Saturday, October 28 : A Visit from the Night Watchman

NightWatch10Friday, October 30, 2015 6:00‐9:00 pm

Strange spirits haunt the town of Falmouth, and those that visit will be treated to interactions all throughout the 1790 Dr. Francis Wicks House as this mildly scary haunted experience comes to life.

Recommended for families with children age 6 and higher.

Admission Prices: Adults, $ 10, Children (12 and younger), $ 7, Families of 4: $ 25

Reservations NOT required but visitors should expect a short wait before touring. 

Thursday, Aug. 10, 5:30 pm: Katharine Lee Bates Poetry Fest

Thursday, August 10, 5:30-7:00 pmKatharine Lee Bates Age 41 Professor at Wellesley College

Born in Falmouth, Katharine Lee Bates wrote “America the Beautiful” in 1893, as well as many other works. She celebrated her life in Falmouth throughout her writings and we honor her memory by allowing others to create original pieces of poetry. This annual celebration of her life and works allows local schoolchildren and adults to submit their original works in her honor. There will be judging and winners will be informed well in advance of the program. This event is free and open to all!

To submit an entry: Please print off entry form below.  Each original poem must be 25 lines or less.  Each poet can submit up to 3 original entries. Poems should be on a separate page, unsigned, ready for photocopying.

Deadline for submission: May 25, 2017

Click below to upload entry forms and rules:

KLB Poetry contest cover letter 2017

KLB Poetry Fest Entry Form for Adults 2017

KLB Poetry Fest Entry Form for Students 2017

 

Saturday, Sept. 17, 3 pm: Jerry Thornton, “From Darkness to Dynasty: The First 40 Years of the New England Patriots”

Darkness to DynastyLove them or hate them, what the New England Patriots have been able to do over the past fifteen years is nothing short of remarkable. In addition to their four Super Bowl championships, the Patriots have the best coach in the league, a smart and savvy front office, and a future Hall of Fame quarterback who is internationally recognized as the face of the NFL. The longer the Patriots continue to dominate on the field as well as in the media and the American pop culture landscape, the harder it becomes for anyone to remember them as something other than a model franchise and the ultimate paradigm of success and accomplishment.

Anyone, that is, except for Jerry Thornton. It wasn’tJerry Thornton always sunshine and roses for the Patriots; in fact, for the bulk of their existence, it was exactly the opposite. Though difficult to fathom now, the New England Patriots of old weren’t just bad—they were laughably bad. Not so long ago, the Pats were the laughingstock of not only the NFL but also the entire sporting world.

From Darkness to Dynasty tells the unlikely history of the New England Patriots as it has never been told before. From their humble beginnings as a team bought with rainy-day money by a man who had no idea what he was doing to the fateful season that saw them win their first Super Bowl, Jerry Thornton shares the wild, humiliating, unbelievable, and wonderful stories that comprised the first forty years of what would ultimately become the most dominant franchise in NFL history. Witty, hilarious, and brutally honest, From Darkness to Dynasty returns to the thrilling, perilous days of yesteryear—a welcome corrective for those who hate the Patriots and a useful reminder for those who love them that all glory is fleeting.

 

Inspired by Nature: A Collaborative Program for Young Adults age 9-12

HOW DO HABITATS IMPACT OUR EXISTENCE?

The Cape’s habitats impact science, technology, art, music, history–every part of our daily existence. This summer, your child will explore the many habitats found right here in Falmouth and how they have influenced those who inhabit them.

We invite your child to engage their curiosity as the Cape Cod Conservatory, the Falmouth Art Center, the Falmouth Museums on the Green, Salt Pond Areas Bird Sanctuaries and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration partner with the Falmouth Public Schools to explore the Cape’s habitats.

Guided by teachers and local experts, your child will embark on a five-day hands-on adventure to understand the role and importance of HABITATS on our world and culture.

Inspired by Nature flyer 2016

Inspired by Nature for Website 2

 

 

Inspired by Nature for Website

Join us Monday, June 27th through Friday, July 1st, 9 am to 1 pm.

Register Early: Enrollment is limited to 25 students.  $ 175 per student.

For more information, call email [email protected] or call 508-540-0611

This program made possible by a grant from the Edward Bangs Kelley and Elza Kelley Foundation, Inc., and the  Gordon T. Heald Fund.

 

“The Kissing Sailor”: A Commemoration of V-J Day, September 2, 2015

On Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015—the 70th anniversary of “V-J Day” ending World War II with the Allied victory over Japan–the Falmouth Historical Society will host a dinnerV-J Day2 and program to honor those who served in the Armed Forces during that conflict. This event, held at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, begins at 6 pm that evening and will include a visit from George Mendonsa—better known as “The Kissing Sailor” immortalized in Times Square kissing a nurse when peace was finally declared. There will also be a talk by author Lawrence Verria, who identified just who “The Kissing Sailor” really was; music of the era; and a meal that would fit in with the period.

The event will include Senior Officers from the United States Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and Maritime. In addition to Mr. Verria, a speech will be made by General Gordon R. Sullivan, United States Army (Retired), President of the Association of the United States Army and former Chief of Staff. There will also be period music provided during the evening.V-J Day headline


The Kissing Sailor V-J Day Commemoration Dinner



For those unfamiliar: On August 14, 1945, photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt took a picture of a sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square, minutes after they heard of Japan’s surrender to the United States. Two weeks later LIFE magazine, the world’s dominant photo journal at the time, published that image. It became one of the most famous WWII photographs in history and the most celebrated photograph ever published in the magazine–a cherished reminder of what it felt like for the war to be over. Everyone who saw the picture wanted to know more about the nurse and sailor, but Eisenstaedt had no information and a search for the mysterious couple’s identity took on a dimension of its own.

For many years, no one really knew who “The Kissing Sailor” actually was. There were searches conducted over the years and several candidates were identified, but all of the possibilities turned out to be incorrect. It was not until 2012 Mr. Verria answered the question definitively. Come and learn the story of that quest and the photographic evidence that proves it.

V-J Day3  On September 2, 2015—the 70th anniversary of “V-J Day” (Victory over Japan), the Falmouth Historical Society will welcome Mr. Verria, Mr. Mendonsa and Mrs. Mendonsa (the former Rita Petry) at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth. We will be having a dinner that night, celebrating the exploits of “The Greatest Generation” and allowing people to We will turn the Coonamessett Inn into a 1940’s canteen and honor those who served during World War II.

Menu for the evening: 

   o Minestrone soup (served at the table) 
   o Chicken Pot Pie with crust
   o Beef Bourguignon
   o Mashed potatoes
   o Seasonal Vegetable 
   o Apple Crisp with whipped cream (served at the table)

Special note: any veteran of World War II who lives in Falmouth can attend for no charge that night. If they need someone to come with them, one escort is allowed to attend at a price of $ 40. All other attendees must pay full admission price. To make a reservation for a Falmouth WW2 veteran, please call 508-548-4857 or email [email protected]

This event made possible in part by the sponsorship of Cape Cod Five Bank, Wood Lumber Company, and the Falmouth Road Race.

To purchase a ticket to this dinner at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, click below:


The Kissing Sailor V-J Day Commemoration Dinner



Cannot make the dinner but still want to make a donation to honor those who served in World War 2?  You can do so below:




June 9: Greg Flemming, “At the Point of a Cutlass”

Tuesday, June 9, 7 pm: Greg Flemming, author of “At the Point of a Cutlass: The Pirate Capture, Bold Escape and Lonely Exile of Philip Ashton”

Based on a rare manuscript from 1725, At the Point of a Cutlass uncovers the amazing voyage of Philip Ashton — a nineteen-year old fisherman who was captured by pirates, escaped on an uninhabited Caribbean island, and then miraculously arrived back home three years later to tell his incredible story.

     Taken in a surprise attack near Nova Scotia in June 1722, Ashton was forced to sail across the Atlantic and back with a crew under the command of Edward Low, a man so vicious he tortured victims by slicing off an ear or nose and roasting them over a fire. Ashton barely survived the nine months he sailed with Low’s crew — he was nearly shot in the head at gunpoint, came close to drowning when a ship sank near the coast of Brazil, and was almost hanged for secretly plotting a revolt against the pirates. Like many forced men, Ashton thought constantly about escaping. In March of 1723, he saw his chance when Low’s crew anchored at the secluded island of Roatan, at the western edge of the Caribbean. Ashton fled into the thick, overgrown woods and, for more than a year, had to claw out a living on the remote strip of land, completely alone and with practically nothing to sustain him. The opportunity to escape came so unexpectedly that Ashton ran off without a gun, a knife, or even a pair of shoes on his feet. Yet the resilient young castaway — who has been called America’s real-life Robinson Crusoe — was able to find food, build a crude shelter, and even survive a debilitating fever brought on by the cool winter rains before he was rescued by a band of men sailing near the island. Based on Ashton’s own first-hand account, as well trial records, logbooks, and a wealth of other archival evidence, At the Point of a Cutlass pieces together the unforgettable story of a man thrust into the violent world of a pirate ship and his daring survival and escape.

Tuesday, May 13, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Nathaniel Philbrick, “Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution”

  • Tuesday, May 13: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Nathaniel Philbrick discusses his book “Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution

NOTE: THIS LECTURE WILL BE HELD AT ST. BARNABAS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 91 MAIN STREET, FALMOUTH

Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord.  In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists.
Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control.
With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.

April 9: Heritage Award Dinner

On Wednesday, April 9 at 6 pm, at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, the Falmouth Historical Society and the Museums on the Green will host the annual Heritage Award dinner.  This is to recognize individuals or groups who have made a significant and positive impact upon the town of Falmouth and to Cape Cod.

Our 2014 recipients are Elizabeth Heald Arthur and Sally Cross.

This event is sponsored by:

Orchid Level:  C.H. Newton Builders Inc.

Rose Level:  Wood Lumber Company

Rose Level:  M. Duffany Builders

Tulip Level:  Compassionate Care ALS

Tulip Level:  Jim and Caroline Lloyd

Advertiser:  Falmouth Art Center

 

We hope you can join us to honor and celebrate the lives of these two extraordinary ladies.

Menu:  (cash bar)

  • Cheese and crackers
  • House Salad
  • Entrée Choice:
    • Chicken Saltimbocca
    • Pistachio encrusted Salmon
    • Vegetarian Plate
  • Strawberry Shortcake

(Note: $35 of this event is tax-deductible.)

To make a reservation, please click the link below:

 


Heritage Dinner April 9 2014
Dinner Choice



Feb. 20: Lecture: Stephen Kinzer: “The Brothers”

  • Thursday, February 20: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Stephen Kinzer discussing his book, “The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles and their Secret World War”.

During the 1950s, when the Cold War was at its peak, two immensely powerful brothers led the United States into a series of foreign adventures whose effects are still shaking the world.John Foster Dulles was secretary of state while his brother, Allen Dulles, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In this book, Stephen Kinzer places their extraordinary lives against the background of American culture and history. He uses the framework of biography to ask: Why does the United States behave as it does in the world? The Brothers explores hidden forces that shape the national psyche, from religious piety to Western movies—many of which are about a noble gunman who cleans up a lawless town by killing bad guys. This is how the Dulles brothers saw themselves, and how many Americans still see their country’s role in the world. Propelled by a quintessentially American set of fears and delusions, the Dulles brothers launched violent campaigns against foreign leaders they saw as threats to the United States. These campaigns helped push countries from Guatemala to the Congo into long spirals of violence, led the United States into the Vietnam War, and laid the foundation for decades of hostility between the United States and countries from Cuba to Iran.

A Colonial Christmas

The Museums on the Green, along with the Falmouth Garden Club, will present “A Colonial Christmas” from Saturday, December 6th to Sunday, December 14.

The 1790 Dr. Francis Wicks House will be decorated and complimentary tours of the venue will be held each day from 10 am to 2 pm.

Additionally, the house will be open from 5 pm to 8 pm on December 7th in conjunction with the Falmouth Town Green Tree Lighting.

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July 17: Special Event: A Night with Evan Thomas

  • Wednesday, July 17th, 7:00 pm: Special Event: A Night with Evan Thomas, author of “Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle to Save the World

Upon assuming the presidency in 1953, Dwight Eisenhower came to be seen by many as a doddering lightweight. Yet behind the bland smile and apparent simplemindedness was a brilliant, intellectual tactician. As Evan Thomas reveals in his provocative examination of Ike’s White House years, Eisenhower was a master of calculated duplicity. As with his bridge and poker games he was eventually forced to stop playing after leaving too many fellow army officers insolvent, Ike could be patient and ruthless in the con, and generous and expedient in his partnerships. Facing the Soviet Union, China, and his own generals, some of whom believed a first strike was the only means of survival, Eisenhower would make his boldest and riskiest bet yet, one of such enormity that there could be but two outcomes: the survival of the world, or its end.
This is the story of how he won.

June 27th: Stephanie Schorow, author of “Drinking Boston”

  • Thursday, June 27th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: Stephanie Schorow, author of “Drinking Boston: A History of the City and its Spirits”

From the revolutionary camaraderie of the Colonial taverns to the saloons of the turn of the century; from Prohibition—a period rife with class politics, social reform, and opportunism—to a trail of nightclub neon so vast, it was called the “Conga Belt”, Drinking Boston is a tribute to the fascinating role alcohol has played throughout the city s history. Teasing out this curious relationship—in particular, the clash between a constrained Puritanism (lingering like a hangover today) and a raucous revolutionary spirit—Drinking Boston introduces the cast of characters who championed or vilified drinking and the places where they imbibed—legally and otherwise. Visiting some of Boston s most storied neighborhood bars, this pub crawl ends with Boston s distinct recipe for the current cocktail renaissance sweeping the nation. Stephanie Schorow serves up a remarkable cocktail representative of Boston s intoxicating story: its spirit of invention, its hardscrabble politics, its mythology, and the city s never-ending battle between personal freedom and civic reform.

June 20th: Casey Sherman, author of “Animal”

Thursday, June 20th, 7:00 pm

  • Lecture: Casey Sherman, author of “Animal: The Bloody Rise and Fall of the Mob’s Most Feared Assassin”

Joe Barboza knew that there were two requirements for getting inducted into the Mafia. You had to be Sicilian. And you had to commit a contract killing. The New Bedford-born mobster was a proud Portuguese, not Sicilian, but his dream to be part of La Cosa Nostra proved so strong that he thought he could create a loophole. If he killed enough men, if he did enough of the Mafia’s dirtiest biddings, then they would have no choice but to make him a Made Man. Barboza’s brutal rise during one of the deadliest mob wars in U.S. history became the stuff of legend, both on the bloodied streets of Boston and in the offices of the FBI and the U.S. Attorney General. He took sick joy in his crimes, and it became increasingly difficult for the mob to keep the Animal on his leash. But soon the hunter became the hunted. Betrayed by the mob and now on the run, Boston’s most notorious contract killer forged a Faustian bargain with two unscrupulous FBI agents–a pact that would transform the U.S. criminal justice system. From false testimony and manipulated evidence that sent mob leaders to death row, to the creation of the Witness Protection Program so the feds could protect their prized, cold-blooded witness, this was the horrific, dramatic first act in a story of murder and FBI corruption still being played out today in the news and the courtroom with the capture and trial of Whitey Bulger. Barboza’s legacy, buried for years thanks to the murders or deaths of its participants, is finally coming to light and being told in its unvarnished brutality by one of America’s most respected true crime writers.

June 3rd: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season”

Monday, June 3rd, 7:00 pm.

  • Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball’s Golden Age”

In 1945 Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself. Parks were half empty, the balls were made with fake rubber, and mediocre replacements roamed the fields, as hundreds of players, including the game’s biggest stars, were serving abroad, devoted to unconditional Allied victory in World War II.But by the spring of 1946, the country was ready to heal. The war was finally over, and as America’s fathers and brothers were coming home, so too were the sport’s greats. Ted Williams, Stan Musial, and Joe DiMaggio returned with bats blazing, making the season a true classic that ended in a thrilling seven-game World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals. America also witnessed the beginning of a new era in baseball-it was a year of attendance records, the first year Yankee Stadium held night games, the last year the Green Monster wasn’t green, and, most significant, Jackie Robinson’s first year playing in the Brooklyn Dodgers’ system.
The Victory Season brings to vivid life these years of baseball and war, including the little known “World Series” that servicemen played in a captured Hitler Youth stadium in the fall of 1945. Robert Weintraub’s extensive research and vibrant storytelling enliven the legendary season that embodies what we now think of as the game’s golden era.

May 15: “Crime Time: How to Write a Mystery!” with Sandra Lee, Michele McPhee and Kyle Darcy

  • Wednesday, May 15th, 7:00 pm: Lecture: “Crime Time: How to Write about a Mystery!”  with Sandra Lee, author of “The Shanty”, along with Michele McPhee, author of “A Mob Story” and Kyle Darcy, author of “Under Current Conditions”

Two popular female authors—one involving fiction, one in non-fiction—, as well as a novelist whose work is based on fact–come to Falmouth to team up to discuss their works and what goes into successfully writing about mysteries.