Thursday, July 14, 7 pm: Robert Weintraub, “No Better Friend: One Man, One Dog, and Their Extraordinary Story of Courage and Survival in World War II”

No Better FriendFlight technician Frank Williams and Judy, a purebred pointer, met in the most unlikely of places: a World War II internment camp in the Pacific. Judy was a fiercely loyal dog, with a keen sense for who was friend and who was foe, and the pair’s relationship deepened throughout their captivity. When the prisoners suffered beatings, Judy would repeatedly risk her life to intervene. She survived bombings and other near-death experiences and became a beacon not only for Frank but for all the men, who saw in her survival a flicker of hope for their own. Judy’s devotion to those she was interned with was matched by their love for her, which helped keep the men and their dog alive despite the ever-present threat of death by disease or the rifles of the guards. At one point, deep in despair and starvation, Frank contemplated killing himself and the dog to prevent either from watching the other die. But both were rescued, and Judy spent the rest of her life with Frank. She became the war’s only official canine POW, and after she died at age fourteen, Frank couldn’t bring himself to ever have another dog. Their story–of an unbreakable bond forged in the worst circumstances–is one of the great undiscovered sagas of World War II.

July 30: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, “The House that Ruth Built”

  • Wednesday, July 30: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Robert Weintraub discusses his book “The House that Ruth Built: A New Stadium, The First Yankees Championship, and the Redemption of 1923”

Weintraub examines the 1923 New York Yankees, the team that opened Yankee Stadium and won the first of the Bronx Bombers’ record 27 World Series titles. The center of this work is the clash between the Yankees’ star, Babe Ruth, with his new “bashing” style of playing the game, and the classic “scientific baseball” epitomized by manager John McGraw and his New York Giants. While the Giants got the best of the Yanks in the ’22 fall classic, Ruth and the Yankees’ 1923 World Series victory over their crosstown rivals would change the face of baseball and New York City forever.. Weintraub details everything from the construction of the stadium and the careers of Ruth and McGraw to a detailed season overview and deconstruction of the 1923 World Series.

  • Wednesday, July 30: Lecture, 7 pm: Author Robert Weintraub discusses his book “The House that Ruth Built: A New Stadium, The First Yankees Championship, and the Redemption of 1923”

Weintraub examines the 1923 New York Yankees, the team that opened Yankee Stadium and won the first of the Bronx Bombers’ record 27 World Series titles. The center of this work is the clash between the Yankees’ star, Babe Ruth, with his new “bashing” style of playing the game, and the classic “scientific baseball” epitomized by manager John McGraw and his New York Giants. While the Giants got the best of the Yanks in the ’22 fall classic, Ruth and the Yankees’ 1923 World Series victory over their crosstown rivals would change the face of baseball and New York City forever.. Weintraub details everything from the construction of the stadium and the careers of Ruth and McGraw to a detailed season overview and deconstruction of the 1923 World Series.

June 3rd: Lecture: Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season”

Monday, June 3rd, 7:00 pm.

  • Robert Weintraub, author of “The Victory Season: The End of World War II and the Birth of Baseball’s Golden Age”

In 1945 Major League Baseball had become a ghost of itself. Parks were half empty, the balls were made with fake rubber, and mediocre replacements roamed the fields, as hundreds of players, including the game’s biggest stars, were serving abroad, devoted to unconditional Allied victory in World War II.But by the spring of 1946, the country was ready to heal. The war was finally over, and as America’s fathers and brothers were coming home, so too were the sport’s greats. Ted Williams, Stan Musial, and Joe DiMaggio returned with bats blazing, making the season a true classic that ended in a thrilling seven-game World Series between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals. America also witnessed the beginning of a new era in baseball-it was a year of attendance records, the first year Yankee Stadium held night games, the last year the Green Monster wasn’t green, and, most significant, Jackie Robinson’s first year playing in the Brooklyn Dodgers’ system.
The Victory Season brings to vivid life these years of baseball and war, including the little known “World Series” that servicemen played in a captured Hitler Youth stadium in the fall of 1945. Robert Weintraub’s extensive research and vibrant storytelling enliven the legendary season that embodies what we now think of as the game’s golden era.