May 21: Janet Uhlar: “Freedom’s Cost: The Story of Gen. Nathanael Greene”

  • Wednesday, May 21: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Janet Uhlar discusses her book “Freedom’s Cost: The Story of General Nathanael Greene”

Nathanael Greene was the strategist of the American Revolution. His role in the War for Independence was second only to General George Washington. Born and reared a Quaker, with no military experience, he was promoted from private to brigadier general overnight. Greene quickly became Washington’s confidant and close friend. He was chosen by the Commander to lead the Continental Army should Washington be killed, injured, or taken captive. It was General Greene who pulled the Continental Army from the throes of death at Valley Forge, who petitioned Congress for a Declaration of Independence, who was given the desperate task of commanding the Southern Department of the Continental Army after other commanders had failed, and who drove British General Cornwallis to surrender at Yorktown. Unable to participate or witness the victorious battle, he was forced to immediately return South with his troops, and subdue the remaining British forces. Greene led his troops in battle and laid siege for a year after the victory at Yorktown. His persistence finally forced the British to evacuate the South.Greene led his men in more battles than any other general officer, including Washington. Moreover, it was Greene who was constantly harassed by Congress, and ultimately forsaken by them. Three years after the official end of the war, Nathanael Greene was dead. His premature death was not only a result of the intense hardships of war, but the hardships and cruelty inflicted on him by the United States Congress.