.

This lecture made possible in part by a grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council.

 

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“A Walk Through Falmouth’s Past” Ceramic Art Exhibit–May 8 through June 11, 2015

A Walk Through Falmouth’s Past,” an exhibition featuring works by ceramic art students from Falmouth High School, will be on view in the Cultural Center from May 8 to June 11.  The show is the result of collaboration between the students and Falmouth Historical Society. Last winter, 40 Ceramics II students and 15 Ceramics III students visited Museums on the Green and met with staff and volunteers to learn more about significant periods of Falmouth’s past, such as Wampanoag culture, the whaling industry, and the Victorian era, to name a few. The goal was to further educate the students about their town, while also providing artistic inspiration for learning new ceramics techniques. The project is funded by a grant from Falmouth Education Foundation awarded to FHS ceramics art instructor Corine Adams.whale teapot

The Ceramics II students learned how to make ceramic teapots and tea cups using the potter’s wheel, each portraying the historical era of their choosing. Ceramics III students created a large garden totem composed of 15 individual pieces, also reflective of a chosen time in history, and, using the potter’s wheel, created the base for the totem piece. The students constructed a unique three-dimensional design which will withstand the elements for permanent outdoor display in the Museum’s Memorial Park, to serve as an interactive scavenger hunt for youngsters to learn and discover more about local history.

April 28, 7 pm: Barbara Berenson lecture: “Boston and the Civil War”

  • Tuesday, April 28, 7 pm: Barbara Berenson, author of “Boston and the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution”

Boston’s black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many to join the abolitionists. March to war with Boston’s brave soldiers, including the grandson of Patriot Paul Revere and the Fighting Irish. The all-black Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment battled against both slavery and discrimination, while Boston’s women fought tirelessly against slavery and for their own right to be full citizens of the Union.

April 21: James Coogan lecture: “Slavery on Cape Cod”

  • Tuesday, April 21, 7 pm: James Coogan, “Slavery, Indenture and Abolition on Cape Cod”

Many people on Cape Cod owned slaves right up to the Revolutionary period. Indenture was a common way for people without means to get to this area making an arrangement to be contracted as servants for a set period of time, then to gain their freedom.  There were strict rules as to how indenture was carried out here and penalties for those who abused their servants. And the Abolition movement in this area mirrored what was going on in the northeast of the U.S. Falmouth women were some of the early letter writers to Congress opposing slavery.  .  Much of the negative sentiment in Falmouth reflected the close connection between people in Savannah and Charleston, S.C. who had Falmouth connections either by trade or spending summers on the Cape.

April 8: Belinda Rathbone lecture: “The Boston Raphael”

  • Wednesday, April 8, 7 pm: Belinda Rathbone, author of “The Boston Raphael”

On the eve of its centennial celebrations in December, 1969, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts announced the acquisition of an unknown and uncatalogued painting attributed to Raphael. Boston’s coup made headlines around the world. Soon afterward, an Italian art sleuth began investigating the details of the painting’s export from Italy, challenging the museum’s right to ownership. Simultaneously, experts on both sides of the Atlantic lined up to debate its very authenticity. While these contests played themselves out on the international stage, the crisis deepened within the museum as its charismatic director, Perry T. Rathbone, faced the most challenging crossroads of his thirty-year career. The Boston Raphael was a media sensation in its time, but the full story of the forces that converged on the museum and how they intersected with the challenges of the Sixties is now revealed in full detail by the director’s daughter.

April 1: Megan Mayhew Bergman lecture, “Almost Famous Women”

The fascinating lives of the characters in “Almost Famous Women” have mostly been forgotten, but their stories are burning to be told. Nearly every story in this dazzling collection is based on a woman who attained some celebrity–she raced speed boats or was a conjoined twin in show business; a reclusive painter of renown; a member of the first all-female, integrated swing band. We see Lord Byron’s illegitimate daughter, Allegra; Oscar Wilde’s troubled niece, Dolly; “West With the Night” author Beryl Markham; Edna St. Vincent Millay’s sister, Norma. These extraordinary stories travel the world, explore the past (and delve into the future), and portray fiercely independent women defined by their acts of bravery, creative impulses, and sometimes reckless decisions.

The world hasn’t always been kind to unusual women, but through Megan Mayhew Bergman’s alluring depictions they finally receive the attention they deserve. “Almost Famous Women” is a gorgeous collection from an “accomplished writer of short fiction”

March 27, 3 pm: C. Michael Hiam lecture: “Dirigible Dreams”

  • Friday, March 27: C. Michael Hiam, author of “Dirigible Dreams: The Age of the Airship”

Here is the story of airships—manmade flying machines without wings—from their earliest beginnings to the modern era of blimps. In postcards and advertisements, the sleek, silver, cigar-shaped airships, or dirigibles, were the embodiment of futuristic visions of air travel. They immediately captivated the imaginations of people worldwide, but in less than fifty years dirigible became a byword for doomed futurism, an Icarian figure of industrial hubris. “Dirigible Dreams” looks back on this bygone era, when the future of exploration, commercial travel, and warfare largely involved the prospect of wingless flight.

Thursday, Feb. 19: Bob Ryan, author of “Scribe: My Life in Sports”

  • Thursday, February 19, 7 pm: Bob Ryan, author of “Scribe: My Life in Sports”
  • NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS CHURCH, 91 W. MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH, MA

Born in 1946 in Trenton, New Jersey, Bob Ryan cut his teeth going with his father to the Polo Grounds and Connie Mack Stadium, and to college basketball games at the Palestra in Philadelphia when it was the epicenter of the college game. As a young man, he became sports editor of his high school paper-and in 1968 at age twenty-three, he joined the Boston Globe, he was handed the Boston Celtics beat as the Bill Russell era ended and the Dave Cowens one began. His all-star career was launched. Ever since, his insight as a reporter and skills as a writer have been matched by an ability to connect with people-players, management, the reading public-probably because, at heart, he has always been as much a fan as a reporter. More than anything, Scribe reveals the people behind the stories, as only Bob Ryan can, from the NBA to eleven Olympics to his surprising favorite sport to cover-golf-and much more.

March 13: Susan Playfair lecture: “America’s Founding Fruit”

  • Friday, March 13, 3 pm: Susan Playfair, author of “America’s Founding Fruit: The Cranberry in a New Environment”

The cranberry is one of only three cultivated fruits native to North America. The story of this perennial vine began as the glaciers retreated about fifteen thousand years ago. Centuries later, it kept Native Americans and Pilgrims alive through the winter months, played a role in a diplomatic gesture to King Charles in 1677, protected sailors on board whaling ships from scurvy, fed General Grant’s men in 1864, and provided over a million pounds of sustenance per year to our World War II doughboys. Today, it is a powerful tool in the fight against various forms of cancer. T America’s Founding Fruit presents a brief history of cranberry cultivation and its role in our national history, discusses the entire cultivation process from planting through distribution, and assesses the possible effects of climate change on the cranberry and other plants and animals.

Feb. 26: Christian Appy lecture: “American Reckoning”

  • Thursday, February 26, 7 pm: Christian Appy, author of “American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity”

How did the Vietnam War change the way we think of ourselves as a people and a nation? “American Reckoning” examines the relationship between the war’s realities and myths and its impact on our national identity, conscience, pride, shame, popular culture, and postwar foreign policy.
Drawing on a vast variety of sources from movies, songs, and novels to official documents, media coverage, and contemporary commentary, the author offers an original interpretation of the war and its far-reaching consequences.

Feb. 20: Michael Greenburg lecture: “The Court-Martial of Paul Revere” (3 PM)

  • Friday, February 20: Michael Greenburg, author of “The Court-Martial of Paul Revere”
  • NOTE: SPECIAL TIME: 3 PM

At the height of the American Revolution in 1779, Massachusetts launched the Penobscot Expedition, a massive military and naval undertaking designed to force the British from the strategically important coast of Maine. What should have been an easy victory for the larger American force quickly descended into a quagmire of arguing, disobedience, and failed strategy. In the end, not only did the British retain their stronghold, but the entire flotilla of American vessels was lost in what became the worst American naval disaster prior to Pearl Harbor. In the inevitable finger-pointing that followed the debacle, the already-famous Lieutenant Colonel Paul Revere, commissioned as the expedition’s artillery commander, was shockingly charged by fellow officers with neglect of duty, disobeying orders, and cowardice. Though he was not formally condemned by the court of inquiry, rumors still swirled around Boston concerning his role in the disaster, and so the fiery Revere spent the next several years of his life actively pursuing a court-martial, in an effort to resuscitate the one thing he valued above all—his reputation.

Feb. 18: Jamie Malanowski lecture: “Commander Will Cushing”

  • Wednesday, February 18: Jamie Malanowski, author of “Commander Will Cushing: Daredevil Hero of the Civil War”

October 1864. The confederate ironclad CSS Albemarle had sunk two federal warships and damaged seven others, taking control of the Roanoke River and threatening the Union blockade. Twenty-one-year-old navy lieutenant William Barker Cushing hatched a daring plan: to attack the fearsome warship with a few dozen men in two small wooden boats. What followed, the close-range torpedoing of the Albemarle and Cushing’s harrowing two-day escape downriver from vengeful Rebel posses, is one of the most dramatic individual exploits in American military history.

Theodore Roosevelt said that Cushing “comes next to Farragut on the hero roll of American naval history,” but most have never heard of him today. Tossed out of the Naval Academy for “buffoonery,” Cushing proved himself a prodigy in behind-the-lines warfare. Given command of a small union ship, he performed daring, near-suicidal raids, “cutting out” confederate ships and thwarting blockade runners. With higher commands and larger ships, Cushing’s exploits grow bolder, culminating in the sinking of the Albemarle. Cushing served with bravery and heroism. But he was irascible and complicated—a loveable rogue, prideful and impulsive, who nonetheless possessed a genius for combat.

March 10, 7 pm: Lecture: Dick Lehr, “The Birth of a Nation”

  • Tuesday, March 10, 7 pm: Dick Lehr, author of “The Birth of a Nation: How a Legendary Filmmaker and a Crusading Editor Re-ignited America’s Civil War”

In 1915, two men—one a journalist agitator, the other a technically brilliant filmmaker—incited a public confrontation that roiled America, pitting black against white, Hollywood against Boston, and free speech against civil rights.
Monroe Trotter and D. W. Griffith were fighting over a film that dramatized the Civil War and Reconstruction in a post-Confederate South. Almost fifty years earlier, Monroe’s father, James, was a sergeant in an all-black Union regiment that marched into Charleston, South Carolina, just as the Kentucky cavalry—including Roaring Jack Griffith, D. W.’s father—fled for their lives. Griffith’s film, The Birth of a Nation, included actors in blackface, heroic portraits of Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, and a depiction of Lincoln’s assassination. Freed slaves were portrayed as villainous, vengeful, slovenly, and dangerous to the sanctity of American values. It was tremendously successful, eventually seen by 25 million Americans. But violent protests against the film flared up across the country.
Monroe Trotter’s titanic crusade to have the film censored became a blueprint for dissent during the 1950s and 1960s. This is the fiery story of a revolutionary moment for mass media and the nascent civil rights movement, and the men clashing over the cultural and political soul of a still-young America standing at the cusp of its greatest days.

Saturday, November 8: Military History Symposium, 9 am to 1 pm

On Saturday, November 8th, beginning at 9 am and finishing by 1 pm, the Falmouth Museums on the Green, 55 Palmer Avenue, present a very special Veterans Day weekend event. To honor those who serve and have served in the United States Armed Forces, the Museums will play host to the South Shore Military History Roundtable’s annual symposium of American Military history, offering a variety of topics intended to engage the audience about our military past and heritage.

2014 Military History Symposium Speakers:

  • Lawrence Verria, author of “The Kissing Sailor: The Mystery Behind the Photo that Ended World War II”
  • Brad King, Executive Director of Battleship Cove, Fall River, MA: “The Dambusters of World War II”
  • Thomas Dresser, author of “Martha’s Vineyard in World War II”
  • Ronald Peterson, Secretary, Orleans Historical Society, “The Attack on Orleans During World War I”
  • James Ellis, author of “A Ruinous and Unhappy War: New England and the War of 1812”

  Admission to this program is $ 10 for Museums on the Green members and veterans; $ 15 for non-members.  Active military is free.  Reservations are not required.

Saturday, October 25: A Visit With the Night Watchman

The  Museums on the Green would like you to begin your Halloween weekend by visiting their haunted lair.  On Saturday, October 25th from 6 to 9 pm, you are cordially invited to make “A Visit with the Night Watchman”!

In the weeks prior to All Hallows Eve, spirits and memories come alive in old houses after dark.

Strange creatures inhabit the night, and only the Night Watchman has seen them!  Now, you can join the Night Watchman to see and learn what spirits lurk inside the 1790 Doctor Francis Wicks House.

 The Watchman’s tour is for adults and children over 6 years of age, accompanied by an adult.

Tours leave every 15 minutes and reservations are suggested.

 Prices: $ 6 adults, $ 5 children and senior citizens.

$ 20 per family (up to 4 people)

To make a reservation, call 508-548-4857 or email [email protected]. This event is rain or shine, and it is made possible through the assistance of Chapman, Cole and Gleason Funeral Homes.

October 21: Barbara Sillery, “The Haunting of Cape Cod and the Islands”

Tuesday, October 21st, 7pm: “The Haunting of Cape Cod and the Islands”

Encounter the friendly spirits and irritable phantoms of Cape Cod. Secret padded rooms, candles that relight themselves, and furniture that moves are only a few of the abnormalities to be discovered in the inns, restaurants, and private homes of Cape Cod. Ranging from whimsical to ominous, each ghost has its own story and family history. This collection includes the misfortunes of pirate captain Sam Bellamy, who died in one of the worst Cape storms to date. Using extensive interviews and research, author Barbara Sillery recounts both the written and oral spectral histories of each location.

November 13: Peter Duffy, “Double Agent”

  • Thursday, November 13, 7 pm: Lecture, 7 pm: Peter Duffy, “Double Agent: The First Hero of World War II and How the FBI Outwitted and Destroyed a Nazi Spy Ring”

From the time Adolf Hitler came into power in 1933, German spies were active in New York. In 1937, a German national living in Queens stole the blueprints for the country’s most precious secret, the Norden Bombsight, delivering them to the German military two years before World War II started in Europe and four years before the US joined the fight. When the FBI uncovered a ring of Nazi spies in the city, President Franklin Roosevelt formally declared J. Edgar Hoover as America’s spymaster with responsibility for overseeing all investigations. As war began in Europe in 1939, a naturalized German-American was recruited by the Nazis to set up a radio transmitter and collect messages from spies active in the city to send back to Nazi spymasters in Hamburg. This German-American, William G. Sebold, approached the FBI and became the first double agent in the Bureau’s history, the center of a sixteen-month investigation that led to the arrest of a colorful cast of thirty-three enemy agents, among them a South African adventurer with an exotic accent and a monocle and a Jewish femme fatale, Lilly Stein, who escaped Nazi Vienna by offering to seduce US military men into whispering secrets into her ear.
A riveting, meticulously researched, and fast-moving story, Double Agent details the largest and most important espionage bust in American history.

October 16: Katherine Howe, “The Penguin Book of Witches”

  • Thursday, October 16, 7 pm: Lecture: Katherine Howe: “The Penguin Book of Witches”

From a manual for witch hunters written by King James himself in 1597, to court documents from the Salem witch trials of 1692, to newspaper coverage of a woman stoned to death on the streets of Philadelphia while the Continental Congress met, The Penguin Book of Witches is a treasury of historical accounts of accused witches that sheds light on the reality behind the legends. Bringing to life stories like that of Eunice Cole, tried for attacking a teenage girl with a rock and buried with a stake through her heart; Jane Jacobs, a Bostonian so often accused of witchcraft that she took her tormentors to court on charges of slander; and Increase Mather, an exorcism-performing minister famed for his knowledge of witches, this volume provides a unique tour through the darkest history of English and North American witchcraft.

October 2: Michael Blanding, “The Map Thief”

  • Thursday, October 2, 7 pm: Lecture: Michael Blanding: “The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of a Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Rare Maps”

Maps have long exerted a special fascination on viewers—both as beautiful works of art and as practical tools to navigate the world. But to those who collect them, the map trade can be a cutthroat business, inhabited by quirky and sometimes disreputable characters in search of a finite number of extremely rare objects.
 
Once considered a respectable antiquarian map dealer, E. Forbes Smiley spent years doubling as a map thief —until he was finally arrested slipping maps out of books in the Yale University library. The Map Thief delves into the untold history of this fascinating high-stakes criminal and the inside story of the industry that consumed him.

Acclaimed reporter Michael Blanding has interviewed all the key players in this stranger-than-fiction story, and shares the fascinating histories of maps that charted the New World, and how they went from being practical instruments to quirky heirlooms to highly coveted objects. Though pieces of the map theft story have been written before, Blanding is the first reporter to explore the story in full—and had the rare privilege of having access to Smiley himself after he’d gone silent in the wake of his crimes. Moreover, although Smiley swears he has admitted to all of the maps he stole, libraries claim he stole hundreds more—and offer intriguing clues to prove it. Now, through a series of exclusive interviews with Smiley and other key individuals, Blanding teases out an astonishing tale of destruction and redemption.

 

Sunday, September 21: Portrayal: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Revere

  • Sunday, September 21, 2:30 pm: Re-enactment performance: “The Revere’s Ride Again!”

Character re-enactors Lee K. Riethmiller and Jessa S. Piaia will present a living history portrayal of Paul and Rachel Revere, in the program set in 1805, entitled “Meet Noted Patriots, the Reveres, Paul & Rachel Revere Ride Again!”  Paul Revere married Rachel Walker within five months of the passing of his first wife, Sarah, who died following the birth of their sixth child; Rachel took on the care of the children, and with Paul had six more of their own.  Clad in period attire, Lee and Jessa portray this early 19th century couple of “forthright hospitality and remarkable good humour,” as they relate episodes of their life both during and after the American Revolution.  The program runs about 50 minutes in length, with Q&A discussion to follow, and is appropriate for ages 10 to adult.The dramatization animates the “Spirit of the Day,” as Paul & Rachel recount the exciting tale of life in Boston’s North End when America was still a British Crown Colony.  Hear about the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party which he participated in, and the stirring events that led to the famous Midnight Ride in April 1775.  Relive the drama of Colonial unrest that culminated in America’s Revolution, and what followed after the framing of our Declaration of Independence from Britain and the United States Constitution, when Paul Revere ventured from being a respected artisan into being a successful industrialist in Canton, Massachusetts, during the early days of the new Republic.

 

 

September 17: Hugh Howard, “Mr. and Mrs. Madison’s War”

  • Wednesday, September 17: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Hugh Howard discusses his book “Mr. and Mrs. Madison’s War: America’s First Couple and the Second War of Independence”

August 28, 1814. Dressed in black, James Madison mourns the nation’s loss. Smoke rises from the ruin of the Capitol before him; a mile away stands the blackened shell of the White House. The British have laid waste to Washington City, and as Mr. Madison gazes at the terrible vista, he ponders the future-his country’s defeat or victory-in a war he began over the unanimous objections of his political adversaries. As we approach its bicentennial, the War of 1812 remains the least understood of America’s wars. To some it was a conflict that resolved nothing, but to others, it was our second war of independence, settling once and for all that America would never again submit to Britain. At its center was James Madison-our most meditative of presidents, yet the first one to declare war. And at his side was the extraordinary Dolley, who defined the role of first lady for all to follow, and who would prove perhaps her husband’s most indispensable ally.

September 10: Chip Bishop: “Quentin and Flora”

  • Wednesday, September 10: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Chip Bishop discusses his book “Quentin and Flora: A Roosevelt and a Vanderbilt in Love during the Great War”

For the first time, the compelling tale of Quentin Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest son, and his secret fiancée, Flora Payne Whitney, is told in rich and absorbing detail by New York Times Bestselling-Author Chip Bishop. At the ebb of the Gilded Age, young Quentin is the scion of America most celebrated political family. And lovely Flora is the privileged daughter of the Whitneys and the Vanderbilts, two of the nation’s richest dynasties. The lives of Quentin and Flora intersect at the dawn of the Great War in Europe after each has grown up in the public spotlight – he in the White House and she in the storied mansions of New York and Newport. His childhood precociousness charms the nation and parallels Flora’s envelopment in her parents’ worlds of high art, luxury yachts and personal unfaithfulness. Quentin and Flora reach beyond their families’ orbits to begin a searching adolescent companionship that evolves inexorably into a fairy tale romance, challenged by the danger of war and a vast and perilous ocean. Through their actual letters, deeply unexplored for a hundred years, we share their youthful dreams and desires, and partake in the agony of their separation amid encircling, high-level political intrigue.

  • Wednesday, September 10: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Chip Bishop discusses his book “Quentin and Flora: A Roosevelt and a Vanderbilt in Love during the Great War”

For the first time, the compelling tale of Quentin Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest son, and his secret fiancée, Flora Payne Whitney, is told in rich and absorbing detail by New York Times Bestselling-Author Chip Bishop. At the ebb of the Gilded Age, young Quentin is the scion of America most celebrated political family. And lovely Flora is the privileged daughter of the Whitneys and the Vanderbilts, two of the nation’s richest dynasties. The lives of Quentin and Flora intersect at the dawn of the Great War in Europe after each has grown up in the public spotlight – he in the White House and she in the storied mansions of New York and Newport. His childhood precociousness charms the nation and parallels Flora’s envelopment in her parents’ worlds of high art, luxury yachts and personal unfaithfulness. Quentin and Flora reach beyond their families’ orbits to begin a searching adolescent companionship that evolves inexorably into a fairy tale romance, challenged by the danger of war and a vast and perilous ocean. Through their actual letters, deeply unexplored for a hundred years, we share their youthful dreams and desires, and partake in the agony of their separation amid encircling, high-level political intrigue.

August 5: John Kasson: “The Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression”

  • Tuesday, August 5: Lecture, 7 pm: Author John Kasson discusses his book “The Little Girl Who Fought the Great Depression: Shirley Temple and 1930’s America”

Her image appeared in periodicals and advertisements roughly twenty times daily; she rivaled FDR and Edward VIII as the most photographed person in the world. Her portrait brightened the homes of countless admirers: from a black laborer’s cabin in South Carolina and young Andy Warhol’s house in Pittsburgh to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover’s recreation room in Washington, DC, and gangster “Bumpy” Johnson’s Harlem apartment. A few years later her smile cheered the secret bedchamber of Anne Frank in Amsterdam as young Anne hid from the Nazis.

For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world’s box-office champion, a record never equaled. By early 1935 her mail was reported as four thousand letters a week, and hers was the second-most popular girl’s name in the country. What distinguished Shirley Temple from every other Hollywood star of the period—and everyone since—was how brilliantly she shone. Amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come. Distinguished cultural historian John F. Kasson shows how the most famous, adored, imitated, and commodified child in the world astonished movie goers, created a new international culture of celebrity, and revolutionized the role of children as consumers.

July 30: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, “The House that Ruth Built”

  • Wednesday, July 30: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Robert Weintraub discusses his book “The House that Ruth Built: A New Stadium, The First Yankees Championship, and the Redemption of 1923”

Weintraub examines the 1923 New York Yankees, the team that opened Yankee Stadium and won the first of the Bronx Bombers’ record 27 World Series titles. The center of this work is the clash between the Yankees’ star, Babe Ruth, with his new “bashing” style of playing the game, and the classic “scientific baseball” epitomized by manager John McGraw and his New York Giants. While the Giants got the best of the Yanks in the ’22 fall classic, Ruth and the Yankees’ 1923 World Series victory over their crosstown rivals would change the face of baseball and New York City forever.. Weintraub details everything from the construction of the stadium and the careers of Ruth and McGraw to a detailed season overview and deconstruction of the 1923 World Series.

  • Wednesday, July 30: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Robert Weintraub discusses his book “The House that Ruth Built: A New Stadium, The First Yankees Championship, and the Redemption of 1923”

Weintraub examines the 1923 New York Yankees, the team that opened Yankee Stadium and won the first of the Bronx Bombers’ record 27 World Series titles. The center of this work is the clash between the Yankees’ star, Babe Ruth, with his new “bashing” style of playing the game, and the classic “scientific baseball” epitomized by manager John McGraw and his New York Giants. While the Giants got the best of the Yanks in the ’22 fall classic, Ruth and the Yankees’ 1923 World Series victory over their crosstown rivals would change the face of baseball and New York City forever.. Weintraub details everything from the construction of the stadium and the careers of Ruth and McGraw to a detailed season overview and deconstruction of the 1923 World Series.

Summer Wind Centennial: Honoring 100 Years of the Falmouth Chamber of Commerce

  Join us for a cocktail party featuring the music of Solon Z and the Sapphires performing the songs of Frank Sinatra.  We will be offering cocktails and hors d’oeuvres from a selection of Falmouth’s top caterers and restaurants!  See you on the dance floor!  There will be a fabulous indoor exhibit which will feature many of the Chamber’s original members and historic photos of Falmouth businesses.

Date:  Friday, August 8, 2014
Time:  5:30pm-8:00pm
Place:  Falmouth Museums on the Green
55 and 65 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth, MA
Reservations Required: $50 per person (Tax-deductible portion $20)
***ADDITIONAL PARKING AT ST. BARNABAS CHURCH***across from the Village Green!
To purchase tickets:




Summer Wind Centennial Tickets







Call Kelly Benway to join our generous sponsors who have donated to this event!  508.548.4857

Platinum Sponsor $2,500

Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank

Gold Sponsor $1,500

Solon Z and the Sapphires, The Gathered Table

Silver Sponsors $1,000

Atria Woodbriar, Chef Roland’s Catering, Christy Lynch Designs, Eat Your Heart Out Catering, Joe Brodsky Builder and La Cucina Sul Mar

Copper Sponsor $500

Caroline & Jim Lloyd, Mashpee Orthodontics, Salt Pond Realty LLP, The Wandering Florist

Iron Sponsor $250

Mark Penta, Caricature Artist, Roche Bros.

Just for Kids: Colonial Gardening, Saturday, May 10th

JUST FOR KIDS: COLONIAL GARDENING

Saturday May 10th

10am-12pm

 What do insect repellant, house paint, and food seasonings have in common?  In colonial New England, they were all made from plants!  Come and learn about the surprising uses of many common (and not so common) herbs and flowers.  Make a mini colonial garden to take home–a perfect gift for Mother’s Day!
 
Cost: $ 5 per child

Big Ryan’s Tall Tales

Big Ryan’s Tall Tales, Friday, July 18th, 11:00 am

Big Ryan’s Tall Tales has been telling stories to children for over a decade. This program includes Big Ryan’s original stories, puppet play, a bit of music and movement and a whole lot of fun! These programs usually go from 45 minutes to an hour and are appropriate for preschool all the way to 5th grade.

Admission: $ 10 per child

Tuesday, May 13, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Nathaniel Philbrick, “Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution”

  • Tuesday, May 13: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses his book “Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution

NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 91 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord.  In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists.
Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control.
With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.

Friday, September 12th, 7 pm: Matthew Stewart Lecture

Friday, September 12th, 7 pm: Author Matthew Stewart comes to Falmouth to discuss his book “Nature’s God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic”

A startling, paradigm-shifting exploration of the revolutionary part of the American Revolution: the ideas that changed the world for good. 

Erudite Thomas Jefferson, wily Ben Franklin, rough-hewn General Ethan Allen, and Thomas Young (the forgotten Founder who instigated the Boston Tea Party)-the radicals who founded America set their sights on a revolution of the mind. Derided as “infidels” and “atheists” in their own time, they wanted liberation not just from one king but from the tyranny of supernatural religion. The ideas that inspired them were neither British nor Christian but largely ancient, pagan, and continental: the fecund universe of the dreaded Lucretius; the potent (but nontranscendent) natural divinity of the heretic Spinoza.

From the true meaning of “nature’s God” and “self-evident” in the Declaration of Independence to the sources of our success in science, medicine, the arts, religious toleration, and democratic governance, Matthew Stewart’s lucid and passionate investigation surprises, challenges, enlightens, and entertains as a philosophical detective story of the highest order.

Heritage Award Sponsorship and Advertising Levels

Falmouth Historical Society

15th Annual Heritage Dinner

Honoring Elizabeth Heald Arthur and Sally Manny Cross

April 9, 2014 at the Coonamessett Inn

Sponsorship Opportunities 

All business sponsors will enjoy the following benefits:

  • Your business will be acknowledged in the event program distributed to all attendees.
  • Your business will be acknowledged on placards at the event.
  • Your business will be acknowledged on our website for the fiscal year.
  • Your business will be thanked in the Falmouth Enterprise following the event.

Choose your level of sponsorship from the following.

$500 Tulip Level

In addition to the benefits listed above, you will receive two tickets to the Heritage Dinner. 

$1,000 Rose Level

In addition to the benefits listed above, you will receive four tickets to the Heritage Dinner. 

$1,500 Orchid Level

In addition to the benefits listed above You will receive a full table of 8 tickets to the Heritage Dinner.

  • Your table will have preferred placement in the dining room.
  • Your business will have a reserved sign on your table with your company name and logo.

Advertising Options

  • $250 half  page advertisement in our event program
  • $100 business card size advertisement in our event program

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor or an advertiser for this event, please contact Kelly Benway at [email protected]

Sunday, March 16: An Introduction to Irish Step Dancing

Sunday, March 16, 2:30 pm: An Introduction to Irish Step Dancing

Tickets: $ 10 per adult, $ 5 per child age 12 and younger

Everyone is a wee bit Irish at St. Patrick’s Day, and the Museums on the Green help to kick off the holiday by giving those in the audience a taste of the Emerald Isle. Students from the Haley School of Irish Dancing will be in Falmouth to demonstrate for the audience various steps, costumes and traditions that go into Irish Step Dancing.  At the end, students will perform routines and teach those who want to learn a variety of dance moves so that they can do it themselves.

April 9: Heritage Award Dinner

On Wednesday, April 9 at 6 pm, at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, the Falmouth Historical Society and the Museums on the Green will host the annual Heritage Award dinner.  This is to recognize individuals or groups who have made a significant and positive impact upon the town of Falmouth and to Cape Cod.

Our 2014 recipients are Elizabeth Heald Arthur and Sally Cross.

This event is sponsored by:

Orchid Level:  C.H. Newton Builders Inc.

Rose Level:  Wood Lumber Company

Rose Level:  M. Duffany Builders

Tulip Level:  Compassionate Care ALS

Tulip Level:  Jim and Caroline Lloyd

Advertiser:  Falmouth Art Center

 

We hope you can join us to honor and celebrate the lives of these two extraordinary ladies.

Menu:  (cash bar)

  • Cheese and crackers
  • House Salad
  • Entrée Choice:
    • Chicken Saltimbocca
    • Pistachio encrusted Salmon
    • Vegetarian Plate
  • Strawberry Shortcake

(Note: $35 of this event is tax-deductible.)

To make a reservation, please click the link below:

 


Heritage Dinner April 9 2014
Dinner Choice



Wed., July 16: Lecture: Michael Connelly, “The President’s Team”

  • Wednesday, July 16: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Michael Connelly discusses his book, “The President’s Team: The 1963 Army-Navy Game and the Assassination of John F. Kennedy”

In 1963, the Navy team, led by Roger Staubach, was set to take on their rivals from Army.  The game was cancelled due to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  However, the Kennedy family asked if the game might be played in JFK’s honor.  This is a story of that team and that season.

Wed., July 9: Lecture: Larry Tye–“Superman”

  • Wednesday, July 9: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Larry Tye discusses his book, “Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Superhero”

Seventy-five years after he came to life, Superman remains one of America’s most adored and enduring heroes.Legions of fans from Boston to Buenos Aires can recite the story of the child born Kal-El, scion of the doomed planet Krypton, who was rocketed to Earth as an infant, raised by humble Kansas farmers, and rechristened Clark Kent. Known to law-abiders and evildoers alike as Superman, he was destined to become the invincible champion of all that is good and just—and a star in every medium from comic books and comic strips to radio, TV, and film.But behind the high-flying legend lies a true-to-life saga every bit as compelling, one that begins not in the far reaches of outer space but in the middle of America’s heartland. From two-fisted crimebuster to über-patriot, social crusader to spiritual savior, Superman—perhaps like no other mythical character before or since—has evolved in a way that offers a Rorschach test of his times and our aspirations. In this deftly realized appreciation, Larry Tye reveals a portrait of America over seventy years through the lens of that otherworldly hero who continues to embody our best selves.

Tuesday, May 13, 7pm: Nathaniel Philbrick: “Bunker Hill”

  • Tuesday, May 13: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses his book “Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution

NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 91 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord.  In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists.
Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control.
With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.

Wed., August 6, 7 pm: World War II History–An Evening with Alex Kershaw

  • Wednesday, August 6: Lecture, 7 pm: “World War II History: An Evening with Alex Kershaw”

Alex Kershaw is the author of the widely acclaimed best sellers The Bedford BoysThe Longest Winter, The Few, Escape from the Deep, and The Envoy, as well as biographies of both Jack London and Robert Capa. His latest book is The Liberator.

Tuesday, May 6, Lecture: Ben Bradlee, Jr., “The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams”

  • Tuesday, May 6: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Ben Bradlee Jr. discusses his book “The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams”

NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 68 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Ted Williams was the best hitter in baseball history. His batting average of .406 in 1941 has not been topped since, and no player who has hit more than 500 home runs has a higher career batting average. Those totals would have been even higher if Williams had not left baseball for nearly five years in the prime of his career to serve as a Marine pilot in WWII and Korea. He hit home runs farther than any player before him–and traveled a long way himself, as Ben Bradlee, Jr.’s grand biography reveals. Born in 1918 in San Diego, Ted would spend most of his life disguising his Mexican heritage. During his 22 years with the Boston Red Sox, Williams electrified crowds across America–and shocked them, too: His notorious clashes with the press and fans threatened his reputation. Yet while he was a God in the batter’s box, he was profoundly human once he stepped away from the plate. His ferocity came to define his troubled domestic life. While baseball might have been straightforward for Ted Williams, life was not.

April 14: Bus Trip to Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

On Monday, April 14th, the Museums on the Green will be taking a bus trip and tour of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.  We will first stop for lunch and then the guided tour will commence at 1:45.  Tickets are $ 55 and include admission to the Museum as well as transportation costs.

THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT!

If you would like to add your name to our waiting list, please email [email protected] with your information.

 

Lecture Saturday March 15: Richard Cahill: “Hauptmann’s Ladder”

  • Saturday, March 15: Lecture, 3 pm: Author Richard Cahill discusses his book “Hauptmann’s Ladder: A Step by Step Analysis of the Lindbergh Kidnapping

 

In 1936, Bruno Richard Hauptmann was executed for the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh Jr. Almost all of America believed Hauptmann guilty; only a few magazines and tabloids published articles questioning his conviction. In the ensuing decades, many books about the Lindbergh case have been published. Some have declared Hauptmann the victim of a police conspiracy and frame-up, and one posited that Lindbergh actually killed his own son and fabricated the entire kidnapping to mask the deed. Because books about the crime have been used as a means to advance personal theories, the truth has often been sacrificed and readers misinformed. Cahill presents conclusions based upon facts and documentary evidence uncovered in his twenty years of research. Using primary sources and painstakingly presenting a chronological reconstruction of the crime and its aftermath, he debunks false claims and explodes outrageous theories, while presenting evidence that has never before been revealed.

Tuesday, November 18: Ken Turino, “The Spirit of Christmas Past”

  • Tuesday, November 18: Lecture, 7 pm: Ken Turino, “The Spirit of Christmas Past: Four Centuries of Christmas in New England

This well illustrated lecture traces the development of the celebration of Christmas from the time it was outlawed in 17th Century New England through the beginning of the 21st Century when all the trappings of a traditional Christmas were in place. For many, the celebration of Christmas today is the most important holiday of the year.  But many of the customs which we take for granted as part of the current holiday festivities and religious celebrations are actually a product of more recent history.

Kenneth C. Turino, Manager of Community Engagement and Exhibitions at Historic New England has published several articles on the history of Christmas and speaks on the topic widely. He will look at how Christmas was transformed from a rowdy celebration to a family centered event. Among the topics discussed are how the Christmas tree became popular, halls were decked, and Santa Claus came to town.

June 25: Christopher Cameron: “To Plead Our Own Cause”

  • Wednesday, June 25: Lecture, 7 pm: Christopher Cameron discusses his book “To Plead Our Own Cause: African Americans in Massachusetts and the Making of the Antislavery Movement”.

The antislavery movement entered an important new phase when William Lloyd Garrison began publishing the Liberator in 1831 a phase marked by massive petition campaigns, the extraordinary mobilization of female activists, and the creation of organizations such as the American Anti-Slavery Society. While the period from 1831 to 1865 is known as the heyday of radical abolitionism, the work of Garrison s predecessors in Massachusetts was critical in laying the foundation for antebellum abolitionism. To Plead Our Own Cause explores the significant contributions of African Americans in the Bay State to both local and nationwide antislavery activity before 1831 and demonstrates that their efforts represent nothing less than the beginning of organized abolitionist activity in America.Fleshing out the important links between Reformed theology, the institution of slavery, and the rise of the antislavery movement, author Christopher Cameron argues that African Americans in Massachusetts initiated organized abolitionism in America and that their antislavery ideology had its origins in Puritan thought and the particular system of slavery that this religious ideology shaped in Massachusetts. The political activity of black abolitionists was central in effecting the abolition of slavery and the slave trade within the BayState, and it was likewise key in building a national antislavery movement in the years of the early republic. Even while abolitionist strategies were evolving, much of the rhetoric and tactics that well-known abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass employed in the mid-nineteenth century had their origins among blacks in Massachusetts during the eighteenth century.

June 5: Thomas Healy: “The Great Dissent”

  • Thursday, June 5: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Thomas Healy discusses his book “The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind—and Changed the History of Free Speech in America”

No right seems more fundamental to American public life than freedom of speech. Yet well into the twentieth century, that freedom was still an unfulfilled promise, with Americans regularly imprisoned merely for speaking out against government policies. Indeed, free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one’s political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States.Why did Holmes change his mind? That question has puzzled historians for almost a century. Now, with the aid of newly discovered letters and confidential memos, law professor Thomas Healy reconstructs in vivid detail Holmes’s journey from free-speech opponent to First Amendment hero. It is the story of a remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign by a group of progressives to bring a legal icon around to their way of thinking—and a deeply touching human narrative of an old man saved from loneliness and despair by a few unlikely young friends.

May 28: Michael McNaught: “Clash of Titans: Grant vs. Lee, Virginia 1864

  • Wednesday, May 28: Lecture, 7 pm: Michael McNaught: “Clash of Titans: Grant vs. Lee, Virginia 1864”
 
 
In May 1864 newly-minted Lieutenant-General Ulysses S. Grant launched what he hoped would be the final campaign of the Army of the Potomac. Designed to destroy Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and end the war by capturing Richmond, what became known as the “Overland Campaign” saw over 40,000 Union casualties over a forty-day period (earning Grant the unwanted sobriquet “Butcher Grant”), with major battles fought in the Wilderness, at Spotsylvania Court House, the North Anna River and Cold Harbor. At the end of the campaign Richmond was still in Confederate hands, and Grant was forced to put Petersburg under siege for the next ten months.

May 21: Janet Uhlar: “Freedom’s Cost: The Story of Gen. Nathanael Greene”

  • Wednesday, May 21: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Janet Uhlar discusses her book “Freedom’s Cost: The Story of General Nathanael Greene”

Nathanael Greene was the strategist of the American Revolution. His role in the War for Independence was second only to General George Washington. Born and reared a Quaker, with no military experience, he was promoted from private to brigadier general overnight. Greene quickly became Washington’s confidant and close friend. He was chosen by the Commander to lead the Continental Army should Washington be killed, injured, or taken captive. It was General Greene who pulled the Continental Army from the throes of death at Valley Forge, who petitioned Congress for a Declaration of Independence, who was given the desperate task of commanding the Southern Department of the Continental Army after other commanders had failed, and who drove British General Cornwallis to surrender at Yorktown. Unable to participate or witness the victorious battle, he was forced to immediately return South with his troops, and subdue the remaining British forces. Greene led his troops in battle and laid siege for a year after the victory at Yorktown. His persistence finally forced the British to evacuate the South.Greene led his men in more battles than any other general officer, including Washington. Moreover, it was Greene who was constantly harassed by Congress, and ultimately forsaken by them. Three years after the official end of the war, Nathanael Greene was dead. His premature death was not only a result of the intense hardships of war, but the hardships and cruelty inflicted on him by the United States Congress.

May 15: Craig Steven Wilder: “Ebony and Ivy”

  • Thursday, May 15: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Craig Steven Wilder discusses his book “Ebony and Ivy: Race and the Troubled History of America’s Universities”

Many of America’s revered colleges and universities—from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and UNC—were soaked in the sweat, the tears, and sometimes the blood of people of color. The earliest academies proclaimed their mission to Christianize the savages of North America, and played a key role in white conquest. Later, the slave economy and higher education grew up together, each nurturing the other. Slavery funded colleges, built campuses, and paid the wages of professors. Enslaved Americans waited on faculty and students; academic leaders aggressively courted the support of slave owners and slave traders. Significantly, our leading universities, dependent on human bondage, became breeding grounds for the racist ideas that sustained them.Ebony and Ivy is a powerful and propulsive study and the first of its kind, revealing a history of oppression behind the institutions usually considered the cradle of liberal politics.

May 1: Stephen Puleo: “The Caning”

  • Thursday, May 1: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Stephen Puleo discusses his book “The Caning: The Assault that Drove America to Civil War”

Early in the afternoon of May 22, 1856, ardent pro-slavery Congressman Preston S. Brooks of South Carolina strode into the United States Senate Chamber in Washington, D.C., and began beating renowned anti-slavery Senator Charles Sumner with a gold-topped walking cane. Brooks struck again and again—more than thirty times across Sumner’s head, face, and shoulders—until his cane splintered into pieces and the helpless Massachusetts senator, having nearly wrenched his desk from its fixed base, lay unconscious and covered in blood. Brooks not only shattered his cane during the beating, but also destroyed any pretense of civility between North and South.
One of the most shocking and provocative events in American history, the caning convinced each side that the gulf between them was unbridgeable and that they could no longer discuss their vast differences of opinion regarding slavery on any reasonable level. While Sumner eventually recovered after a lengthy convalescence, compromise had suffered a mortal blow. Moderate voices were drowned out completely; extremist views accelerated, became intractable, and locked both sides on a tragic collision course.The caning had an enormous impact on the events that followed over the next four years: the meteoric rise of the Republican Party and Abraham Lincoln; the Dred Scott decision; the increasing militancy of abolitionists, notably John Brown’s actions; and the secession of the Southern states and the founding of the Confederacy. As a result of the caning, the country was pushed, inexorably and unstoppably, to war. Many factors conspired to cause the Civil War, but it was the caning that made conflict and disunion unavoidable five years later.

April 16: Samantha Gray: “100 Years of the Cape Cod Canal”

  • Wednesday, April 16: Lecture, 7 pm: U.S. Park Service Ranger Samantha Gray discusses “Constructing an Engineering Marvel: 100 Years of the Cape Cod Canal”

Samantha Gray will give a PowerPoint lecture and presentation on how the Cape Cod Canal was built and how it forever changed the dynamics of coming to and traveling around the region.

April 6: Re-enactment: Jessa Piaia as Isabella Stewart Gardner

  • Sunday, April 6: Re-enactment Performance, 2:30 pm: Jessa Piaia as Isabella Stewart Gardner

Character reenactor Jessa Piaia will present a dramatic portrayal of Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840-1924) in “A Visit with Isabella Stewart Gardner: America’s First Patroness of the Arts”.  The drama is set in 1910, seven years after the opening of Fenway Court, the house-museum which Mrs. Gardner designed and built for her extensive art collection, and willed to the City of Boston upon her demise.  A recognized leader of Boston’s emerging salon scene, Mrs. Gardner, with characteristic verve and candor, relates episodes about her luminous circle of family and friends, relives journeys to exotic lands, and shares other potentially scandalous encounters.  The portrayal runs approximately 50 minutes in length, with an informal Q&A to follow.

Admission: $ 15 per person

 


Ticket Quantity



March 28: George Daughan: “The Shining Sea”

  • Friday, March 28: Lecture, 7 pm: Author George Daughan discusses his book “The Shining Sea: David Porter and the epic voyage of the USS Essex during the War of 1812”

A few months after the outbreak of the War of 1812, Captain David Porter set out in the USS Essex on an epic, seventeen-month cruise to the South Seas. Porter was pursuing fame and riches, and by most accounts his odyssey was a stunning success: it brought glory to the fledgling American navy, cemented Porter’s reputation as a daring and talented commander, and has long been celebrated as one of the greatest maritime adventures in U.S. history. Less well known, however, is the terrible price that the crew of the Essex paid for their captain’s outsized ambitions.In The Shining Sea, award-winning historian George C. Daughan tells the full story of Porter’s thrilling, action-packed voyage, revealing the heights of Porter’s hubris and the true depths of his failure on this fateful cruise. A swashbuckling tale of risk and ruin on the high seas, The Shining Sea brings to life the monomaniacal quest of one of the most misunderstood commanders of the War of 1812. Porter’s singular voyage, Daughan shows, stands as a cautionary tale for any leader who would put personal glory and ambition ahead of cause and countrymen.

March 20: Kevin Symmons: “Out of the Storm”

  • Thursday, March 20: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Kevin Symmons discusses his historical novel, “Out of the Storm”.

War hero Eric Montgomery returns from Iraq, hoping to revive his family’s Cape Cod marina and marry his childhood sweetheart. When his wife and unborn child die in a tragic auto accident Eric’s dreams are shattered. He spends long months grieving, losing himself in alcohol, isolation, and anger. Then Ashley Fitzhugh, a young woman he’s met only once, appears on his doorstep one stormy night. Eric is annoyed at first, but soon finds himself caring for his visitor and her young daughter–seeing in them a chance to rebuild the life he lost. When threatening phone calls, mysterious strangers, and covert agents invade their peaceful lives, Eric must decide: Is Ashley the answer to a prayer? Or part of the nightmare he can never escape?

March 18: Christopher Klein: “Strong Boy: The Life and Times of John L. Sullivan”

  • Tuesday, March 18: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Christopher Klein discusses his book “Strong Boy: The Life and Times of John L. Sullivan, America’s First Sports Hero”

Born in the South End, the “Boston Strong Boy” was the last of the bare-knuckle heavyweight champions, the biggest sporting icon of the 1880s and 1890s, and the first athlete to earn more than a million dollars. He had a big ego, big mouth, and bigger appetites. His womanizing, drunken escapades, and chronic police-blotter presence were godsends to a burgeoning newspaper industry. The larger-than-life boxer embodied the American Dream for late nineteenth-century Irish immigrants as he rose from Boston’s working class to become the most recognizable man in the nation and the friend of kings and presidents.

March 12: Megan Marshall: “Margaret Fuller: A New American Life”

  • Wednesday, March 12: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Megan Marshall discusses her book “Margaret Fuller: A New American Life”

From an early age, Margaret Fuller provoked and dazzled New England’s intellectual elite. Her famous Conversations changed women’s sense of how they could think and live; her editorship of the Transcendentalist literary journal the Dial shaped American Romanticism.

Marshall tells the story of how Fuller, tired of Boston, accepted Horace Greeley’s offer to be the New-York Tribune’s front-page columnist. The move unleashed a crusading concern for the urban poor and the plight of prostitutes, and a late-in-life hunger for passionate experience. In Italy as a foreign correspondent, Fuller took a secret lover, a young officer in the Roman Guard; she wrote dispatches on the brutal 1849 Siege of Rome; and she gave birth to a son.
Yet, when all three died in a shipwreck off Fire Island shortly after Fuller’s fortieth birthday, the sense and passion of her life’s work were eclipsed by tragedy and scandal. Marshall’s inspired account brings an American heroine back to indelible life.

Feb. 20: Lecture: Stephen Kinzer: “The Brothers”

  • Thursday, February 20: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Stephen Kinzer discussing his book, “The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles and their Secret World War”.

During the 1950s, when the Cold War was at its peak, two immensely powerful brothers led the United States into a series of foreign adventures whose effects are still shaking the world.John Foster Dulles was secretary of state while his brother, Allen Dulles, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In this book, Stephen Kinzer places their extraordinary lives against the background of American culture and history. He uses the framework of biography to ask: Why does the United States behave as it does in the world? The Brothers explores hidden forces that shape the national psyche, from religious piety to Western movies—many of which are about a noble gunman who cleans up a lawless town by killing bad guys. This is how the Dulles brothers saw themselves, and how many Americans still see their country’s role in the world. Propelled by a quintessentially American set of fears and delusions, the Dulles brothers launched violent campaigns against foreign leaders they saw as threats to the United States. These campaigns helped push countries from Guatemala to the Congo into long spirals of violence, led the United States into the Vietnam War, and laid the foundation for decades of hostility between the United States and countries from Cuba to Iran.

Wed., Feb 12th: Lecture: Alma Katsu–“Researching the Historical Novel”

  • Wednesday, February 12: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Alma Katsu: “Researching the Historical Novel”

 Join Alma Katsu, author of The Taker Trilogy, as she discusses the challenges of conducting research for fiction that spans multiple eras and continents. The Taker, Ms. Katsu’s first book, was selected by BOOKLIST as one of the ten best debut novels of 2011 and has been published in over a dozen languages. The final book in the trilogy, The Descent, was released in January. Ms. Katsu holds a MA in fiction from JohnsHopkinsUniversity, and is currently a senior analyst and researcher for a major think tank.

“Hullabaloo and the Nimrod, Too!” January 28, 2014

You are cordially invited to a commemoration of the bombardment of Falmouth on its 200th anniversary—January 28, 2014—hosted by the Falmouth Museums on the Green. This bicentennial marks the dark day in January when the HMS Nimrod attempted to destroy the town. Despite the shelling, the inhabitants withstood the marauding efforts of the British to force Falmouth residents to pay ransom or surrender their two brass cannons. We will commemorate this with a much more festive event than the original!

Hullabaloo and the Nimrod, Too!” will be held at the Coonamessett Inn, 311 Gifford Street, Falmouth, beginning at 6:00 pm. Entertainment will include fifes and drums as well as the “Rum Soaked Crooks”, a men’s singing quartet.  There will likely be other surprises as well.

.Dress: Celebration casual or period costume for fun and special prizes.

To purchase tickets:

 


Hullabaloo and the Nimrod, Too!



November 9: Military History Symposium

New England Military History Symposium, November 9, 2013:

A Variety of Topics on New England and American Military History, Honoring Those Who Served

Admission Begins 9:00 am

Admission: $ 15 for non-members

                     $ 10 for Falmouth Historical Society members and veterans

                     Active Military: FREE

                     Reservations Not Required

 SCHEDULE

9:00-9:30: Admission

 Speakers:

  • 9:30 am: Nina Zannieri, Paul Revere Memorial Association: The Grandsons of Paul Revere who fought and died in the Civil War
  • 10:15 am: Thomas Nester, Bridgewater State University: Butler and Banks: Massachusetts’ Notorious Political Generals in the Civil War”
  • 11:00 am: Anne Marie Reardon: Italian  WWII POW’s on Peddocks Island, Boston Harbor
  • 11:45: James F. Murphy: Korean War veteran, reading from “Chicken Soup for the Veteran’s Soul”” Freedom Village
  • 12:15-1:30: LUNCH BREAK (This is on your own and NOT part of the admission)
  • 1:30 pm: John Galluzzo: The History of Camp Edwards
  • 2:15 pm: Captain Connie Frizzell, Naval War College: “The Historical Uses of Cryptology”
  • 3:00: Michael Connelly, “The President’s Team: The 1963 Army-Navy Game and the JFK Assassination”

November 6: William Fowler discusses the French & Indian War

  • Wednesday, November 6th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: William Fowler, author of “Empires at War: The French and Indian War”, commemorating the 250th anniversary of the end of the war

On May 28, 1754, a group of militia and Indians led by twenty-two-year-old major George Washington surprised a camp of sleeping French soldiers near present-day Pittsburgh. Washington could not have known it, but the brief and deadly exchange of fire that ensued lit the match that, in Horace Walpole’s memorable phrase, would “set the world on fire.” The resultung French and Indian War in North America became part of the global conflict known as the Seven Years War, fought across Europe, India, and the East and West Indies. Before it ended, nearly one million men had died.
Empires at War captures the sweeping panorama of this first world war, especially in its descriptions of the strategy and intensity of the engagements in North America, many of them epic struggles between armies in the wilderness.

A Colonial Christmas

The Museums on the Green, along with the Falmouth Garden Club, will present “A Colonial Christmas” from Saturday, December 6th to Sunday, December 14.

The 1790 Dr. Francis Wicks House will be decorated and complimentary tours of the venue will be held each day from 10 am to 2 pm.

Additionally, the house will be open from 5 pm to 8 pm on December 7th in conjunction with the Falmouth Town Green Tree Lighting.

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“Preserving the Bounty” Workshop October 16

Preserving the Bounty

Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 10am-12pm

Education Center

$15 per person

Join the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension’s Buy Fresh Buy Local for this workshop to learn the basics of the simplest forms of food preservation by drying locally-grown herbs and safely preparing herb vinegars. The holidays are coming and it’s a perfect time to share the local bounty from Cape Cod with family and friends. Be prepared to roll up your sleeves to work in the museum kitchen and leave with your own herbal salt blend and bottle of herb vinegar. Reservations required. Attendance limited to 20 participants. Call 508-548-4857 or email [email protected] to make a reservation. This event is cosponsored by the Falmouth Museums on the Green and the Falmouth Farmers’ Market.

Bob Halloran, “Impact Statement”, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 7 pm

Wednesday, October 23rd, 7:00 pm

Author Bob Halloran discusses his new book, “Impact Statement: A Family’s Fight for Justice against Whitey Bulger, Stephen Flemmi and the FBI”.

 

No one can deny that mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger and Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi are two of the most brutal killers in American history—not even the two gangsters themselves. However, of the various murders for which Bulger has been convicted, the jury has denied the Davis family closure for the slaying of Debbie Davis, Flemmi’s beautiful young girlfriend who went missing in 1981, and whose remains were found nearly twenty years later under the Neponset River Bridge in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Now serving a life sentence, Stephen Flemmi testified in 2003 in graphic detail how he lured Debbie to a house in South Boston where Bulger jumped from out of the shadows and strangled her to death. Flemmi then extracted her teeth and buried her body by the Neponset River while Bulger watched. Bulger wanted Debbie dead, Flemmi claimed, because she knew that the two men were meeting with an FBI agent named John Connolly. That, and he might have been a little jealous of the time Flemmi and Debbie were spending together. Throughout his trial, Bulger stubbornly insisted that he never would have committed the dishonorable act of killing a woman. In the end, it was one stone-cold murderer’s testimony against another’s.

In Impact Statement, veteran journalist Bob Halloran of WCVB, Channel 5 in Boston, looks at the devastating impact Bulger and Flemmi have had on the Davis family, whose longstanding relationship with the two mobsters cost them a father, two sisters, and a brother. Through up-to-the-minute coverage of Bulger’s criminal trial and extensive interviews with Debbie’s brother Steve Davis, a one-time protégé of Flemmi’s and now an outspoken advocate for the victims’ families, Halloran has pieced together this unique and compelling story of a family’s ongoing quest for justice.

Anthony Sammarco, “The History of Howard Johnson’s”, Saturday, Oct. 19, 3 pm

Saturday, October 19th, 3 pm:

Author Anthony Sammarco discusses his new best seller, “The History of Howard Johnson’s: How a Massachusetts Soda Fountain Became an American Icon”.

 

Howard Johnson created an orange-roofed empire of ice cream stands and restaurants that stretched from Maine to Florida and all the way to the West Coast. Popularly known as the “Father of the Franchise Industry,” Johnson delivered good food and prices that brought appreciative customers back for more. The attractive white Colonial Revival restaurants, with eye-catching porcelain tile roofs, illuminated cupolas and sea blue shutters, were described in Reader’s Digest in 1949 as the epitome of “eating places that look like New England town meeting houses dressed up for Sunday.” Boston historian and author Anthony M. Sammarco recounts how Howard Johnson introduced twenty-eight flavors of ice cream, the “Tendersweet” clam strips, grilled frankforts and a menu of delicious and traditional foods that families eagerly enjoyed when they traveled.

Noted Boston historian Anthony Sammarco, himself an author of over 60 books, will be in Falmouth to talk about the empire created by Howard Johnson and what it meant to Americans.

Stephen Brumwell lecture: “George Washington: Gentleman Warrior”, Oct. 17, 11 am

Thursday, October 17th, 11 am:

Author Stephen Brumwell discusses his latest book, “George Washington: Gentleman Warrior”.

 

Award-winning British author and historian Stephen Brumwell comes to Falmouth to discuss his research on the man who was voted “Britain’s Greatest Foe”. Brumwell’s book has won the prestigious George Washington Book Award for 2013. In it, he shows a sometimes overlooked side of Washington—the feisty young frontier officer and the tough commander of the ragtag revolutionary Continental army.  Washington ironically also relied upon English models of ‘gentlemanly’ behavior and British military organization to forge an army and to establish his leadership of it. Brumwell paints a fresh picture of a man who fused this gentlemanly behavior and warrior leader to ultimately lead his army to victory.

September 18: John Galluzzo, “Half an Hour a Day Across Massachusetts”

  • Wednesday, September 18th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: John Galluzzo, author of “Half an Hour a Day Across Massachusetts”

In 2009, Massachusetts naturalist and historian John J. Galluzzo set out to take a half an hour walk every single day in a different place, no matter what the weather was like, no matter what state his health was in. In 2011, he took things 351 steps further. Staring down classic New England snowstorms he set out in January on a new project, determined to walk for a half an hour in every town and city in Massachusetts on protected open space. He stormed the beaches of Cape Cod with the same ferocity with which he scaled the mountains of BerkshireCounty. Through rain, heat, mud and mosquitoes, he checked off towns and counties as he took note of wildlife sightings, all the while wearing his way through numerous pairs of shoes. Along the way, personal tragedy struck, within sight of his goal. The debate raged in his head – continue to the end, or drop the project to start again another year? Join John as he marches his way through the BayState, proving once and for all that a nature trail, or at least a nature experience, is never that far away for residents of Massachusetts.

August 14: John Ross, “Shakespeare’s Tremor and Orwell’s Cough”

  • Wednesday, August 14th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: John Ross, author of “Shakespeare’s Tremor and Orwell’s Cough: The Medical Lives of Famous Writers”

Part of the Dr. Francis Wicks lecture series involving medical history. John Ross cheerfully debunks old biographical myths and suggests fresh diagnoses for these writers’ real-life medical mysteries. The author takes us way back, when leeches were used for bleeding and cupping was a common method of cure, to a time before vaccinations, sterilized scalpels, or real drug regimens. With a healthy dose of gross descriptions and a deep love for the literary output of these ten greats, Ross is the doctor these writers should have had in their time of need.

August 11th: “Broadway Celebrates the Seas” with Stephanie Miele

  • Sunday, August 11th, 3:00 pm: Special Concert with Stephanie Miele: “Broadway Celebrates the Seas”

Presented by vocalist Stephanie Miele, pianist Alice Carey, and bassist John Wall.

 Many musical theater pieces have been inspired by the ocean, the thrill of traveling to unfamiliar places, and the joy of returning home.  Please join us as we perform songs written by Rodgers and Hammerstein,Leonard Bernstein, Kander and Ebb,  Stephen Schwartz, and others who have explored these ideas.

August 8: Lecture: Cameron Stracher, author of “Kings of the Road”

Thursday, August 8, 7:00 pm.

  • Lecture: Cameron Stracher, author of “Kings of the Road: How Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers and Alberto Salazar made Running go Boom!”

Running is so popular in America that it’s easy to assume it always has been. It hasn’t. In the 1970s and 1980s, three men transformed running from a sleepy sport. Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers and Alberto Salazar inspired millions of Americans to become runners themselves. Cameron Stracher gives us unparalleled access to these men’s lives and a unique lens onto two decades of financial and political turmoil. While the country floundered, Americans found solace in their new sport.

                    For years running was too repetitive to attract many spectators. When TV sets found their ways into most American homes, people watched baseball. Then, in quick succession, came three fantastic athletes. Each one bested the race track in their own way. Med school dropout Frank Shorter’s dramatic Olympic victory in the marathon was the first for an American in 64 years. 22-year-old Alberto Salazar broke the nation’s record in the first marathon he ever ran. Salazar pushed himself so hard in one race that he suffered heat stroke and a body temperature of 108 degrees, only to finish after Bill Rodgers.

August 7: Arthur Richmond, “The Evolution of the Cape Cod House”

  • Wednesday, August 7th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Arthur Richmond, author of “The Evolution of the Cape Cod House

The Cape Cod house has seen many different and popular architectural styles from its beginnings more than six centuries ago to the present. The story starts in rural England where yeomen and tradesmen built their small one to one-and-a-half story timber framed cottages. The first settlers that came to the New World and settled in Massachusetts built comparable cottages in the 1620s. After explaining the three basic variations half cape, three quarter cape, and full cape, Richmond examines more than 100 historic houses spread throughout southeastern Massachusetts and Cape Cod. A must for anyone interested in architecture, Cape Cod, and the most admired of American homes.

August 5: Michael Burgess: The 1980 Lake Placid Winter Olympics

  • Monday, August 5th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Michael Burgess, author of “A Long Shot to Glory: How Lake Placid Saved the Winter Olympics and Restored the Nation’s Pride”

Sometimes life is like a movie. There are moments and events in life – not often – that are as exciting and as dramatic as a movie. What happened in Lake Placid, New York in February 1980 at the Thirteenth Winter Olympics was such a time. For those who experienced it in person or watched the games on television, they remember where they were when the US hockey team beat the Soviet Union and then beat the team from Finland two days later to win the gold medal. The sports victory of an underdog group of college kids was thrilling enough but it was a win against the Soviet Union. This Cold War adversary was also the nation hosting the summer games later that year which the United States was threatening to boycott.
What happened on the hockey ice was improbable enough, but the Lake Placid Winter Games were a long shot, if not a miracle too. Winning the games had been an unlikely decades-long quest for this small town to overcome the barriers of exploding finances, environmental concerns and world politics. Few remember that the 1980 games were never supposed to take place in Lake Placid. They came to the small village because of unexpected events which unfolded and made the two weeks in the remote Adirondacks before a worldwide audience of nearly a billion viewers one of the most dramatic times in the modern era of sports, media and politics. It would not be too much of a stretch to say that the Lake Placid Games, which brought the “Miracle on Ice,” saved the Winter Olympics in 1980 and greatly enhanced them for the future.

July 30: Harm de Blij, “Why Geography Matters”

  • Tuesday, July 30th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Harm de Blij, author of “Why Geography Matters

In recent years our world has seen transformations of all kinds: intense climate change accompanied by significant weather extremes; deadly tsunamis caused by submarine earthquakes; unprecedented terrorist attacks; costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan; a terrible and overlooked conflict in Equatorial Africa costing millions of lives; an economic crisis threatening the stability of the international system. Is there some way we can get our minds around these disparate global upheavals, to grasp these events and their interconnections, and place our turbulent world in a more understandable light? Acclaimed author Harm de Blij answers this question with one word: geography. He also argues that the US has become geographically illiterate, and that this trend must change.

 

July 21st: Twilight in the Garden: Cocktails, Tapas & Music

The party of the summer will be on Sunday, July 21st from 5:30 to 8:00 pm.

Come enjoy the food, the music, the ambience of the Museum’s gardens; take part in our raffles; and spend some time luxuriating in the splendor of the season!  This event is always popular and sells out quickly!

Get your tickets here:

 


Twilight in the Garden: Cocktails, Tapas & Musis



July 17: Special Event: A Night with Evan Thomas

  • Wednesday, July 17th, 7:00 pm: Special Event: A Night with Evan Thomas, author of “Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle to Save the World

Upon assuming the presidency in 1953, Dwight Eisenhower came to be seen by many as a doddering lightweight. Yet behind the bland smile and apparent simplemindedness was a brilliant, intellectual tactician. As Evan Thomas reveals in his provocative examination of Ike’s White House years, Eisenhower was a master of calculated duplicity. As with his bridge and poker games he was eventually forced to stop playing after leaving too many fellow army officers insolvent, Ike could be patient and ruthless in the con, and generous and expedient in his partnerships. Facing the Soviet Union, China, and his own generals, some of whom believed a first strike was the only means of survival, Eisenhower would make his boldest and riskiest bet yet, one of such enormity that there could be but two outcomes: the survival of the world, or its end.
This is the story of how he won.

July 10: Tom Reiss, “The Black Count”

  • Wednesday, July 10th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Tom Reiss, author of “The Black Count: Revolution, Betrayal and the real Count of Monte Cristo”

NOTE: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED FOR 2013 DUE TO A SCHEDULING CONFLICT. IT WILL BE RESCHEDULED FOR 2014

Generations have been enthralled by Alexandre Dumas’ characters, especially the wronged hero in The Count of Monte Cristo and the daring swordsmen in The Three Musketeers. Yet few realize that these memorable characters were inspired by Dumas’ father, General Alex Dumas, the son of a French count and a black Haitian slave. Tom Reiss brings the elder Dumas alive with previously unpublished correspondence and meticulous research, providing the context necessary to understand how exceptional his life as a mulatto general in a slave-owning empire truly was. From single-handedly holding a bridge in the Alps against 20 enemies to spending years held captive in a fortress, Alex Dumas is a fascinating character that not even his son’s vivid imagination could have dreamed up, and how a jealous Napoleon ruined his reputation.

June 27th: Stephanie Schorow, author of “Drinking Boston”

  • Thursday, June 27th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Stephanie Schorow, author of “Drinking Boston: A History of the City and its Spirits”

From the revolutionary camaraderie of the Colonial taverns to the saloons of the turn of the century; from Prohibition—a period rife with class politics, social reform, and opportunism—to a trail of nightclub neon so vast, it was called the “Conga Belt”, Drinking Boston is a tribute to the fascinating role alcohol has played throughout the city s history. Teasing out this curious relationship—in particular, the clash between a constrained Puritanism (lingering like a hangover today) and a raucous revolutionary spirit—Drinking Boston introduces the cast of characters who championed or vilified drinking and the places where they imbibed—legally and otherwise. Visiting some of Boston s most storied neighborhood bars, this pub crawl ends with Boston s distinct recipe for the current cocktail renaissance sweeping the nation. Stephanie Schorow serves up a remarkable cocktail representative of Boston s intoxicating story: its spirit of invention, its hardscrabble politics, its mythology, and the city s never-ending battle between personal freedom and civic reform.

June 26: Thomas Craughwell, “Thomas Jefferson’s Creme Brulee”

  • Wednesday, June 26th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Thomas Craughwell, author of “Thomas Jefferson’s Crème Brulee: How a Founding Father and his slave introduced French cuisine to America”

This culinary biography recounts the 1784 deal that Thomas Jefferson struck with his slaves, James Hemings. The founding father was traveling to Paris and wanted to bring James along “for a particular purpose”— to master the art of French cooking. In exchange for James’s cooperation, Jefferson would grant his freedom. 

Thus began one of the strangest partnerships in United States history. As Hemings apprenticed under master French chefs, Jefferson studied the cultivation of French crops (especially grapes for winemaking) so that they might be replicated in American agriculture. The two men returned home with such marvels as pasta, French fries, Champagne, macaroni and cheese, crème brûlée, and a host of other treats. This narrative history tells the story of their remarkable adventure—and even includes a few of their favorite recipes!

June 20th: Casey Sherman, author of “Animal”

Thursday, June 20th, 7:00 pm

  • Lecture: Casey Sherman, author of “Animal: The Bloody Rise and Fall of the Mob’s Most Feared Assassin”

Joe Barboza knew that there were two requirements for getting inducted into the Mafia. You had to be Sicilian. And you had to commit a contract killing. The New Bedford-born mobster was a proud Portuguese, not Sicilian, but his dream to be part of La Cosa Nostra proved so strong that he thought he could create a loophole. If he killed enough men, if he did enough of the Mafia’s dirtiest biddings, then they would have no choice but to make him a Made Man. Barboza’s brutal rise during one of the deadliest mob wars in U.S. history became the stuff of legend, both on the bloodied streets of Boston and in the offices of the FBI and the U.S. Attorney General. He took sick joy in his crimes, and it became increasingly difficult for the mob to keep the Animal on his leash. But soon the hunter became the hunted. Betrayed by the mob and now on the run, Boston’s most notorious contract killer forged a Faustian bargain with two unscrupulous FBI agents–a pact that would transform the U.S. criminal justice system. From false testimony and manipulated evidence that sent mob leaders to death row, to the creation of the Witness Protection Program so the feds could protect their prized, cold-blooded witness, this was the horrific, dramatic first act in a story of murder and FBI corruption still being played out today in the news and the courtroom with the capture and trial of Whitey Bulger. Barboza’s legacy, buried for years thanks to the murders or deaths of its participants, is finally coming to light and being told in its unvarnished brutality by one of America’s most respected true crime writers.

June 12: Arlene Kay, “Die Laughing: A Cape Cod Mystery”

  • Wednesday, June 12th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Arlene Kay, author of “Die Laughing: A Cape Cod Mystery”

When a vicious murder shatters the peaceful Cape Cod town of Goodhaven, graduate student Nicole Nelson vows to find the culprit. She’s pitted against a cast of quirky local characters with buried secrets and motives aplenty. Did the victim know too much, or did someone covet her fabulous collection of high-end comics? Nicole joins forces with a snobbish lawyer and a gorgeous stranger to avenge her friend and find the murderer.

Free Movie Mondays

 

Free Movie Mondays!

 Experience what was going on during the 1940’s when, in conjunction with our “There’s a War On! The Falmouth Home Front, 1940-1945” exhibit, we will be showing movies that were playing in the theaters during that era. 

And, the admission is free!

Here is what is on tap: 

  • June 24—“Casablanca” (Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, 1942)
  • July 8—“Yankee Doodle Dandy (James Cagney, 1942)
  • July 15—“Arsenic and Old Lace” (Cary Grant, 1944)
  • July 22—“Meet Me in St. Louis” (Judy Garland, 1944)
  • July 29—“Sergeant York” (Gary Cooper, 1941)

June 3rd: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season”

Monday, June 3rd, 7:00 pm.

  • Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball’s Golden Age”

In 1945 Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself. Parks were half empty, the balls were made with fake rubber, and mediocre replacements roamed the fields, as hundreds of players, including the game’s biggest stars, were serving abroad, devoted to unconditional Allied victory in World War II.But by the spring of 1946, the country was ready to heal. The war was finally over, and as America’s fathers and brothers were coming home, so too were the sport’s greats. Ted Williams, Stan Musial, and Joe DiMaggio returned with bats blazing, making the season a true classic that ended in a thrilling seven-game World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals. America also witnessed the beginning of a new era in baseball-it was a year of attendance records, the first year Yankee Stadium held night games, the last year the Green Monster wasn’t green, and, most significant, Jackie Robinson’s first year playing in the Brooklyn Dodgers’ system.
The Victory Season brings to vivid life these years of baseball and war, including the little known “World Series” that servicemen played in a captured Hitler Youth stadium in the fall of 1945. Robert Weintraub’s extensive research and vibrant storytelling enliven the legendary season that embodies what we now think of as the game’s golden era.

May 30: Mark Schmidt, “The Man Who Never Was: WW2’s Boldest Intelligence Operation”

  • Thursday, May 30th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Mark Schmidt, “The Man Who Never Was: World War II’s Boldest Counter-Intelligence Operation”

As plans got under way for the Allied invasion of Sicily in June 1943, British counter-intelligence agent Ewen Montagu masterminded a scheme to mislead the Germans into thinking the next landing would occur in Greece. The innovative plot was so successful that the Germans moved some of their forces away from Sicily, and two weeks into the real invasion still expected an attack in Greece. This extraordinary operation called for a dead body, dressed as a Royal Marine officer and carrying false information about a pending Allied invasion of Greece, to wash up on a Spanish shore near the town of a known Nazi agent.  Failure could have had devastating results. Success, however, brought a decided change in the course of the war.

May 15: “Crime Time: How to Write a Mystery!” with Sandra Lee, Michele McPhee and Kyle Darcy

  • Wednesday, May 15th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: “Crime Time: How to Write about a Mystery!”  with Sandra Lee, author of “The Shanty”, along with Michele McPhee, author of “A Mob Story” and Kyle Darcy, author of “Under Current Conditions”

Two popular female authors—one involving fiction, one in non-fiction—, as well as a novelist whose work is based on fact–come to Falmouth to team up to discuss their works and what goes into successfully writing about mysteries.

May 8: Lecture: Michael Tougias, author of “A Storm Too Soon”

  • Wednesday, May 8th, 7:00 pm: Lecture:  Michael Tougias, author of “A Storm Too Soon: A True Story of Survival and a Remarkable Rescue

In honor of Maritime History Month, the Society presents the true tale of an amazing 2007 Coast Guard rescue in the Atlantic, and how those rescued, as well as the rescuers themselves, battled the elements to simply not allow lives to perish. This is the tale of the one of the largest and most intense rescues in Coast Guard history.

May 2: Jefferson Morley, “Snow Storm in August”

  • Thursday, May 2nd, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Jefferson Morley, author of “Snow Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key, and the forgotten Race Riot of 1835”

In 1835, the city of Washington pulsed with change. As newly freed African Americans from the South poured in, free blacks outnumbered slaves for the first time. Radical notions of abolishing slavery circulated on the city’s streets, and white residents were forced to confront new ideas of what the nation’s future might look like.
On the night of August 4th, Arthur Bowen, an eighteen-year-old slave, stumbled into the bedroom where his owner, Anna Thornton, slept. He had an ax in the crook of his arm. An alarm was raised, and he ran away. Word of the incident spread rapidly, and within days, Washington’s first race riot exploded, as whites fearing a slave rebellion attacked the property of the free blacks. Residents dubbed the event the “Snow-Storm,” in reference to the central role of Beverly Snow, a flamboyant former slave turned successful restaurateur, who became the target of the mob’s rage.In the wake of the riot came two sensational criminal trials that gripped the city. Prosecuting both cases was none other than Francis Scott Key, a politically ambitious attorney famous for writing the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner,” who few now remember served as the city’s district attorney for eight years. Key defended slavery until the twilight’s last gleaming, and pandered to racial fears by seeking capital punishment for Arthur Bowen. But in a surprise twist his prosecution was thwarted by Arthur’s ostensible victim, Anna Thornton, a respected socialite who sought the help of President Andrew Jackson.
Ranging beyond the familiar confines of the White House and the Capitol, Snow-Storm in August delivers readers into an unknown chapter of American history with a textured and absorbing account of the racial secrets and contradictions that coursed beneath the freewheeling capital of a rising world power.

April 17: Walter Stahr, “Seward: Lincoln’s Indispensable Man”

  • Wednesday, April 17th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Walter Stahr, author of “Seward: Lincoln’s Indispensable Man”

William Henry Seward was one of the most important Americans of the nineteenth century. Progressive governor of New York and outspoken U.S. senator, he was the odds-on favorite to win the 1860 Republican nomination for president. As secretary of state and Lincoln’s closest adviser during the Civil War, Seward not only managed foreign affairs but had a substantial role in military, political, and personnel matters. Some of Lincoln’s critics even saw Seward, erroneously, as the power behind the throne; this is why John Wilkes Booth and his colleagues attempted to kill Seward as well as Lincoln. Seward survived the assassin’s attack, continued as secretary of state, and emerged as a staunch supporter of President Andrew Johnson, Lincoln’s controversial successor. Through his purchase of Alaska (“Seward’s Folly”), and his groundwork for the purchase of the Canal Zone and other territory, Seward set America on course to become a world empire.

April 16: Nancy Rubin Stuart, “Defiant Brides”

  • Tuesday, April 16th, 7:oo pm: Lecture: Nancy Rubin Stuart, author of “Defiant Brides: The True Life Account of the Wives of Benedict Arnold and Gen. Henry Knox”

When Peggy Shippen, the celebrated blonde belle of Philadelphia, married American military hero Benedict Arnold in 1779, she anticipated a life of fame and fortune, but financial debts and political intrigues prompted her to conspire with her treasonous husband against George Washington and the American Revolution. In spite of her commendable efforts to rehabilitate her husband’s name, Peggy Shippen continues to be remembered as a traitor bride.
Peggy’s patriotic counterpart was Lucy Flucker, the spirited and voluptuous brunette, who in 1774 defied her wealthy Tory parents by marrying a poor Boston bookbinder simply for love. When her husband, Henry Knox, later became a famous general in the American Revolutionary War, Lucy faithfully followed him through Washington’s army camps where she birthed and lost babies, befriended Martha Washington, was praised for her social skills, and secured her legacy as an admired patriot wife.
And yet, a closer look at the lives of both spirited women reveals that neither was simply a “traitor” or “patriot.” In Defiant Brides, the first dual biography of both Peggy Shippen Arnold and Lucy Flucker Knox,Stuart has crafted a rich portrait of two rebellious women who defied expectations and struggled—publicly and privately—in a volatile political moment in early America.

April 10: James T. Patterson, “The Eve of Destruction”

  • Wednesday, April 10th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: James T. Patterson, author of “The Eve of Destruction: How 1965 Transformed America”

Although the United States was deeply impacted by the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963, it still seemed on the doorstep of a golden age.  However, by the end of 1965, events had occurred that caused the US to go down a different path.  Historian James Patterson examines how the tumultuous year 1965 created “the Sixties” as we knew them.

 

March 6: Eric Jay Dolin, “When America First Met China”

  • Wednesday, March 6th, 7:00 pm:  Lecture: Eric Jay Dolin, author of “When America First Met China: An Exotic History of Tea, Drugs and Money in the Age of Sail”

An episode in maritime history that few have explored, Eric Jay Dolin discusses how a young, brash naval power encounters an ancient empire in a story of opium smugglers, sea pirates and dueling clipper ships.

February 6th, Stacy Cordery: The Life of Juliette Gordon Low

  • Wednesday, February 6th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Stacy Cordery, author of “Juliette Gordon Low: The Remarkable Founder of the Girl Scouts

To honor the centennial of the founding of the Girl Scouts, author Stacy Cordery will discuss her new book about the energetic and charismatic Juliette Gordon Low, who was unhappy with her life of privilege and sought to create an enterprise that would be fulfilling for young ladies.