Wednesday, October 19, 7 pm: Danny Orbach, “The Plots Against Hitler”

Plots Against HitlerIn 1933, Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany. A year later, all parties but the Nazis had been outlawed, freedom of the press was but a memory, and Hitler’s dominance seemed complete. Yet over the next few years, an unlikely clutch of conspirators emerged – soldiers, schoolteachers, politicians, diplomats, theologians, even a carpenter – who would try repeatedly to end the Fuhrer’s genocidal reign. This dramatic and deeply researched book tells the full story of those noble, ingenious, and doomed efforts. This is history at its most suspenseful, as we witness secret midnight meetings, crises of conscience, fierce debates among old friends about whether and how to dismantle Nazism, and the various plots themselves being devised and executed.

Orbach’s fresh research takes advantage of his singular skills as linguist and historian to offer profound insight into the conspirators’ methods, motivations, fears, and hopes. Though we know how this story ends, we’ve had no idea until now how close it came – several times – to ending very differently. The Plots Against Hitler fundamentally alters our view of World War II and sheds bright – even redemptive – light on its darkest days.

“The Kissing Sailor”: A Commemoration of V-J Day, September 2, 2015

On Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015—the 70th anniversary of “V-J Day” ending World War II with the Allied victory over Japan–the Falmouth Historical Society will host a dinnerV-J Day2 and program to honor those who served in the Armed Forces during that conflict. This event, held at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, begins at 6 pm that evening and will include a visit from George Mendonsa—better known as “The Kissing Sailor” immortalized in Times Square kissing a nurse when peace was finally declared. There will also be a talk by author Lawrence Verria, who identified just who “The Kissing Sailor” really was; music of the era; and a meal that would fit in with the period.

The event will include Senior Officers from the United States Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard and Maritime. In addition to Mr. Verria, a speech will be made by General Gordon R. Sullivan, United States Army (Retired), President of the Association of the United States Army and former Chief of Staff. There will also be period music provided during the evening.V-J Day headline


The Kissing Sailor V-J Day Commemoration Dinner



For those unfamiliar: On August 14, 1945, photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt took a picture of a sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square, minutes after they heard of Japan’s surrender to the United States. Two weeks later LIFE magazine, the world’s dominant photo journal at the time, published that image. It became one of the most famous WWII photographs in history and the most celebrated photograph ever published in the magazine–a cherished reminder of what it felt like for the war to be over. Everyone who saw the picture wanted to know more about the nurse and sailor, but Eisenstaedt had no information and a search for the mysterious couple’s identity took on a dimension of its own.

For many years, no one really knew who “The Kissing Sailor” actually was. There were searches conducted over the years and several candidates were identified, but all of the possibilities turned out to be incorrect. It was not until 2012 Mr. Verria answered the question definitively. Come and learn the story of that quest and the photographic evidence that proves it.

V-J Day3  On September 2, 2015—the 70th anniversary of “V-J Day” (Victory over Japan), the Falmouth Historical Society will welcome Mr. Verria, Mr. Mendonsa and Mrs. Mendonsa (the former Rita Petry) at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth. We will be having a dinner that night, celebrating the exploits of “The Greatest Generation” and allowing people to We will turn the Coonamessett Inn into a 1940’s canteen and honor those who served during World War II.

Menu for the evening: 

   o Minestrone soup (served at the table) 
   o Chicken Pot Pie with crust
   o Beef Bourguignon
   o Mashed potatoes
   o Seasonal Vegetable 
   o Apple Crisp with whipped cream (served at the table)

Special note: any veteran of World War II who lives in Falmouth can attend for no charge that night. If they need someone to come with them, one escort is allowed to attend at a price of $ 40. All other attendees must pay full admission price. To make a reservation for a Falmouth WW2 veteran, please call 508-548-4857 or email [email protected]

This event made possible in part by the sponsorship of Cape Cod Five Bank, Wood Lumber Company, and the Falmouth Road Race.

To purchase a ticket to this dinner at the Coonamessett Inn in Falmouth, click below:


The Kissing Sailor V-J Day Commemoration Dinner



Cannot make the dinner but still want to make a donation to honor those who served in World War 2?  You can do so below:




Wed., August 6, 7 pm: World War II History–An Evening with Alex Kershaw

  • Wednesday, August 6: Lecture, 7 pm: “World War II History: An Evening with Alex Kershaw”

Alex Kershaw is the author of the widely acclaimed best sellers The Bedford BoysThe Longest Winter, The Few, Escape from the Deep, and The Envoy, as well as biographies of both Jack London and Robert Capa. His latest book is The Liberator.

June 3rd: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season”

Monday, June 3rd, 7:00 pm.

  • Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball’s Golden Age”

In 1945 Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself. Parks were half empty, the balls were made with fake rubber, and mediocre replacements roamed the fields, as hundreds of players, including the game’s biggest stars, were serving abroad, devoted to unconditional Allied victory in World War II.But by the spring of 1946, the country was ready to heal. The war was finally over, and as America’s fathers and brothers were coming home, so too were the sport’s greats. Ted Williams, Stan Musial, and Joe DiMaggio returned with bats blazing, making the season a true classic that ended in a thrilling seven-game World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals. America also witnessed the beginning of a new era in baseball-it was a year of attendance records, the first year Yankee Stadium held night games, the last year the Green Monster wasn’t green, and, most significant, Jackie Robinson’s first year playing in the Brooklyn Dodgers’ system.
The Victory Season brings to vivid life these years of baseball and war, including the little known “World Series” that servicemen played in a captured Hitler Youth stadium in the fall of 1945. Robert Weintraub’s extensive research and vibrant storytelling enliven the legendary season that embodies what we now think of as the game’s golden era.