Annual Meeting: Saturday, January 16, 10 am

The Falmouth Historical Society and the Museums on the Green will be holding their Annual Members Meeting on Saturday, January 16th, beginning at 10:0 am, in the Museum’s Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth. Members of the Historical Society will be discussing the business of the Society, voting on the 2016 slate of Governors, and will get a preview of what is forthcoming for the 2016 visitation season while also learning about the restoration efforts for the circa 1730 Conant House.

Wednesday, February 17, 7 pm: William Doyle, “PT 109: An American Epic of War, Survival and the Destiny of John F. Kennedy”

In the early morning darkness of August 2, 1943, during a chaotic nighttime skirmish amid the Solomon Islands, the Japanese destroyer Amagiri barreled through thick fog and struck the U.S. Navy’s motor torpedo boat PT 109, splitting the craft nearly in half and killing two American sailors instantly. The sea erupted in flames as the 109’s skipper, John F. Kennedy, and the ten surviving crewmen under his command desperately clung to the sinking wreckage; 1,200 feet of ink-black, shark-infested water loomed beneath. “All hands lost,” came the reports back to the Americans’ base: no rescue was coming for the men of PT 109. Their desperate ordeal was just beginning—so too was one of the most remarkable tales of World War II, one whose astonishing afterlife would culminate two decades later in the White House.

Drawing on original interviews with the last living links to the events, previously untapped Japanese wartime archives, and a wealth of archival documents from the Kennedy Library, including a lost first-hand account by JFK himself, bestselling author William Doyle has crafted a thrilling and definitive account of the sinking of PT 109 and its shipwrecked crew’s heroics. Equally fascinating is the story’s second act, in which Doyle explores in new detail how this extraordinary episode shaped Kennedy’s character and fate, proving instrumental to achieving his presidential ambitions: “Without PT 109, there never would have been a President John F. Kennedy,” declared JFK aide David Powers.

Thursday, March 10, 7 pm: Bob Halloran, “White Devil: The True Story of the First White Asian Crime Boss”

In August 2013, “Bac Guai” John Willis, also known as the “White Devil” because of his notorious ferocity, was sentenced to 20 years for drug trafficking and money laundering. Willis, according to prosecutors, was “the kingpin, organizer and leader of a vast conspiracy,” all within the legendarily insular and vicious Chinese mafia.
It started when John Willis was 16 years old . . . his life seemed hopeless. His father had abandoned his family years earlier, his older brother had just died of a heart attack, and his mother was dying. John was alone, sleeping on the floor of his deceased brother’s home. Desperate, John reached out to Woping, a young Chinese man Willis had rescued from a bar fight weeks before. Woping literally picks him up off the street, taking him home to live among his own brothers and sisters. Soon, Willis is accompanying Woping to meet his Chinese mobster friends, and starts working for them.

Journalist Bob Halloran tells the tale of John Willis, aka White Devil, the only white man to ever rise through the ranks in the Chinese mafia. Willis began as an enforcer, riding around with other gang members to “encourage” people to pay their debts. He soon graduated to even more dangerous work as a full-fledged gang member, barely escaping with his life on several occasions. Told to Halloran from Willis’s prison cell, White Devil is a shocking portrait of a man who was allowed access into a secret world, and who is paying the price for his hardened life. As a white man navigating an otherwise exclusively Asian world, Willis was at first an interesting anomaly, but his ruthless devotion to his adopted culture eventually led to him emerging as a leader. He organized his own gang of co-conspirators and began an extremely lucrative criminal venture selling tens of thousands of oxycodone pills. A year-long FBI investigation brought him down, and John pleaded guilty to save the love of his life from prosecution. He has no regrets. White Devil explores the workings of the Chinese mafia, and he speaks frankly about his relationships with other gang members, the crimes he committed, and why he’ll never rat out any of his brothers to the cops.

Saturday, March 12, 1 pm: Girl Scout Birthday Celebration: Short film screening and presentation by Alecia Orsini

Join us as we celebrate the 104th birthday of the Girl Scouts with a short film presentation and talk by Alecia Orsini. Alecia will narrate the 1918 silent film “The Golden Eaglet,” which explores the history of the organization. She will also discuss the exciting renaissance that’s happening in girl scouting in Falmouth.

Alecia Orsini has been girl scouting for 27 years. A lifetime member of GSUSA, she started as a Daisy, became a leader, and ran scouting for her home town. She also spent seven years as an educator and guide at the Juliette Low Birthplace in Savannah. Alecia will share insights into “the original J Low,” the spirited woman whose belief in the potential of every young girl ultimately changed the world when she founded the Girl Scouts in 1912.

This family-friendly event will be held in the Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, and refreshments will be provided. Admission is free but donations to the Falmouth Girl Scout program will be accepted and cookies will be available for purchase!1924 Girl Scout troop on library steps

Saturday, March 19, 2 pm: Colin Woodard, “American Character: The Epic Struggle between Individual Liberty and the Common Good”

The struggle between individual rights and the good of the community as a whole has been the basis of nearly every major disagreement in our history, from the debates at the Constitutional Convention and in the run up to the Civil War to the fights surrounding the agendas of the Federalists, the Progressives, the New Dealers, the civil rights movement, and the Tea Party. In American Character, Colin Woodard traces these two key strands in American politics through the four centuries of the nation’s existence, from the first colonies through the Gilded Age, Great Depression and the present day, and he explores how different regions of the country have successfully or disastrously accommodated them. The independent streak found its most pernicious form in the antebellum South but was balanced in the Gilded Age by communitarian reform efforts; the New Deal was an example of a successful coalition between communitarian-minded Eastern elites and Southerners.

Woodard argues that maintaining a liberal democracy, a society where mass human freedom is possible, requires finding a balance between protecting  individual liberty and nurturing a free society. Going to either libertarian or collectivist extremes results in tyranny. But where does the “sweet spot” lie in the United States, a federation of disparate regional cultures that have always strongly disagreed on these issues?

Heritage Award Sponsors

The 2016 Heritage Award Dinner, held on April 13, 2016, is made possible in part to the efforts of our most gracious sponsors:

PRESENTING SPONSOR: CAPE COD FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANKCC5_Oval_302_FDIC_Tag

 

 

 

 

 

ADMIRAL LEVEL SPONSOR: M. DUFFANY BUILDERSDuffany logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAPTAIN LEVEL SPONSOR: WOOD LUMBER COMPANYWood Lumber Company logo

 

 

 

 

LIEUTENANT LEVEL SPONSOR: ISLAND QUEEN FERRYIsland Queen

 

 

 

 

 

ENSIGN LEVEL SPONSOR: BOSTON MARINE SOCIETYBoston Marine Society

 

Tuesday, April 12, 7 pm: Lou Ureneck, “The Great Fire: One American’s Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century’s First Genocide

The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay.

With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people.

Thursday, April 21, 7 pm: Christopher Daley, “Murder and Mayhem in Boston: Historic Crimes in the Hub”

Boston’s history is checkered with violence and heinous crimes. In 1845, a woman lured into prostitution was murdered at the hands of her jealous lover who used sleepwalking as his defense at trial. A leg was found floating along the Boston Harbor, wrapped in a burlap bag that would later be connected to a woman who was brutally murdered and dismembered by her handyman. In the 1970s, a string of seemingly unconnected murders led to a killer who became known as the Giggler. Christopher Daley explores the tragic events that turned peaceful Boston neighborhoods into disturbing crime scenes.

Saturday, April 23, 2 pm: William Geroux, “The Mathews Men: Seven Brothers and the War Against Hitler’s U-Boats”

Mathews County, Virginia, is a remote outpost on the Chesapeake Bay with little to offer except unspoiled scenery—but it sent one of the largest concentrations of sea captains and U.S. merchant mariners of any community in America to fight in World War II. The Mathews Men tells that heroic story through the experiences of one extraordinary family whose seven sons (and their neighbors), U.S. merchant mariners all, suddenly found themselves squarely in the cross-hairs of the U-boats bearing down on the coastal United States in 1942. From the late 1930s to 1945, virtually all the fuel, food and munitions that sustained the Allies in Europe traveled not via the Navy but in merchant ships. After Pearl Harbor, those unprotected ships instantly became the U-boats’ prime targets. And they were easy targets—the Navy lacked the inclination or resources to defend them until the beginning of 1943. Hitler was determined that his U-boats should sink every American ship they could find, sometimes within sight of tourist beaches, and to kill as many mariners as possible, in order to frighten their shipmates into staying ashore. As the war progressed, men from Mathews sailed the North and South Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean, and even the icy Barents Sea in the Arctic Circle, where they braved the dreaded Murmansk Run. Through their experiences we have eyewitnesses to every danger zone, in every kind of ship. Some died horrific deaths. Others fought to survive torpedo explosions, flaming oil slicks, storms, shark attacks, mine blasts, and harrowing lifeboat odysseys—only to ship out again on the next boat as soon as they’d returned to safety.

Wednesday, April 27, 7 pm: Joseph Bagley, “A History of Boston in 50 Artifacts”

History is right under our feet; we just need to dig a little to find it. Though not the most popular construction project, Boston’s Big Dig has contributed more to our understanding and appreciation of the city’s archaeological history than any other recent event. Joseph M. Bagley, city archaeologist of Boston, uncovers a fascinating hodgepodge of history—from ancient fishing grounds to Jazz Age red-light districts—that will surprise and delight even longtime residents. Each artifact is shown in full color and accompanied by description of the item’s significance to its site location and the larger history of the city. From cannonballs to drinking cups and from ancient spears to chinaware, A History of Boston in 50 Artifacts offers a unique and accessible introduction to Boston’s history and physical culture while revealing the ways objects can offer a tantalizing entrée into our past.

Friday, May 6, 7 pm: Joseph Williams, “Seventeen Fathoms Deep: The Saga of the Submarine S-4 Disaster”

After being accidentally rammed by the Coast Guard destroyer USS Paulding on December 17, 1927, the USS S-4 submarine sank to the ocean floor off Cape Cod with all forty crew aboard. Only six sailors in the forward torpedo room survived the initial accident, trapped in the compartment with the oxygen running out.
Author and naval historian Joseph A. Williams has delved into never-revealed archival sources to tell the compelling narrative of the S-4 disaster, the first attempt to rescue survivors stranded aboard a modern submarine. As navy deep sea divers struggled to save the imprisoned men, a winter storm raged at the surface, creating some of the worst diving conditions in American history. Circumstances were so terrible that one diver, Fred Michels, became trapped in the wreckage while trying to attach an air hose to the sunken sub—the rescuer now needed to be rescued. It was only through the bravery of a second diver, Thomas Eadie, that Michels was saved. As detailed in Seventeen Fathoms Deep, lessons learned during this great tragedy moved the US Navy to improve submarine rescue technology, which resulted in later successful rescues of other downed submariners.

Thursday, May 19, 7pm: Reid Mitenbuler, “Bourbon Empire: The Past and Future of America’s Whiskey”

Bourbon EmpireWhiskey has profoundly influenced America’s political, economic, and cultural destiny, just as those same factors have inspired the evolution and unique flavor of the whiskey itself. Unraveling the many myths and misconceptions surrounding America’s most iconic spirit, Bourbon Empire traces a history that spans frontier rebellion, Gilded Age corruption, and the magic of Madison Avenue. Taking readers behind the curtain of an enchanting—and sometimes exasperating—industry, the work of writer Reid Mitenbuler crackles with attitude and commentary about taste, choice, and history. Few products better embody the United States, or American business, than bourbon.

 

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

May 22nd: Falmouth Walk for History

Walk for History—Sunday, May 22, 2016, 8:00-11:00 am

FALMOUTH HISTORY WALK IS ON FOR MAY 22!

The Museums on the Green invites you to the first  “Falmouth History Walk” on Sunday, May 22nd.  Along the 5k (3.1 miles) walk you will meet costumed characters from Falmouth’s history. You can come in costume, too, or just come as you are.  Prizes will be awarded for best costumes, but chiefly the walk is intended for all, especially families, to participate and appreciate our local history.  Beginning and ending at the Museums on the Green, the path will travel past a number of historic homes and sites in Falmouth. Along the way, at various venues, there will be costumed re-enactors and signs  to signifythat the particular location is of historical importance. You are going to meet pirates, complete with their ship, along the route.

Walkers can go at their own pace. Self-timed runners are also welcome.  Refreshments and a takeaway item will be presented at the finish line.  All funds benefit the Museums on the Green, home of the Falmouth Historical Society.

Registration begins at 8:00 a.m..  The walk begins at 9 a.m.  Participants are asked to park at the Lawrence School, 113 Lakeview, Falmouth, and walk across the field to the registration area at the Museums on the Green.  There is no on-street parking available, and no parking in the Congregational Church parking lot.

FalmouthHistoricalWalk2916The walk route:

  • Katharine Lee Bates Road to Shore Road extension
  • Cross Main Street to Shore Street
  • Shore Street to Surf Drive
  • Surf Drive to Mill Road
  • Mill Road to Locust Street
  • Locust Street to West Main Street
  • West Main Street to Hewins Street to Museums on the Green

 

 

Advance registration fee is $ 15 per entrant; $ 30 for immediate families of three or more. Registration fee at the event is $20 per entrant or $40 for immediate families of three or more. To register, fill out the information below, or print registration form and mail with check to Museums on the Green, PO Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541.

History Walk Registration Form

 

Please click HERE to read FALMOUTH WALK FOR HISTORY 2016 RELEASE FORM

*Name:

Address:

Phone:

*Email:

Other Family Members in group:

Read and acknowledge this General Release Form

I represent that I am in good health and in proper physical condition and state of mind to participate in the Walk and accept sole responsibility for my own well-being, conduct, and actions while participating in the Walk and the well-being, conduct and actions of any minors that accompany me during the Walk. I agree to abide by the decision of any Walk official or public safety officer relative to my ability to safely complete the Walk, further acknowledging that I assume all risk associated with the Walk and am solely responsible for knowing whether I should withdraw from the Walk at any time due to weather, health or wellness considerations.

Having read this waiver and knowing these facts, I hereby expressly assume all risks of participating in the Walk and any pre- or post-Walk activities for both myself and for any minors that may accompany me. Further, for myself and for my spouse, children, guardians, heirs and next of kin, and any legal and personal representatives, I hereby waive and release and agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Museums on the Green, Inc., the Town of Falmouth, Massachusetts, and all of their sponsors, directors, officers, employees, agents, representatives and successors (collectively and individually, as the context may require, the “Released Parties”) from and against any and all claims, causes of action, damages, or liabilities of any kind or nature whatsoever arising out of my participation in the Walk and any pre- and post-Walk activities, even though such claim, cause of action or liability may arise in whole or in part out of negligence or carelessness on the part of the Released Parties.

I grant to Museums on the Green and its sponsors and licensees the exclusive right to the free use of my image, name, my voice, and/or my picture or recording in any broadcast, telecast, advertising, promotion or other account of the Walk. I acknowledge that my entry fee is non-refundable, including if the race is cancelled. I agree I will not chargeback or dispute the relevant credit card transaction. Issuance of a Walk number is a license, only, revocable in the discretion of the Walk in the event of my violation of any law or any Walk policy, including disruption of the Walk, or my failure to follow directions given by public safety officials or Walk officials.
By proceeding with this event registration, I agree that the terms of this Registration Agreement shall apply equally to me and to any third parties for whom you are acting as agent. I represent and warrant that if I am registering a child under eighteen (18) years of age I am the parent or legal guardian of such child. Further, in consideration of the entry of any child under the age of eighteen (18), I, as the parent or legal guardian of the entrant, agree to all the conditions hereof on behalf of the entrant, intending them to be bound fully by the terms hereof, and agreeing to the above on my own behalf, according to the terms stated herein.

ADVANCE ENTRY FEE:
 $15 per registrant $30 families of two or more

Please enclose check payable to Museums on the Green
Mail to: P. O. Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541

Date:

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Fill in the information below to register online with Paypal.

 


Number of Entrants




Participants are encouraged–but it is certainly not necessary–to wear costumes as they do their walk, of any period in Falmouth history (from 1686 to the 1960’s). Prizes for the best costumes will be awarded.  Need ideas as to what people wore during a certain era?  Click on below for links to historical dress from various periods:Colonial ClothingRevolutionary War EraVictorian Era

Civil War Era

Roaring Twenties

World War 2 Era

1950’s Clothing

1960’s Clothing

Tuesday, May 24, 7 pm: Christopher Oldstone Moore: “Of Beards and Men: The Revealing History of Facial Hair”

Of Beards and ManBeards—they’re all the rage these days. Take a look around: from hip urbanites to rustic outdoorsmen, well-groomed metrosexuals to post-season hockey players, facial hair is everywhere. The New York Times traces this hairy trend to Big Apple hipsters circa 2005 and reports that today some New Yorkers pay thousands of dollars for facial hair transplants to disguise patchy, juvenile beards. And in 2014, blogger Nicki Daniels excoriated bearded hipsters for turning a symbol of manliness and power into a flimsy fashion statement. The beard, she said, has turned into the padded bra of masculinity. Of Beards and Men makes the case that today’s bearded renaissance is part of a centuries-long cycle in which facial hairstyles have varied in response to changing ideals of masculinity. Christopher Oldstone-Moore explains that the clean-shaven face has been the default style throughout Western history—see Alexander the Great’s beardless face, for example, as the Greek heroic ideal. But the primacy of razors has been challenged over the years by four great bearded movements, beginning with Hadrian in the second century and stretching to today’s bristled resurgence. The clean-shaven face today, Oldstone-Moore says, has come to signify a virtuous and sociable man, whereas the beard marks someone as self-reliant and unconventional. History, then, has established specific meanings for facial hair, which both inspire and constrain a man’s choices in how he presents himself to the world. This fascinating and erudite history of facial hair cracks the masculine hair code, shedding light on the choices men make as they shape the hair on their faces. Oldstone-Moore adeptly lays to rest common misperceptions about beards and vividly illustrates the connection between grooming, identity, culture, and masculinity. To a surprising degree, we find, the history of men is written on their faces.

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

Tuesday, May 31, 7 pm: Candy Leonard, “Beatleness: How the Beatles and their Fans Remade the World”

BeatlenessThe Beatles arrived in the United States on February 7, 1964, and immediately became a constant, compelling presence in fans’ lives. For the next six years, the band presented a nonstop deluge of sounds, words, images, and ideas, transforming the childhood and adolescence of millions of baby boomers.
Beatleness explains how the band became a source of emotional, intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual nurturance in fans’ lives, creating a relationship that was historically unique. Looking at that relationship against the backdrop of the sexual revolution, the Vietnam War, political assassinations, and other events of those tumultuous years, the book examines critically the often-heard assertion that the Beatles “changed everything” and shows how—through the interplay between the group, the fans, and the culture—that change came about.
A generational memoir and cultural history based on hundreds of hours of in-depth interviews with first-generation fans, Beatleness allows readers to experience—or re-experience—what it was like to be a young person during those eventful and transformative years. Its fresh approach offers many new insights into the entire Beatle phenomenon and explains why the group still means so much to so many.

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

Thursday, June 2, 7 pm: Jomarie Alano: “Partisan Diary: A Woman’s Life in the Italian Resistance”

Partisan DiaryAda Gobetti’s Partisan Diary is both diary and memoir. From a political and military point of view, the Partisan Diary provides firsthand knowledge of how the partisans in Piedmont fought, what obstacles they encountered, and who joined the struggle against the Nazis and the Fascists. The mountainous terrain and long winters of the Alpine regions (the site of many of their battles) and the ever-present threat of reprisals by German occupiers and their fascist partners exacerbated problems of organization among the various partisan groups. So arduous was their fight,that key military events–Italy’s declaration of war on Germany, the fall of Rome, and the Allied landings on D-Day –appear in the diary as remote and almost unrelated incidents. Ada Gobetti writes of the heartbreak of mothers who lost their sons or watched them leave on dangerous missions of sabotage, relating it to worries about her own son Paolo.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

June 6: Around the Sound Lighthouse Cruise

Monday, June 6, 2016: “Around the Sound Cruise” with the Island Queen,

5:30-7:30 pm

 IslandQueen_Leaving_Falmouth_Harbor

A Cruise Around Vineyard Sound as we explore the Sound on the way to the Vineyard, while celebrating the season

(Actual route will be determined that evening)

 Complimentary Appetizers and Light Fare (provided by Atria Woodbriar of Falmouth)     

Cash Bar (beer, wine, soft drinks, tea, coffee)

A unique opportunity to see and learn about some of the special sights of Cape Cod.  

Do Not Miss the Boat!

The dock for the Island Queen is at 75 Falmouth Heights Road, Falmouth, MA.

Be there by 5 PM to check-in and board.  Island Queen leaves at 5:30 sharp and returns at 7:30 PM. Exact route is dependent on weather and tides.  Please carpool. Free dockside parking is limited.

Casual Dress. Recommended to bring a windbreaker and/or sweater and to wear rubber-soled shoes.

To purchase tickets for this special cruise:


Around the Sound Cruise June 6, 2016





Cancellations:

If the Island Queen cannot sail, such as in the case of severe weather, the cruise will be postponed until the fall of 2016. If the Island Queen is unable to sail on the designated fall rain date, the cruise will be cancelled. You can then choose to convert your payment to a 100% donation or have your payment refunded. We will post notices of a postponement or cancellation on our website, www.museumsonthegreen.org. We will endeavor to arrange to have such notices also posted on the Island Queen website: www.islandqueen.com




 

 

Wednesday, June 8, 7pm: Michael McNaught, “Battle of Verdun 1916”

VerdunIn 1916, at the height of World War One, came Verdun–considered by many to be the greatest and lengthiest in world history. Never before or since has there been a battle of such duration, involving so many men on such a small plot of land. The conflict, which lasted from 21 February 1916 to 19 December 1916, led to casualties estimated at over 700,000 killed, wounded or missing. The battlefield itself was not even 10 square kilometers in size. From a strategic point of view, there could be no justification for these atrocious losses. The battle degenerated into a matter of prestige and principle for two nations, Germany and France, who continued fighting simply for the sake of fighting.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Friday, June 10, 4 pm: Nathaniel Philbrick, “Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold and the fate of the American Revolution”

PLEASE NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 68 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Philbrick Valiant AmbitionIn September 1776, the vulnerable Continental Army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the British Army. Three weeks later, near the Canadian border, one of his favorite generals, Benedict Arnold, miraculously succeeds in postponing the British naval advance down Lake Champlain that might have ended the war. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons and Arnold has fled to the enemy after a foiled attempt to surrender the American fortress at West Point to the British. After four years of war, America is forced to realize that the real threat to its liberties might not come from without but from within.
Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation. The focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of Washington and Arnold, who is an impulsive but sympathetic hero whose misfortunes at the hands of self-serving politicians fatally destroy his faith in the legitimacy of the rebellion. As a country wary of tyrants suddenly must figure out how it should be led, Washington’s unmatched ability to rise above the petty politics of his time enables him to win the war that really matters.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Saturday, June 11, 2 pm: Misha Teramura, “The Professional Life of William Shakespeare”

Shakespeare2016 is the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. Harvard educated Misha Teramura looks at what it was like to be a playwright in Renaissance London; some of the actors for whom Shakespeare wrote; his friends and rivals, his patrons and publishers; and other aspects of “The Bard’s” life.

This lecture sponsored by the Cooperative Bank of Cape CodCBCC logo

Wednesday, June 15, 7 pm: Howard Blum, “The Last Goodnight: A World War II Story of Espionage, Adventure and Betrayal”

The Last GoodnightBetty Pack was a dazzling American debutante became an Allied spy during WWII and was hailed by OSS chief General “Wild Bill” Donovan as “the greatest unsung heroine of the war.” She was charming, beautiful and intelligent—and she knew it. As an agent for Britain’s MI-6 and then America’s OSS during World War II, these qualities proved crucial to her success. This is the remarkable story of this “Mata Hari from Minnesota” and the passions that ruled her tempestuous life—a life filled with dangerous liaisons and death-defying missions vital to the Allied victory.

For decades, much of Betty’s career working for MI-6 and the OSS remained classified. Through access to recently unclassified files, Howard Blum discovers the truth about the attractive blond, codenamed “Cynthia,” who seduced diplomats and military attachés across the globe in exchange for ciphers and secrets; cracked embassy safes to steal codes; and obtained the Polish notebooks that proved key to Alan Turing’s success with Operation Ultra.Beneath Betty’s cool, professional determination, Blum reveals a troubled woman conflicted by the very traits that made her successful: her lack of deep emotional connections and her readiness to risk everything. The Last Goodnight is a mesmerizing, provocative, and moving portrait of an exceptional heroine whose undaunted courage helped to save the world.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Thursday, June 16, 7 pm: Jim Haskell: Appalachian Trail Adventures lecture

Thursday, June 16, 7 pm: Appalachian Trail Adventures

Map_of_Appalachian_TrailThere are two ways to hike the 2,190-mile Appalachian Trail – thru-hiking it all at once or section hiking it one part at a time. Museums on the Green will feature four men who have done it both ways during a unique Appalachian Trail program at the Cultural Center. Three young college men and friends from Mashpee – Michael Demanche, Brett Depolo and Sam Kooharian – will share their experiences of thru-hiking the trail together from Georgia to Maine in 2015. Jim Haskell of Ipswich, MA, will recount his stories of section hiking the entire trail, trekking roughly 100 miles a year, during 21 consecutive years. His book about his experiences, Two Tents: Twenty-one Years of Discovery on the Appalachian Trail, will be available. The men’s recollections of the people and places they encountered, their photographs of the stunning vistas they viewed, as well as a generous offering of the trail’s nearly 100-year history, promises to provide an informative and entertaining evening.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Thursday, June 23, 7 pm: David Dowling, “Surviving the Essex: The Afterlife of America’s Most Storied Shipwreck”

Surviving the EssexThe Essexthe famous shipwreck that inspired Moby Dick—and its aftermath is a captivating story of a ship’s crew battered by whale attack, broken by four months at sea, and forced—out of necessity—to make meals of their fellow survivors. Dowling delves into the ordeal’s submerged history—the survivors’ lives, ambitions and motives, their pivotal actions during the desperate moments of the wreck itself, and their will to reconcile those actions and their consequences.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Tuesday, June 28, 7pm: Julie Fenster, “Jefferson’s America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers who Transformed a Nation”

Jefferson's AmericaAt the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation.

Responsible for orchestrating the American push into the continent was President Thomas Jefferson. He most famously recruited Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, who led the Corps of Discovery to the Pacific, but at the same time there were other teams who did the same work, in places where it was even more crucial. William Dunbar, George Hunter, Thomas Freeman, Peter Custis, and the dauntless Zebulon Pike—all were dispatched on urgent missions to map the frontier and keep up a steady correspondence with Washington about their findings.
But they weren’t always well-matched—with each other and certainly not with a Spanish army of a thousand soldiers or more. These tensions threatened to undermine Jefferson’s goals for the nascent country, leaving the United States in danger of losing its foothold in the West. Deeply researched and inspiringly told, Jefferson’s America rediscovers the robust and often harrowing action from these seminal expeditions and illuminates the president’s vision for a continental America.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Inspired by Nature: A Collaborative Program for Young Adults age 9-12

HOW DO HABITATS IMPACT OUR EXISTENCE?

The Cape’s habitats impact science, technology, art, music, history–every part of our daily existence. This summer, your child will explore the many habitats found right here in Falmouth and how they have influenced those who inhabit them.

We invite your child to engage their curiosity as the Cape Cod Conservatory, the Falmouth Art Center, the Falmouth Museums on the Green, Salt Pond Areas Bird Sanctuaries and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration partner with the Falmouth Public Schools to explore the Cape’s habitats.

Guided by teachers and local experts, your child will embark on a five-day hands-on adventure to understand the role and importance of HABITATS on our world and culture.

Inspired by Nature flyer 2016

Inspired by Nature for Website 2

 

 

Inspired by Nature for Website

Join us Monday, June 27th through Friday, July 1st, 9 am to 1 pm.

Register Early: Enrollment is limited to 25 students.  $ 175 per student.

For more information, call email [email protected] or call 508-540-0611

This program made possible by a grant from the Edward Bangs Kelley and Elza Kelley Foundation, Inc., and the  Gordon T. Heald Fund.

 

June 30, 6 pm: Sea Shanties with Tom Goux: FREE!

Rum Soaked CrooksIt will be an evening of salty songs on the Falmouth Historical Society lawn, Thursday, June 23, 6:00PM, when The New Bedford Harbor Sea Chantey Chorus and The Shifty Sailors, a musical crew from the Pacific Northwest, join Falmouth’s own Rum-Soaked Crooks for a proper “gam” and sing-song.

Formed in 2000, under the direction of Tom Goux, the 25 voice chorus presents a repertoire that reflects the rich maritime heritage of New Bedford and the region.  Weaving musical traditions connected to New Bedford Harbor and the New England seafarer, their performances feature the chanteys (work songs) of the Yankee sailor and whaler, ballads and ditties of global mariners and songs of coastwise fisherfolk in North America, the Cape Verde Islands and the British Isles.

Shifty SailorsThe Shifty Sailors hail from Whidbey Island – famed and framed in Puget Sound, just northwest of Seattle, Washington.   For over two decades, this group, much like the local singers on the program,  has manifested their passion for maritime history and heritage in collecting and sharing their music  in concert at festivals, civic events, and charitable organizations in Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, California, Oregon, Hawaii, British Columbia, Ireland and, of course, Washington State. The “Shifties” have also found their way to stages in Europe – the Baltic Sea Countries, France, Prague, the British Isles, and Ireland.

The Rum Soaked Crooks  ~ Tom Goux, Jacek Sulanowski, Dan Lanier and Iain Geddes-RumSoakedCrooks– have been cruising the New England shoreline (and beyond) for the last three decades and have inflicted much musical and poetic damage with a pungent mix of sailors’ chanteys, ballads and ditties.  There is often irrefutable evidence left in their wake: victims leaving the scene with toes tapping and choruses ringing in their heads, as they happily hum and whistle all the way home.

 

The Crooks have shared their songs and stories, both historical and contemporary, at festivals and maritime events across the country and in Europe, and have recorded on the Smithsonian-Folkways and Whaling City Sound labels.  Their repertoire spans three centuries of seafaring melody and verse, featuring an exceptional sampling of Cape and Islands sea songs and poetry.

 

July 13: Hydrangea Fest on Cape Cod

Hydrangea Fest

Hydrangeas are the signature flower of Cape Cod, and the inaugural Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival will celebrate these beautiful blue, pink and white blooms at their peak!
Take a glimpse into some of Cape Cod’s most spectacular gardens during the Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival, from July 10-17, 2016. The festival will include tours of all types of private gardens organized by local nonprofits and museums, along with special hydrangea-themed events and promotions.

The Museums on the Green will be a participant in this event as well. Five locations are scheduled to take part on behalf of the Museums, and will be open on Wednesday, July 13, from 10 am to 4 pm. Those locations are:

 

Captain’s Manor Inn, 27 W. Main Street, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

The Inn was originally built in 1849 by Captain Albert Nye as a family home. The second owner, Captain John Robinson Lawrence had a son H. V. Lawrence who became a well known horticulturist and the first florist on Cape Cod.  The grounds of the Inn bear witness to his talents with many unique trees that survive to this day.  The property hosts gardens in the front and back of the Inn on 1.2 acres. There are hydrangeas and azaleas in both the front and back gardens and numerous varieties of day lilies, roses, hostas, bell flowers, peonies, pansies, dahlias etc.

28 Sady’s Lane, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This garden was featured in Cape Cod Home magazine in fall 2015 and be featured in a national gardening magazine in 2017. Visitors will experience surprising vistas and vignettes while strolling the winding garden paths. A stone patio walled by espaliered pear trees and dogwood, archways of beech trees and hydrangea, and a small pond are some of the features of the thirty year old garden. The summer garden includes collections of daylilies, hosta, and hydrangea. Annuals, tropical plants, and container plants accent the garden borders

383 Boxberry Hill Road, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This site and the restored home were part of the original 19th century Silas Hatch Homestead (giving the village the name Hatchville) and became the agricultural center of Falmouth. In the 1920’s it became the largest dairy farm east of the Mississippi and remains of that activity can be found on the property.  Today the Hidden House Farm grows organic vegetables and fruits along with a modest selection of common New England herbs with a bit of a contemporary touch.  It has, say some old timers, more “boxberry trees” on this property than anywhere else. This site was once part of a working farm. The home is not on the main road but fronts on a bridal path that is hidden from view and surrounded by horse farms, 300 acres of local conservation to the east and 600 acres of protected state land to the north.

Palmer House Inn, 81 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

At the Inn, there are four buildings and four small gardens. Before going to see the gardens, stop at the Inn’s side veranda to enjoy lemonade and cookies.  The first, garden is the T.W Burgess Garden that is home to several rabbits and is a cool shady spot for guests to relax on a warm summer’s afternoon. Next, there is the H.D.Thoreau Cottage Garden that gives this secluded cottage suite its own private bit of nature. Third, the Innkeeper’s Cottage garden is a pleasant shade garden located at the back of the inn’s property. Last but not least, one can walk through the inn’s herb garden, where the organically grown herbs are located in individual stone bordered beds. The herbs are used in the inn’s sumptuous breakfasts. We suggest that those coming to view the garden, park at the Falmouth Museums on the Green parking lot on Katharine Lee Bates Road. After parking one can stroll through the Museum’s lovely colonial gardens. Upon exiting the garden gate, turn right and take the sidewalk to the Palmer House Inn.

37 Arthur Street, North Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This is a woodland garden on a 2 acre, hilly site where winding lawns are bordered by mixed beds of flowering trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals.  There are many of the standbys – kousas, vibernums, day lilies, hostas by the dozens, heuchera, peonies, iris, roses, sedges, candelabra primulas, lambs ears, grasses, salvias, ageratum, nicotianas, cannas, astilbes – and some less standard – filipendula, jack in the pulpits, podophyllum.  This years’ experiment is lilies of several kinds, missing for several years because of red beetles but willing to try again.  Wear walking shoes – there are woodland paths down to a pond and uphill to an overview of the largest part of the garden.

Each venue will cost $ 5 to attend per person. Tickets can be purchased at each venue or by going to the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce. You can also purchase tickets here:


Hydrangea Fest
Falmouth venues Hydrangea Fest



To learn more about this event Cape-wide, click on http://www.capecodchamber.org/hydrangea-fest

 

Thursday, July 14, 7 pm: Robert Weintraub, “No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog, and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage and Survival in World War II”

No Better FriendFlight technician Frank Williams and Judy, a purebred pointer, met in the most unlikely of places: a World War II internment camp in the Pacific. Judy was a fiercely loyal dog, with a keen sense for who was friend and who was foe, and the pair’s relationship deepened throughout their captivity. When the prisoners suffered beatings, Judy would repeatedly risk her life to intervene. She survived bombings and other near-death experiences and became a beacon not only for Frank but for all the men, who saw in her survival a flicker of hope for their own. Judy’s devotion to those she was interned with was matched by their love for her, which helped keep the men and their dog alive despite the ever-present threat of death by disease or the rifles of the guards. At one point, deep in despair and starvation, Frank contemplated killing himself and the dog to prevent either from watching the other die. But both were rescued, and Judy spent the rest of her life with Frank. She became the war’s only official canine POW, and after she died at age fourteen, Frank couldn’t bring himself to ever have another dog. Their story–of an unbreakable bond forged in the worst circumstances–is one of the great undiscovered sagas of World War II.

Wednesday, July 27, 7 pm: Manisha Sinha, “The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition”

Slaves CauseReceived historical wisdom casts abolitionists as mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. University of Massachusetts Professor Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave’s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.

Wednesday, July 20, 7 pm: Charlotte Gordon, “Romantic Outlaws: The Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter Mary Shelley”

romantic outlawsThis groundbreaking dual biography brings to life a pioneering English feminist and the daughter she never knew. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley have each been the subject of numerous biographies, yet no one has ever examined their lives in one book—until now. In Romantic Outlaws,Charlotte Gordon reunites the trailblazing author who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and the Romantic visionary who gave the world Frankenstein—two courageous women who should have shared their lives, but instead shared a powerful literary and feminist legacy.

In 1797, less than two weeks after giving birth to her second daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft died, and a remarkable life spent pushing against the boundaries of society’s expectations for women came to an end. But another was just beginning. Wollstonecraft’s daughter Mary was to follow a similarly audacious path. Both women had passionate relationships with several men, bore children out of wedlock, and chose to live in exile outside their native country. Each in her own time fought against the injustices women faced and wrote books that changed literary history. The private lives of both Marys were nothing less than the stuff of great Romantic drama, providing fabulous material for Charlotte Gordon, an accomplished historian and a gifted storyteller. Taking readers on a vivid journey across revolutionary France and Victorian England, she seamlessly interweaves the lives of her two protagonists in alternating chapters, creating a book that reads like a richly textured historical novel. Gordon also paints unforgettable portraits of the men in their lives, including the mercurial genius Percy Shelley, the unbridled libertine Lord Byron, and the brilliant radical William Godwin.

Wednesday August 10, 7 pm: Ian Toll, “The Conquering Tide: War in the Pacific Islands, 1942-1944”

conquering tideThis masterful history encompasses the heart of the Pacific War―the period between mid-1942 and mid-1944―when parallel Allied counteroffensives north and south of the equator washed over Japan’s far-flung island empire like a “conquering tide,” concluding with Japan’s irreversible strategic defeat in the Marianas. It was the largest, bloodiest, most costly, most technically innovative and logistically complicated amphibious war in history, and it fostered bitter interservice rivalries, leaving wounds that even victory could not heal.Often overlooked, these are the years and fights that decided the Pacific War. Historian Ian W. Toll’s battle scenes―in the air, at sea, and in the jungles―are simply riveting. He also takes the reader into the wartime councils in Washington and Tokyo where politics and strategy often collided, and into the struggle to mobilize wartime production, which was the secret of Allied victory. Brilliantly researched, the narrative is propelled and colored by firsthand accounts―letters, diaries, debriefings, and memoirs―that are the raw material of the telling details, shrewd judgment, and penetrating insight of this magisterial history.

August 19, 1:30 pm: Paul Clerici, “A History of the Falmouth Road Race”

Falmouth Road Race“A History of the Falmouth Road Race: Running Cape Cod” written by Massachusetts runner and author Paul C. Clerici – is a thoroughly entertaining and well-researched historical chronicle of the famous seven-mile road race. Featuring over 40 years worth of stories, anecdotes, tales, and tidbits, finally there is a book that tells this compelling story from the beginning. It features nearly 80 photographs that span the decades – some of which published here for the first time – and through dozens of interviews specific for this book, there are countless detailed recollections and insights from the likes of longtime volunteers; sponsors; founder Tommy Leonard; organizers John and Lucia Carroll, Rich and Kathy Sherman; local runners such as Olympic gold medalist Colleen Coyne, NASA astronaut Sunita “Suni” Williams; and legendary athletes including Bill Rodgers, Frank Shorter, Alberto Salazar, Rod Dixon, Craig Virgin, Henry Rono, Joan Benoit Samuelson, Jen Rhines, Lynn Jennings, Lornah Kiplagat, Catherine Ndereba, Craig Blanchette, Tatyana McFadden, Suzy Favor Hamilton, Jordan McNamara, and many others. In addition is a foreword by Tommy Leonard

Historic Trolley Tours of Falmouth: Beginning September 7, 2016

HISTORIC TROLLEY TOURS OF FALMOUTH BEGIN SEPTEMBER 7TH!

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED! To make a reservation, call 508-548-4857, ext. 11!

Trolley Tour PhotoEnjoy an historic trolley tour of Falmouth on Wednesday mornings at 10am.  Five different dates are available:  September 7, 14, 21 & 28, as well as October 5.  Trolleys are enclosed and climate-controlled, allowing the tours to take place rain or shine.

These narrated tours will take visitors along some of the oldest thoroughfares in Falmouth, traveling through downtown Falmouth, Falmouth Heights, Woods Hole and other scenic locales, and will engage those on board about the seafaring history of the town. A stop will also be made at Highfield Hall & Gardens.  Tickets for the two-hour excursion are $ 25 for Historical Society members and $ 30 for non-members.  Reservations are required and these tours have sold out in the past.  To make a reservation, email [email protected] or call 508-548-4857. Tours begin and end at the Falmouth Museums on the Green, 55 & 65 Palmer Avenue.  Those taking the tour should be at the Museums’ Hallett Barn no later than 9:45 am the morning of their reservation.

Credit card reservations should be made at least 48 hours in advance to guarantee that there is room on the trolley. To make a reservation via credit card, click below:


Historic Trolley Tours of Falmouth
Historic Trolley Tours of Falmouth
Which Trolley Tour Date Are You Reserving?



 

 

 

Saturday, Sept. 17, 3 pm: Jerry Thornton, “From Darkness to Dynasty: The First 40 Years of the New England Patriots”

Darkness to DynastyLove them or hate them, what the New England Patriots have been able to do over the past fifteen years is nothing short of remarkable. In addition to their four Super Bowl championships, the Patriots have the best coach in the league, a smart and savvy front office, and a future Hall of Fame quarterback who is internationally recognized as the face of the NFL. The longer the Patriots continue to dominate on the field as well as in the media and the American pop culture landscape, the harder it becomes for anyone to remember them as something other than a model franchise and the ultimate paradigm of success and accomplishment.

Anyone, that is, except for Jerry Thornton. It wasn’tJerry Thornton always sunshine and roses for the Patriots; in fact, for the bulk of their existence, it was exactly the opposite. Though difficult to fathom now, the New England Patriots of old weren’t just bad—they were laughably bad. Not so long ago, the Pats were the laughingstock of not only the NFL but also the entire sporting world.

From Darkness to Dynasty tells the unlikely history of the New England Patriots as it has never been told before. From their humble beginnings as a team bought with rainy-day money by a man who had no idea what he was doing to the fateful season that saw them win their first Super Bowl, Jerry Thornton shares the wild, humiliating, unbelievable, and wonderful stories that comprised the first forty years of what would ultimately become the most dominant franchise in NFL history. Witty, hilarious, and brutally honest, From Darkness to Dynasty returns to the thrilling, perilous days of yesteryear—a welcome corrective for those who hate the Patriots and a useful reminder for those who love them that all glory is fleeting.

 

September 20: Bus Trip to Museum of World War II, Natick, MA

On Tuesday, September 20 at 9:00 am, the Museums on the Green will host a bus trip to the Museum of World War II in Natick, MA. The largest and most comprehensive private collection of World War II artifacts found anywhere in the world, the Museum of World War II makes it its mission to uniquely show the human story interwoven with the military and political events thru all of the artifacts that made up life, from everyday, to the most momentous decisions during the war.

Natick

Space is limited for this special event. Tickets for this are $ 60 each and include transportation to and from Natick as well as Museum admission. Lunch will be separate and held at the Natick Mall.

Please send in a check for $ 60 for each person going NO LATER than September 2, 2016. Checks should be made out to: Falmouth Historical Society, PO Box 174, Falmouth, MA 02541. You can also pay by credit card below:


Bus Trip to Museum of World War II, Sept. 20 2016



Additionally, each person going must print and sign the Museum of World War II’s waiver form and bring that with them. Please click below to get the form: 

Museum of World War II Waiver Form

Wednesday, September 21, 7 pm: Emerson Baker, “A Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience”

Storm of WitchcraftBeginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers–mainly young women–suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history.

Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria–but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was “a perfect storm”: a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since.Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak–the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them–and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy

Wednesday, September 28, 7 pm: Nathalia Holt, “Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars”

The riveting true story of the women who launched America into space.

Rise of the Rocket GirlsIn the 1940s and 50s, when the newly minted Jet Propulsion Laboratory needed quick-thinking mathematicians to calculate velocities and plot trajectories, they didn’t turn to male graduates. Rather, they recruited an elite group of young women who, with only pencil, paper, and mathematical prowess, transformed rocket design, helped bring about the first American satellites, and made the exploration of the solar system possible.
For the first time, Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the stories of these women–known as “human computers”–who broke the boundaries of both gender and science. Based on extensive research and interviews with all the living members of the team, Rise of the Rocket Girls offers a unique perspective on the role of women in science: both where we’ve been, and the far reaches of space to which we’re heading.

Wednesday, October 5, 7 pm: Alice Dreger, “Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists and the Search for Justice in Science”

alice_dregerAn impassioned defense of intellectual freedom and a clarion call to intellectual responsibility, Galileo’s Middle Finger is one American’s eye-opening story of life in the trenches of scientific controversy. For two decades, historian Alice Dreger has led a life of extraordinary engagement, combining activist service to victims of unethical medical research with defense of scientists whose work has outraged identity politics activists. With spirit and wit, Dreger offers in Galileo’s Middle Finger an unforgettable vision of the importance of rigorous truth seeking in today’s America, where both the free press and free scholarly inquiry struggle under dire economic and political threats.

Saturday, October 8, 3 pm: Sean McMeekin, “The Ottoman Endgame: War, Revolution and the Making of the Modern Middle East”

Ottoman EndgameBetween 1911 and 1922, a series of wars would engulf the Ottoman Empire and its successor states, in which the central conflict, of course, is World War I—a story we think we know well. As Sean McMeekin shows us in this revelatory new history of what he calls the “wars of the Ottoman succession,” we know far less than we think. The Ottoman Endgame brings to light the entire strategic narrative that led to an unstable new order in postwar Middle East—much of which is still felt today.

McMeekin also brilliantly reconceives our inherited Anglo-French understanding of the war’s outcome and the collapse of the empire that followed. He chronicles the emergence of modern Turkey and the carve-up of the rest of the Ottoman Empire offering a new perspective on such issues as the ethno-religious bloodletting and forced population transfers which attended the breakup of empire, the Balfour Declaration, the toppling of the caliphate, and the partition of Iraq and Syria—bringing the contemporary consequences into clear focus.

Sunday, October 9: Historic House Tour of Falmouth


museums-on-the-greenThe Inaugural Falmouth Historic Homes Tour is October 9!

Falmouth Museums on the Green, home of the Falmouth Historical Society, is proud to partner with Cape Cod Life to present the Inaugural Falmouth Historic Homes Tour on Sunday, October 9 from noon to 4 PM. This walking tour of Falmouth Village will showcase nine diverse locations, including private homes, inns, and the historic First Congregational Church of Falmouth. Tickets will include a fabulous swag bag full of goodies from local retailers.

TOUR STARTS AT HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S CULTURAL CENTER, 55 PALMER AVENUE. COME THERE TO PICK UP YOUR TICKET AND YOUR SWAG BAG!

Ticket prices are $ 25 in advance of the House Tour and $ 35 on the day of the event. 

Parking for the House Tour will be available in our parking lot off Katharine Lee Bates Road and at the 1st Congregational Church, 68 Main Street, Falmouth. 

To purchase tickets on day of event, come to Museums on the Green’s Cultural Center, 55 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth

Friday, Oct. 14, 5 pm: Heather Hendershot, “Open to Debate: How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on the Firing Line”

Open to DebateWhen Firing Line premiered on American television in 1966, just two years after Barry Goldwater’s devastating defeat, liberalism was ascendant. Though the left seemed to have decisively won the hearts and minds of the electorate, the show’s creator and host, William F. Buckley—relishing his role as a public contrarian—made the case for conservative ideas, believing that his side would ultimately win because its arguments were better. As the founder of the right’s flagship journal, National Review, Buckley spoke to likeminded readers. With Firing Line, he reached beyond conservative enclaves, engaging millions of Americans across the political spectrum.

Each week on Firing Line, Buckley and his guests—the cream of America’s intellectual class, such as Tom Wolfe, Noam Chomsky, Norman Mailer, Henry Kissinger, and Milton Friedman—debated the urgent issues of the day, bringing politics, culture, and economics into American living rooms as never before. Buckley himself was an exemplary host; he never appealed to emotion and prejudice; he engaged his guests with a unique and entertaining combination of principle, wit, fact, a truly fearsome vocabulary, and genuine affection for his adversaries.

Drawing on archival material, interviews, and transcripts, Open to Debate provides a richly detailed portrait of this widely respected ideological warrior, showing him in action as never before. Much more than just the story of a television show, Hendershot’s book provides a history of American public intellectual life from the 1960s through the 1980s—one of the most contentious eras in our history—and shows how Buckley led the way in drawing America to conservatism during those years.

Wednesday, October 19, 7 pm: Danny Orbach, “The Plots Against Hitler”

Plots Against HitlerIn 1933, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. A year later, all parties but the Nazis had been outlawed, freedom of the press was but a memory, and Hitler’s dominance seemed complete. Yet over the next few years, an unlikely clutch of conspirators emerged – soldiers, schoolteachers, politicians, diplomats, theologians, even a carpenter – who would try repeatedly to end the Fuhrer’s genocidal reign. This dramatic and deeply researched book tells the full story of those noble, ingenious, and doomed efforts. This is history at its most suspenseful, as we witness secret midnight meetings, crises of conscience, fierce debates among old friends about whether and how to dismantle Nazism, and the various plots themselves being devised and executed.

Orbach’s fresh research takes advantage of his singular skills as linguist and historian to offer profound insight into the conspirators’ methods, motivations, fears, and hopes. Though we know how this story ends, we’ve had no idea until now how close it came – several times – to ending very differently. The Plots Against Hitler fundamentally alters our view of World War II and sheds bright – even redemptive – light on its darkest days.

Friday, October 28, 2 pm: Craig Nelson, “Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness”

pearl-harborThe America we live in today was born, not on July 4, 1776, but on December 7, 1941, when an armada of 354 Japanese warplanes supported by aircraft carriers, destroyers, and midget submarines suddenly and savagely attacked the United States, killing 2,403 men—and forced America’s entry into World War II. Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness follows, moment by moment, the sailors, soldiers, pilots, diplomats, admirals, generals, emperor, and president as they engineer, fight, and react to this stunningly dramatic moment in world history.

Beginning in 1914, bestselling author Craig Nelson maps the road to war, beginning with Franklin D. Roosevelt, then the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (and not yet afflicted with polio), attending the laying of the keel of the USS Arizona at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Writing with vivid intimacy, Nelson traces Japan’s leaders as they lurch into ultranationalist fascism, which culminates in their insanely daring yet militarily brilliant scheme to terrify America with one of the boldest attacks ever waged. Within seconds, the country would never be the same.pearl-harbor-poster

In addition to learning the little understood history of how and why Japan attacked Hawaii, we hear an abandoned record player endlessly repeating “Sunrise Serenade” as bombs shatter the decks of the California; we feel cold terror as lanky young American sailors must anxiously choose between staying aboard their sinking ships or diving overboard into harbor waters aflame with burning ship fuel; we watch as Navy wives tearfully hide with their children in caves from a rumored invasion, and we understand the frustration and triumph of a lone American teenager as he shoots down a Japanese bomber, even as the attack destroys hundreds of US airplanes and dozens of ships.

Backed by a research team’s five years of work, which produced nearly a million pages of documents, as well as Nelson’s thorough re-examination of the original evidence assembled by federal investigators, this page-turning and definitive work provides a thrilling blow-by-blow account from both the Japanese and American perspectives, and is historical drama on the grandest scale. Nelson delivers all the terror, chaos, violence, tragedy, and heroism of the attack in stunning detail, and offers surprising conclusions about the tragedy’s unforeseen and resonant consequences that linger even today.

Thursday, November 3, 7 pm: Robert Cox, “New England Pie: History Under a Crust”

New England PiePie has been a delectable centerpiece of Yankee tables since Europeans first landed on New England’s shores in the seventeenth century. With a satisfying variety of savory and sweet, author Robert Cox takes a bite out of the history of pie and pie-making in the region. From the crackling topmost crust to the bottom layer, explore the origin and evolution of popular ingredients like the Revolutionary roots of the Boston cream. One month at a time, celebrate the seasonal fixings that fill New Englanders’ favorite dessert from apple and cherry to pumpkin and squash. With interviews from local bakers, classic recipes and some modern twists on beloved standards, this mouthwatering history of New England pies offers something for every appetite.

Saturday, November 5, 2 pm: Sven Beckert, “Empire of Cotton: A Global History”

WINNER OF THE BANCROFT PRIZE

PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST

Cotton pickers, 1800s.

Cotton pickers, 1800s.

The empire of cotton was, from the beginning, a fulcrum of constant global struggle between slaves and planters, merchants and statesmen, workers and factory owners. Sven Beckert makes clear how these forces ushered in the world of modern capitalism, including the vast wealth and disturbing inequalities that are with us today.
In a remarkably brief period, European entrepreneurs and powerful politicians recast the world’s most significant manufacturing industry, combining imperial expansion and slave labor with new machines and wage workers to make and remake global capitalism. The result is a book as unsettling as it is enlightening: a book that brilliantly weaves together the story of cotton with how the present global world came to exist.

Thursday, November 17, 7 pm: Paul Brandus: “Under This Roof: The White House and the Presidency–21 Presidents, 21 Rooms, 21 Inside Stories”

Under This RoofReporting from the West Wing briefing room since 2008, Brandus—the most followed White House journalist on Twitter (@WestWingReport)—weaves together stories of the presidents, their families, the events of their time—and an oft-ignored major character, the White House itself.
From George Washington—who selected the winning design for the White House—to the current occupant, Barack Obama—the story of the White House is the story of America itself. Through triumph and tragedy, boom and bust, secrets and scandals, Brandus takes you to the presidential bedroom, movie theater, Situation Room, Oval Office and more. Under This Roof is a “sensuous account of the history of both the home of the President, and the men and women who designed, inhabited, and decorated it.

This lecture sponsored by Martha’s Vineyard Savings BankMarthas Vineyard Savings logo

Thursday, December 8, 5-8 pm: Holiday Pop-Up Boutique with Cape Cod Winery

Join us in the Cultural Center for a festive and relaxed evening of local shopping and tastings from Cape Cod Winery. Stock up on unique gifts for the whole family from Cape Cod artists, artisans, and farmers. Apparel, artwork, jewelry, jam, and more!

Featuring: Cape Cloth, Cabo Cado, Wampanoag Shells, Wicked Weird Story Starters, Melefant

Woods Hole Woodcuts, Peachtree Circle Farm, Red Buzz Honey, Complexions Skincare, and the Seafoam Pinecone. Follow us on Facebook to see what great gift items are in store! holiday-season-sale

Wednesday, Dec. 7, 7:30 pm: Michael Holley: “Belichick and Brady: Two Men, the Patriots, and How They Revolutionized Football”

The epic, inside story of the rise and dominance of Tom Brady, Bill Belichick, and the New England Patriots. 

SPECIAL STARTING TIME: 7:30 pm

THIS LECTURE TO BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 91 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Belichick & Brady
Featuring interviews from Patriots players and coaches,WEEI’s Michael Holley presents a fascinating portrait of the partnership between Tom Brady, the Patriots’ star quarterback, and Bill Belichick, the team’s prolific coach. Chockful of behind-the-scenes anecdotes and information exploring how they have strategized and weathered controversies, all culminating into four Superbowl rings, this is required reading for any Patriots fan and students of the game of football.
By examining how the relationship between this dynamic quarterback and coach duo, Holley explores exactly how these two men have formed the core of the greatest dynasty in the modern-day NFL.