July 13: Hydrangea Fest on Cape Cod

Hydrangea Fest

Hydrangeas are the signature flower of Cape Cod, and the inaugural Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival will celebrate these beautiful blue, pink and white blooms at their peak!
Take a glimpse into some of Cape Cod’s most spectacular gardens during the Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival, from July 10-17, 2016. The festival will include tours of all types of private gardens organized by local nonprofits and museums, along with special hydrangea-themed events and promotions.

The Museums on the Green will be a participant in this event as well. Five locations are scheduled to take part on behalf of the Museums, and will be open on Wednesday, July 13, from 10 am to 4 pm. Those locations are:

 

Captain’s Manor Inn, 27 W. Main Street, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

The Inn was originally built in 1849 by Captain Albert Nye as a family home. The second owner, Captain John Robinson Lawrence had a son H. V. Lawrence who became a well known horticulturist and the first florist on Cape Cod.  The grounds of the Inn bear witness to his talents with many unique trees that survive to this day.  The property hosts gardens in the front and back of the Inn on 1.2 acres. There are hydrangeas and azaleas in both the front and back gardens and numerous varieties of day lilies, roses, hostas, bell flowers, peonies, pansies, dahlias etc.

28 Sady’s Lane, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This garden was featured in Cape Cod Home magazine in fall 2015 and be featured in a national gardening magazine in 2017. Visitors will experience surprising vistas and vignettes while strolling the winding garden paths. A stone patio walled by espaliered pear trees and dogwood, archways of beech trees and hydrangea, and a small pond are some of the features of the thirty year old garden. The summer garden includes collections of daylilies, hosta, and hydrangea. Annuals, tropical plants, and container plants accent the garden borders

383 Boxberry Hill Road, East Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This site and the restored home were part of the original 19th century Silas Hatch Homestead (giving the village the name Hatchville) and became the agricultural center of Falmouth. In the 1920’s it became the largest dairy farm east of the Mississippi and remains of that activity can be found on the property.  Today the Hidden House Farm grows organic vegetables and fruits along with a modest selection of common New England herbs with a bit of a contemporary touch.  It has, say some old timers, more “boxberry trees” on this property than anywhere else. This site was once part of a working farm. The home is not on the main road but fronts on a bridal path that is hidden from view and surrounded by horse farms, 300 acres of local conservation to the east and 600 acres of protected state land to the north.

Palmer House Inn, 81 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

At the Inn, there are four buildings and four small gardens. Before going to see the gardens, stop at the Inn’s side veranda to enjoy lemonade and cookies.  The first, garden is the T.W Burgess Garden that is home to several rabbits and is a cool shady spot for guests to relax on a warm summer’s afternoon. Next, there is the H.D.Thoreau Cottage Garden that gives this secluded cottage suite its own private bit of nature. Third, the Innkeeper’s Cottage garden is a pleasant shade garden located at the back of the inn’s property. Last but not least, one can walk through the inn’s herb garden, where the organically grown herbs are located in individual stone bordered beds. The herbs are used in the inn’s sumptuous breakfasts. We suggest that those coming to view the garden, park at the Falmouth Museums on the Green parking lot on Katharine Lee Bates Road. After parking one can stroll through the Museum’s lovely colonial gardens. Upon exiting the garden gate, turn right and take the sidewalk to the Palmer House Inn.

37 Arthur Street, North Falmouth (Wednesday, July 13)

This is a woodland garden on a 2 acre, hilly site where winding lawns are bordered by mixed beds of flowering trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals.  There are many of the standbys – kousas, vibernums, day lilies, hostas by the dozens, heuchera, peonies, iris, roses, sedges, candelabra primulas, lambs ears, grasses, salvias, ageratum, nicotianas, cannas, astilbes – and some less standard – filipendula, jack in the pulpits, podophyllum.  This years’ experiment is lilies of several kinds, missing for several years because of red beetles but willing to try again.  Wear walking shoes – there are woodland paths down to a pond and uphill to an overview of the largest part of the garden.

Each venue will cost $ 5 to attend per person. Tickets can be purchased at each venue or by going to the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce. You can also purchase tickets here:


Hydrangea Fest
Falmouth venues Hydrangea Fest



To learn more about this event Cape-wide, click on http://www.capecodchamber.org/hydrangea-fest