June 24: Jeanne Carley lecture: “Folk Art on Cape Cod”

  • Wednesday, June 24, 7 pm: Jeanne Marie Carley, author of “Folk Art of Cape Cod and the Islands”

Jeanne Carley recounts the histories of the hard working, entrepreneurial people of Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket and their role in this nation, as told through the folk art primitives the residents produced from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. The art displayed includes the works of itinerant painters, domestic weavers and quilters, seminary school watercolorists, and carvers in wood, metal, and stone. Among these fascinating items are: paintings including portraits and silhouettes, landscapes and genre paintings; maritime art such as sculpture and scrimshaw; trade figures and signs; carousel art; wood carvings; weathervanes and whirligigs; religious and decorative art; textiles, including quilts and samplers; and gravestones. All of these beautiful and compelling works of art speak eloquently of the human aspirations sparked by the freedom and prosperity offered by the coasts and the bold, clear visual language that ordered these craftsmen’s world.

April 21: James Coogan lecture: “Slavery on Cape Cod”

  • Tuesday, April 21, 7 pm: James Coogan, “Slavery, Indenture and Abolition on Cape Cod”

Many people on Cape Cod owned slaves right up to the Revolutionary period. Indenture was a common way for people without means to get to this area making an arrangement to be contracted as servants for a set period of time, then to gain their freedom.  There were strict rules as to how indenture was carried out here and penalties for those who abused their servants. And the Abolition movement in this area mirrored what was going on in the northeast of the U.S. Falmouth women were some of the early letter writers to Congress opposing slavery.  .  Much of the negative sentiment in Falmouth reflected the close connection between people in Savannah and Charleston, S.C. who had Falmouth connections either by trade or spending summers on the Cape.

A Colonial Christmas

The Museums on the Green, along with the Falmouth Garden Club, will present “A Colonial Christmas” from Saturday, December 6th to Sunday, December 14.

The 1790 Dr. Francis Wicks House will be decorated and complimentary tours of the venue will be held each day from 10 am to 2 pm.

Additionally, the house will be open from 5 pm to 8 pm on December 7th in conjunction with the Falmouth Town Green Tree Lighting.

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August 7: Arthur Richmond, “The Evolution of the Cape Cod House”

  • Wednesday, August 7th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Arthur Richmond, author of “The Evolution of the Cape Cod House

The Cape Cod house has seen many different and popular architectural styles from its beginnings more than six centuries ago to the present. The story starts in rural England where yeomen and tradesmen built their small one to one-and-a-half story timber framed cottages. The first settlers that came to the New World and settled in Massachusetts built comparable cottages in the 1620s. After explaining the three basic variations half cape, three quarter cape, and full cape, Richmond examines more than 100 historic houses spread throughout southeastern Massachusetts and Cape Cod. A must for anyone interested in architecture, Cape Cod, and the most admired of American homes.